Water Heater Thermostat settings ?

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We just had a new Rheem 50 gal water heater installed. The water was way too high for our needs.
I turned the power off, and took off the plates to the thermostats. Both the upper and lower elements were set at 150 degrees, too hot for us. I set them both at 115 degrees.
But, here is my question... should both the upper and lower elements be set at the same temperature ? I noticed that on our old heater, the upper thermostat was not adjustable, which leads me to wonder if their is an "ideal" setting for the upper element, regardless of the temperature setting of the lower thermostat.
What say ye ??
James
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Below that Legionella thrive and you can catch legionaires disease in the shower. Use a tempering valve if you want to limit the temperature in your pipes (required by law in a lot of areas)
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've never heard of anyone getting Legionnaire's Disease from a home water system or from showering....if it is growing in home water heaters with temps below 150, there should be a hell of a lot of people getting it.
With young children or elderly people, I would not keep the temp higher than about 115.
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On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 18:13:36 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

That's not very good logic.

I'd keep it at 140F, but I tended to teach the kid basic safety. In fact when he was a kid our hot water came directly out of the furnace at closer to 180F.
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Actually, I know someone that had it last year and yes, the water system was supposed to be the culprit. I did not see the results first hand though.
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On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 18:13:36 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

There have been reports in the news lately about a study done in Quebec, I believe - and the incidence is much higher than you may want to believe.
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I keep my water heater around 140 or 150 because I like hot water.
If the Legionnaire's Disease does come from the water heater, what about all the systems that have a storage tank for the well ? All the cold water should be full of the germs. My house has a well and no chemicals are added to the water system. I moved about 5 years ago from where a group of about 10 houses were hooked to a large well and outside storage tank with no chemicals added. Looks like that big storage tank would have been a big breeding ground. Especially in the summer .
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You want to avoid the growth and activity range. * 20 to 50 C (68 to 122 F): Legionellae growth range * Below 20 C (68 F): Legionellae can survive but are dormant
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

So what do YOU do about all water consumed that does not go through the water heater? Piping hot lemonaid? Icemaker conected to hot water side? You take a 150 degree shower with no cold water? Brush teeth and rinse with 150 degree water?
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wrote:

How much of that water sits there breeding bacteria? If the water is kept below (or above) the range where Legionella multiplies, it'll be safe. If it doesn't sit, it'll be safe. I suspect chlorine (city water) helps too, as does (colder) well water.
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Never set them less than 130 as you risk bacteria living in the water heater. Legionellae is a big culprit. Set them both the same.
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On Fri, 26 Feb 2010 23:26:39 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski"

I've had Legionaires.
They come, they eat your food. They won't leave, and they never chip in.
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wrote:

Kinda like family?!
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James wrote:

135 - 140 is good settings.
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I've kept both upper and lower set to 120 for over twenty years. If you don't set the top and bottom to the same temp, then when you shower, after a few minutes or so the temp will change as the hotter/colder water at the top of the tank is used up. I doubt anyone would really notice. If you like hotter water, you can set the upper element to a higher temp, and when you wash your hands and do things that don't use much water, you will get the hotter water. When you bath, the water will cool a bit after a few minutes. Again not sure who would notice.
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James wrote:

140 or 150 anyway? Dishwashers like 140+ also.
s
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On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 07:12:05 -0600, Steve Barker

Safety for smaller children is one reason to limit the temp. Another is energy savings (less lost heat).

All dishwashers have auxilary heaters to heat the water to the proper temperature.

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PeterD wrote:

When I was a child we didn't have all of these silly nanny-minded safety measures, and we turned out fine. If you are stupid, or clumsy, you get burnt. If you fail to learn the lesson, you are probably too stupid to deserve to live anyway.
This is the way it has always been, and by changing this, we are doing a dis-service to future generations of humans.
Jon
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On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 14:42:16 -0800, "Jon Danniken"

Certainly. You have to know how to mount a seat in an outhouse. You could fall in. What was a swimming class, in those days? Thrown into the lake - SWIM!
Way back then children handled guns, drove at 14 years of age or even owned a first car at 12 or 14. You could drive at night with the 16 year old sister in the car (licensed sister).

Kids today never lived before in-door plumbing.
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