Moving/replacing a radiator


I'm after some advice on moving a radiator some distance from its current position and replacing it with one of those tall/narrow designer rads - probably something like this:
http://www.screwfix.com/prods/62690/Plumbing/Designer-Radiators/Parallel-Rail-Radiator-1762x650x89
Current sitation is as follows:
Rad I want to move is the last rad in the system in my dining room furthest from the boiler and fed down on 10mm microbore reduced from the 15mm pipes running across the back of the house in the ground floor ceiling (concrete floored house).
I'm having an extension built and the rad is under the dining room window which is being knocked through.
Just before this rad is the one in the bedroom directly above -teed off on shoft sections of 8mm microbore.
What I'm thinking of doing is chopping and end stopping the pipes after the bedroom radiator (making that the last in the system). I'm then going to tee a couple of pipes off just before the bedroom rad and run them across to the other side of the dining room ceiling and down the wall - a distance of approx 8ft horizontal and 7ft downwards. This will need to be done on either 10 or 8mm microbore as its a awkward pipe run.
My question is whether there is a risk of poor water circulation AND whether the pipe size is critical - i.e. use 10 rather than 8.
TIA, Midge
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As you are only tapping off the same feed as before but at a slightly different point I doubt you will have any problems when you move this radiator. Use 10mm pipe if you can if you can. Better still try to use 15mm from where you tap in and just use 10mm for the drop down the wall if this is possible.
Adam
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Thanks Adam - I'll have a look at that. It would be a bit more work to get 15mm in - but the dining room ceiling, being artexted, will be skimmed flat right through into the new extension anyway so opening up the ceiling to do this may be easier than taking loads of floor boards up in the bedroom above.
Midge.

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Are you using plastic or copper pipe? 15mm plastic pipe threads very easily through holes in the joists.
Adam
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To be honest, I'd not thought about plastic Adam - I prefer anything that's permanently sealed out of sight to be done in copper.
Midge.

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Nowt wrong with the pex pipe, it's guarenteed for 25 years or 50 years they rekon,
i've had it in my motorhome running it's centeral heating for 4 years now, been over some seriousely bad roads (enough to break welds on a scooter rack) and the pipework has been totaly leak free, i have a fair few connections in my system, and none of them have worked loose, so in a house with only the odd shaking for earthquakes, there shud be no probs, and i'd go for plastic pipe over copper anyday just for the ease of installing it.
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Thanks Gazz - I'll mull it over a bit longer!
Midge.

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