Nails or screws for old cedar siding?

I'm painting a house I just bought (my very first house), and I have a question:
Several of the old cut-nails used to hold the siding on are loose, and therefore the siding is loose. I'm in the process of sanding now, but when I prime/paint, I want to secure the siding back to the house. Should I use nails or screws?
At first, I thought, "Screws, absolutely." But do I WANT the siding to be able to move around a little on the nail? Vinyl siding is put up loose.
Thanks.
Phil Crow
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Painted siding should not move. Painted siding gets caulked and sealed so that it will not absorb water and moisture and when it is heated by the sun or cooled by the weather it should remain inert. If water happens to get in the siding will swell and shrink like a barometer. I would use screws and stainless type, that have a pre-drill head and possible bugle head with (seat-cleaning threads) these are trim and deck and siding screws. They are expensive. A person can seat these and caulk. If the siding is clap siding or paint stain, it will absorb moisture and tend to work...... If using nails use a rim shank type..... Good luck. jloomis

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jloomis wrote:

No, it should _not_ be caulked (except perhaps at a corner). It is left w/ bottom edges uncaulked specifically so any moisture has a path out rather than pooling and being trapped behind...
For OP, agree a ring-shank siding nail would be fine--depending on the sheathing, make sure you're nailing into something solid--may not be anything solid-enough except at the wall studs if it's a fairly new house. If it's old enough, the sheathing may be solid underneath.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
some sidings are open bottom......ship lap, clapboard, etc. some sidings are not. tongue and groove, and v-rustic.........I guess it depends on what type of siding you are talking about when it comes to caulking. I would not caulk a clapboard or shiplap, but would a t & g or v-rustic.....it is made to be sealed tight..... jloomis

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

T & G if installed right should not be caulked. If it is put on up side down as I have seen, then yes it should be caulked
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jloomis wrote:

Not a one I've ever seen should be caulked...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Maybe what I am talking about is what a painter does when he fill small gaps and spaces and nail marks..... Not that the entire length of the joint should be caulked.... V-Rustic stands alone fine......A heavy bodied paint will seal the joints also.... jloomis

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jloomis wrote:

That's entirely different...

Correct...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Use SS ring shank nails that are made specifically for siding. They are much less ugly than screws and are almost invisible if installed properly. They are soft and will bend if you hit a knot or such, but otherwise drive pretty well.
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok, thanks all. Looks like ring-shanks it is.
Now all I've got to do is get the damn thing painted. Ugh.
Thanks again, Phil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.