High temperature plaster?


We want to have an inset stove fitted into an existing chimney breast. However, the fitting instructions call for the area surrounding the stove, to be pastered with 'high temperature plaster'.
Could anyone advise me what this is, or what it consists of?
Many thanks,
Colin
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snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com wrote:

Fire cement.
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Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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Others here will prob give you more info, but try googling for "intumescent plaster" uk ... or similar
HTH
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Martin

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Martin wrote:

Intumescent means expand in volume when exposed to heat or flames exceeding a specified temperature. I don't think that's what the original poster wants!
Mike
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Most of the "High Temperature" plasters seem to be for the likes of lost wax casting, and similar foundry practices. I dont think it is going to get that hot!
Problem is, that these plasters wont be very good for trowel finishing.
As an alternative may i suggest sand and cement? perhaps a fire cement margin at the very edge if the cast iron, and possibly a tier of tiles to stop the heat getting to the wallpaper?
John

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Oops - sorry. Will try to engage brain-cell in future.... :-(
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Martin

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http://www.envirograf.com/products/product115.html
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wrote:

How hot is it going to get for goodness sake!
The surround for my fire, originally a solid fuel stove was sand/ cement render with a facing of tiles, originally set in the original render. Now the recess contains a gas boiler with new tiles secured with ordinary tile cement, which softens with heat - the tiles are still in place.
I've secured tiles onto plywood using ordinary tile cement a very short distance away from a solid fuel stove - the tiles stayed put.
I've used ordinary "thistle" plaster as a capping on glass fibre packing seal on the flue discharge from a gas boiler - still not reduced to powder and still in place after 25 years of use
Point being that I don't think you need anything too heat resistant adjacent to plaster around a boiler. I think the manufacturer's are just trying to offset the bleats of customers who find that the plaster crazes a little around their boiler by making the heat-resistant claim.
I'd try a normal approach to the plastering and see what happens. Give it a few days to dry out reasonably before you subject it to intense heat.
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Sam wrote:

Well, Stovax, the manufacturers recommend a minimum of 1500 deg C and say it should be 1700 deg C.
Speaking to the local Council, Building Regulations and they agree, saying the actual area touching the built-in stove, should be built with refractory quality bricks and must be heat resistant plaster.
Thanks,
Colin
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I've seen solid fuel stoves glowing cherry red. This was back in the 60s-70s when we used them for heating workshops and line cabins. Advice to use heat resistant rendering in a house is good advice. A sand cement mix is probably okay if there is a sufficient gap between it and the stove wall.

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