Steel I Beams

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Does anyone know what a 8 inch I beam weighs per foot? How far will one span un supported. We are looking at a spanning 40 foot in 2 sections with poured post / piller in the middle for support. 2 X 12 floor joists will be attached.
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In a previous post Raider Bill wrote...

8-inch "W" sections weigh anywhere from 10 lbs/ft up to 67 lbs/ft
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Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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Thanks Bob, Been working on a floor joist plan for the ICF house I want to build this year. 40X50 below grade walkout basement.
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The second number (in imperial designations) is the weight in pounds per linear foot, so a W8x27 is (about) 8 inches deep, and weighs (about) 27 pounds per foot. Similar but different in metric designations.
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MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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In a previous post Michael Bulatovich wrote...

Yes. Nominal depth x wt/ft. The "W" part is a shape designator. There are also "S" and "HP" sections. You may also run across older I-shaped sections with the designation of "WF" or "B".
Metric sections tend to have slightly different profiles -- mostly in the taper of the flanges and in the fillets where the web and flanges meet.
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Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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I was keeping it simple, Bob ; ) The Steel Institute handbook is lying around here somewhere...under something....
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Michael Bulatovich wrote:

If the handbook is lying, I wouldn't trust it./
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Bill in Hamptonburgh, NY To email, delete the double zeroes after @
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Actually I made a mistake. I am spanning 50ft with the steel. Figure to do it in 2 sections with a post/piller. 2X 12's on top for floor joists This will be the floor for a single story ICF home. Aside from the wooden beams is there something better out there besides steel I [w] beams for this. Maybe something lighter.
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In a previous post Raider Bill wrote...

Sounds like you plan (2) 25-foot spans that must support an ICF wall, the floor and a roof load. I suggest you talk to a local engineer to have the support beam properly sized and to review the system of resisting lateral forces.
I'm not trying to run up your costs, but what you are proposing is non- standard construction and most building officials will want to see engineering for the design of such a system.
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Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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That's a mighty big span, pardner.

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Michael Bulatovich wrote:

I'm trying to limit the amount of pillers in the basement shop. Of course if the whole thing collapses it's a moot point.
Bob, "I'm not trying to run up your costs, but what you are proposing is non- standard construction and most building officials will want to see engineering for the design of such a system. "
Fortunatally or un fortunatlly theres no building codes, inspections nothing in this county where I'm building.
The plan is to go ICF up to the first floor, this will be mostly below grade. set the I beams and joists then go ICF up again for the living space. House will be single story ranch syle. I have to have the floor joists in place before backfilling the basement.
With a 40X50 footprint what would you suggest for amount of supports?
Due to location I am limited as to how much weight they will be as getting a crane in there will be almost impossible.
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beam but the old time Egyptians would have thought that was childs play.
You have a couple hundred slaves handy? :)
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Raider Bill wrote:

That's a common early conceptual mistake. Steel posts are cheap. So are column footings. Limiting posts increases the amount of flexural steel you are going to use, and its cost, not to mention increasing the difficulty of handling the heavier section, and dealing with the increased depth of it. If you have to have a clear span, then that's a different story. hehe
You should design for the clear spans that you *need* and no more, unless you've got money to burn.
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In a previous post Raider Bill wrote...

This does not eliminate the need to build to whatever building code standards your state has adopted.

Do the beams have to support the ICF? Or, are the beams to support floor framing only?

You could put a row of posts down the middle and use 16"-18" I-joists to span the 20 feet, then use 3 glu-lam or LVL beam spans of 16'-8" the other way. Wood beam weight is about 350 pounds.
If you want to stay with 2x12 joists then max span for 2x12 DF-L #2 @ 16" o/c is 17'-10" [IRC2003 Table R502.3.1(2)]. So you could use 3 spans of 16'-8" (50') and (2) 20-foot spans for beams. This gets you into a wood beam that is in the 450 pound range. Use (3) 13'-4" beam spans and the wood beam weight drops to less than 200 pounds.

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Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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You might talk to a local truss manufacturer and look at flat wood trusses/ I joists/ etc.that clearspan the entire structure. You will still need to work out details with a structural man and contractor(s). In order to clear span, the joists will need to get deeper which will affect elevations, stairs, etc. This may still be preferable to a steel beam spanning and carrying a load with a single post. The open web joists make it fairly easy to run mechanical systems.
Here is some information: http://www.truss-frame.com/design-flat.html http://www.trusjoist.com/PDFFiles/1045.pdf http://www.ilevel.com/literature/COM-3000.pdf
___________________________ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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Aroung the 6~8 thousand lb capacity. They can extend from about 32 ~ 42 feet, and from 0~80 degrees. Load chart included...............
Dan
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Dan Deckert wrote:

I saw a building going up where they were using wooden beams. To me they looked like 2x4's channeled out and osb inserted. These were 20'. Is there anything extra they do when building these to fortify them or is it what you see is what you get? Seems simple enough to build them but I can't belive they are that simple?
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Raider Bill wrote:

What you see is what you get. They are flimsy laterally until the decking is on, but then they stiffen up nicely and make a good floor. They are essentially an I-beam made of wood rather than steel.
Matt
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Not all of the basement will need to be clearspanned.I will have a mechanical room somewhere near the middle to centralize the A/c and heat runs, plus part of it will be partitioned off for a cleanroom and possibly a storage parts room. I'm thinking maybe 1/3 will have partitions. I think here I will be able to use load bearing walls to hold up the floor joists?
The icf's will not be supporrted by any of this as my first run will go from the footer to the bottom of the window sills. That will be where my cold joint for the second lift of icf;s that will go to the eves and gable tops.
I have scheduled for next year [haha] a trip to Orlando to work with a ICF contracter a few days to get the hang of setting, bracing and pouring them.
On that note, In addition to myself I also have 3 friends one who is a concrete contractor, one a GC and one a framer who is also interested in ICF's that are going with. All are long time friends and skilled tradesmen.
The ICF guy says he has trained several non english speaking crews to use them in less 3 days so he said we should be experts when done. {i'll let you know].
Of course in the planning stage, the concrete friend says pour pillers, the GC says metal posts and the framer says do it all with wood.
Let me add that most of this planning revolves around my back porch and after about a case of Bud things get creative at times.
You guys are the sounding board and all suggestions here are discussed the next evening. The boys are pretty impressed with the info I have been getting here. Thank you.
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Raider Bill wrote:

I looked at ICFs before going with precast concrete. They look easy to use the only real issue is blow-outs when placing the concrete. It looked like those could get interesting...
Matt
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