Wood Floor Trusses

I am looking at the probability of building a house soon using a wood floor truss system rather than a concrete slab. I've been looking at dozens of web sites for manufacturers and the one big thing I've noticed is, none of them are willing to talk prices online.
What I need is some kind of ballpark figure that will help me decide which way to go with this.
My plan is a simple 40x40 foot base. No basement. Just a crawlspace. The outer perimiter will be a simple 12 inch wide footer slab. Then a 3 course cinder block on that. Onto which the trusses will be mounted. Down the center, another foot wide footer slab and cinder block.
So I would have at most a 20 foot span. If necessary, footer slabs at the 10 foot marks.
24 inches on center so then I would need 40 trusses.
What's that gonna cost me for the trusses?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bullis,
Since most who read this forum, are estimators for truss manufacturers. I think we will all agree, the final cost will be a buck two ninety eight each.
Another solution would be to take the wheels off your tow behind trailer, and put it up on concrete blocks. Then it will match your pickup truck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 17 Jul 2011 13:21:33 -0400, David1950 wrote:

wonder which one of the old kookmeisters from AUK you are? you sound just like a couple of them. You know all about me including my last name, what I own and that. Care to put up on the line all of your personal information? I'll bet you're not man enough to do that.
And oh yeah, post a copy of your engineer's license.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You don't need an engineer to tell you where to stick your concrete blocks! Bullis you're as dumb as ever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*I have no idea as to cost, but I wonder why the need for trusses with a crawlspace. I see trusses mostly used in condominiums to allow for the installation of the utilities and ductwork. Sometimes I see them used in houses for interior floors for the same reason. In houses built like you propose, there is no need to make allowances for utilities because everything can be mounted underneath, therefore regular solid wood joists are used. If you want the span without too many footings you can use I-Joists.
I would think that your outer perimeter footings should be a few feet down.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 18 Jul 2011 14:19:54 -0400, John Grabowski wrote:

thanks for the info. I'm just looking at all the various options I have to do this. I just may wind up doing 4 course of cinder block then a standard 2x10 on that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 18 Jul 2011 14:19:54 -0400, "John Grabowski"

If I were to build anything today I would use as much engineered lumber as possible. I-joists or trusses would be top of my list. Dimensional lumber around here just looks like crap,..... knots, cracks and warpage galore. (Pennsylvania)
Remove 333 to reply. Randy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Richard, What kind of building are you planning? Is it one or 2 story. Is it on a hill or level? Is it a residence or shop?
In many constructions here on the northern Calif. coast we use 2x6 for form material, and then use that after it is cleaned in the subfloor. It is a very efficient and easy way to go. Also you may install a "bond beam" down the centerline of the building to support, or a series of poured concrete piers to support floor loads. Both work well, and can be all poured at the same time. The form is stripped and the materials scraped and then re-used in the framing and such.
Block is a fine way to go also, and using any type of readily available floor joist system will work fine. The larger the floor joist the least amount of support.
Many ways to go. I use engineered trusses too, and you have to block those also. You buy the strand board that they make that matches the width of the engineered floor joist and use it for rime and block. I find standard lumber easier to work with than the engineered but that is just my choice. I have less splitting, and such with natural wood compared to manufactured boards.
john
"richard" wrote in message
I am looking at the probability of building a house soon using a wood floor truss system rather than a concrete slab. I've been looking at dozens of web sites for manufacturers and the one big thing I've noticed is, none of them are willing to talk prices online.
What I need is some kind of ballpark figure that will help me decide which way to go with this.
My plan is a simple 40x40 foot base. No basement. Just a crawlspace. The outer perimiter will be a simple 12 inch wide footer slab. Then a 3 course cinder block on that. Onto which the trusses will be mounted. Down the center, another foot wide footer slab and cinder block.
So I would have at most a 20 foot span. If necessary, footer slabs at the 10 foot marks.
24 inches on center so then I would need 40 trusses.
What's that gonna cost me for the trusses?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.