Please point me to a link with a picture of a valve seating tool

Can anyone please point me to a link with a picture of a tool that someone would be likely using to fix the insides of the leaky (main water shut-off) valve. A valve seating tool. I am searching but cannot find one, and certainly don't know what a real one looks like, yet.
What about using a seating tool to put new seats or seals in the leaky (" gate"?/ - its not a ball valve, theres a steel hand-wheel on it) valve?
I would need to have the water shut off at the street, and call a professional, but can this be done, as suggested elsewhere?
And while on that topic, does this require unthreading the pipe-fitted pipe and removing the valve OR how much room does this tool take to use. Would one spin the valve into an easy orientation or leave it in place at all costs of knocking out drywall(s). I insulated/vapor barriered/drywall/painted beside and behind it and may need to make room. (in the drywall, don't get upset, a hammer would do a rough job - this is why I'm asking) The lower edge of the valve is below the concrete slab grade, and I'll be (loose) laying a tile around the housing before I'm done. Do I need a lawyer? My heating bill was 50% more last year than this year.
For the record I have one water meter, with no shut off valve on it, and one leaky shut-off valve before the meter, closer to the street. The water company says the valve is all my responsibility.
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First you need to turn off water to the faulty valve. Then you need to remove the valve stem complete with handle preferably. Then take the stem to the plumbing supply, HD, or hardware store and ask for replacement seals which match your old ones. The seals get old, dry rot, or become clogged with rust, preventing them from seating completely. If the inside of the valve body is crusty, ask for a seating tool which will match your seat size. If the corrosion isn't bad, just replace the seals and be done with it. You will need to remove the stem and take it with you to match the seals with the correct size and shape. Often a piece of rust will get in there and prevent the seat from seating completely.

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