Sanding oak floor


I have almost finished laying an oak floor in my lounge. I have fitted the floor as a 'floating' floor, glueing the tongues and grooves of each board together. This is solid wood, not laminate, but to save cost I fitted unfinished boards - so I need to give them a final sanding before I apply varnish. The finish is fairly good, but I would like to sand them down to remove some of the slight differences in height between some of the boards. I would be very grateful if anyone who has done this could give me any advice on the procedure. I was thinking at first that I would simply go to a hire shop and get one of these standard floor sanding machines, and that would be it - a quick spin round and job done. Having read a few things about the procedure, I no longer feel quite so confident - it seems to be quite a complicated business, with all kinds of worrying and disastrous possibilities. Any advice anyone?
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I sanded an oak parquet floor some time ago - very uneven,part relaid, etc. the drum sander I used was very agressive when I trapped it in a corner, so beware of this type.
A circular sander, to my mind, would be cross-grain on the wood, in parts.
I put down 6 coats of polyurethane varnish, and now 10 years later, needs re-doing.
Thinking of buying a belt sander from Been & Queued, with dust from bag, adding to fglass resin for cracks etc.
I have heard that you dont varnish now, much better to use a seal - anyone know anout this?
Don't know if this helps Farmer Giles
cojack

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wrote:

if you have a big area to do you will need the drum sander. the reason they are so heavy is to exert the neccesary downward pressure.the weight makes the machine cumbersome to manoeuvre and you need to keep a firm grip on the handle when you start it up or it will run away from you.but if can drive a car .......
you use a coarse belt to remove high spots and then the finer belts to get your finish . you will also need a smaller sander to reach in corners and close to skirting.best get one of those heavy circular ones that are made especially for doing this
incidentally those big drum sanders were 600 last time i was using them. dont expect the same performance from a 100 b&q belt sander
having said all that,ive never seen these rotating head thingys-- they may be just the ticket
breeze
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