Drains


I want to cut into the soil pipe running from house to the main sewer on the road, and add a 45 degree branch that will go to a new inspection chamber and then to an outside toilet that I am going to install at the end of my garage. Having dug down and uncovered the soil pipe in the appropriate place I see that, as expected, the drains are the older type 5 inch pipes (the house is just over 30 years old). My question is about soil pipe sizes: are the 110 mm plastic underground drainage pipes compatible with the older type - that is, will the female collar accept the existing pipes, or if not how do you get around this?
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Are the drain pipes earthen ware or plastic? All makers always have their own specific little differences in the fitting design and styles of their pipework, so try to get a makers name off the pipes, usually printed along the length somewhere, and obtain the proper fittings needed for the job you're doing. This way you know the fitting are meant for the pipes you have, so you shouldn't have any problems with them.
Earthen ware to plastic joints can be tricky, so make sure you have proper seal rings and things at hand before you start the job, because it is always the case that something won't be just big or small enough and you don't have seal boot that you can place over the joint to allow you to finish up.
The best way is to match fittings by makers name, and you should be able to finish in no time.
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The existing pipes are earthenware, the outside diameter being exactly 5 inches. Along the length of pipe that I've uncovered - about a metre - I can't see any maker's name. I was wondering, that if I could get a plastic junction to fit approximately, would it be acceptable to (carefully) encase it in concrete?
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The words "roughly" and "just about" are not something you should do on drainage systems mate. They can contain explosive gases and need to be secure enough not to break if ignited. Any weak spots then become very vulnerable indeed. Drainage systems need to be securely water and gas tight along their full length. They also have to have as smooth an internal surface as is at all possible to create. If you can't get the system as close to this as you can, then you are giving yourself major problems in the future.
Drainage pipes contain smelly vapours and, as I said before, can contain a build up of explosive gases, so any weak spots can make the whole thing a time bomb just waiting to go off. Any differences in the height, size or shape of a joint can cause solid waste products to catch and stick, which in turn catches more and more debris that flows along the pipe. This only leads to continual blockages and head aches and it should be avoided completely.
Earthen ware pipe and fittings are cheap from any good plumbers merchant, and when you compare price to the length of time they last under ground, then work out as great value for money. It is always best to make the job properly and cut down on the problems that can arise in the future if it is done incorrectly. It's the sort of job you want to do only once and then forget it, so do it right first time and don't have the hassle later.
Find a source for the pipework and fittings first. The pipe you have sounds like standard old style terrain drain stock, so should be easily obtained. You need a TEE fitting and Slip Spigot fitting for the job. The TEE fitting is obvious, but the Slip Spigot is a different story.
A Slip Spigot is just a circle fitting that slides over the end of a plain cut section of pipe. it allows you to cut out a section to install the TEE then slide it back over the end and caulk the joints between them tightly and securely. This keeps the internal diameter of the pipework all the same and ensures that the solid waste will slide away without problems.
The whole of the section you install can then be encased in a concrete coffin to make sure the whole thing stays level and doesn't sink when the surrounding soil is back filled and compressed. The new TEE branch you install can then have pretty standard reducers fitted that will bring the sizes down to the diameter you need for the new section to your appliances, from there on.
So find a good source for all the fitting you'll need first, and you should be able to install the whole thing without having to bodge anything. Don't give yourself problems in the future.
Good luck with it.
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<gulp> Is the water in the seal at the bottom of the pan not a weak spot <gulp> should one refrain from sitting on it <gulp> the mind boggles <gulp>
--
Keith Willcocks
(If you can't laugh at life, it ain't worth living!)
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I've actually seen the aftermath of water blown out of all the traps on a remote farm, so sitting quietly reading the paper at the time might have been an experience. :-) This is supposed to have happened because of a mile long build up of the waste flushed down from the farm into the drainage system. It had all gathered against a small blockage that was only allowing a trickle of water to seep by, but was holding back the solid waste.
The build up of gases from the solid waste soon made short work of emptying the pipes when it ignited though. :-) LOL Oh my, how we all laughed. :-)
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'roughly'. What I had in mind was to encase the joint completely in concrete, which I've done in the past - and which lasted for several years without problems. Actually I've done drainage jobs like this for almost fifty years, including installing septic tanks, but I haven't done any for a little while so I was simply hoping to be pointed in the direction of a suitable adaptor between clay pipes and 110 mm plastic - I've now found the thing I want at Toolstation. Most of what you say above is absolute bollocks - and self-important bollocks at that. This is household drainage not a bloody oil supply line - 'gas tight' indeed. The whole needs to be - and will be - vented for a start. This newsgroup seems to have gone right down the tubes - I think it should be renamed the Big Wallop copy and paste from Google page. Goodbye.
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This newsgroup seems to have gone right

Now that is what I call gentlemanly behaviour (I don't think). Ask for advice and then abuse those that give it. BW has given excellent advice at no cost to many people on this group and I for one have learnt much and greatly value his knowledge. I suggest you crawl back under the stone from whence you came.
--
Keith Willcocks
(If you can't laugh at life, it ain't worth living!)
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BigWallop wrote: <snip>

You know, like getting rid of waste... :O) Gilbert
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