Heating question


What is best, leaving central heating on overnight so it just keeps ticking over keeping the house warm. Or having it off for 4 or 5 hours , then it uses a lot of gas to get the temp up?
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This came up recently, and I believe that one suggestion was that it really depends how well insulated the property is. I.e. just how far the temperature drops overnight. I'm afraid I am of the switch it off camp. Our hot water is on continuously, as recommended by the boiler manufacturer, but the heating is on from 7:15am-8:30am, and then from 4:45pm-10:30pm.
I don't like it too hot overnight anyway. I can't sleep. I prefer to rely on the bedding for night time warmth.
JW
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What boiler do you have? I have never seen one that recommends the HW is on all day.
Adam

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It's an IMO Powermax 155. Approx 12 years old. A strange beast according to our plumber.
JW
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again, and it says "set to continuous hot water" setting, but on further reading, that is purely for lighting the boiler.
Have now switched both to timed. I wonder how long it will be before I get the "there's no hot water" comment? :-)
JW
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Definately no need for constant HW. Should save you a few quid.
Adam
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Yes, hopefully. Wrong end of winter though for the real savings I guess. Ah well. I shan't be mentioning my faux pas to the other half! ;-)
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Best option if you're old enough to need to get up in the night and want to be warm.

That will certainly keep you (both) warm... :-)
But, in the sense you meant...
"Having it off" is the cheapest option since heat loss (and hence cost) is a function of temperature gradient.
HTH
--
Martin


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For some years now, this time of year, I've been running the heating continuously and controlling with the thermostat. I've found this quite economical.
For example, at night, or if I'm going out for a few hours, I turn the temperature down so that it only comes on if it gets very cold. I'm at home most of the time (retired) and also use the thermostat according to what I'm doing - if I'm decorating or something active, it goes down - if I'm sitting reading or watching telly, it goes up.
It's a matter of remembering to do it, really, and being quite disciplined about it, but this method keeps a background temperature reasonable in the event of getting up in the night etc.
It does, of course, depend on reasonable insulation.
Barb
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If my other half was as reliable as you are about turning down the thermostat when going out etc, I'd probably consider leaving it on for longer. But it won't happen. So I have to keep up my draconian regime! ;-)
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In the Land Fit For Heroes.
Mr Pounder

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Depends on insulation levels. Also the temperature you want to keep the house at. A modern efficient boiler will not use that much gas firing up and getting the temperature up. My gas bill from the start of November to the middle of February was 75. Mainly because I don't pay twice as much with companies that overcharge like British Gas. It has been at between 21 and 23c in here most days and still is now. Included in that is heating water too. My boiler would only switch on to get the house to temperature within about 20mins, then go on every 45mins or so for about 5-10mins. Through the night it cools down to a minimum of 16c which isn't exactly freezing. I have it all programmed to operate most of the day. I have cavity wall insulation, about 2ft of loft insulation, also insulation under the floorboards upstairs. I put that in as I was rewiring, it's like polystyrene beads! There is no real benefit in keeping your heating on low. Just heat as you require. Think of a kettle. Keep switching it on and off instead of boiling as required will use a lot more power.
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. My gas bill from the

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My gas bill from the

What size is your house, how old is it and boiler and who do you buy gas from, as I guess a lot of people would like to have such low bills as you do?!
AJ
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Isn't the 2ft of insulation in the loft, and the insulated ground floor ceiling likely to contribute to that? We have about 3" of insulation in our loft. I'd like more, but I need a boot sale to clear the loft out first!!
JW
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AJH wrote:

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