Is there any problem with having a narrower eave?

I'm re-roofing my garage and tore off the shingles and facia. Some of the eave support rafters have ends which are rotten half off and were not doing any support. Replacing the rafters would be a major project. Normally these eave rafters support 2 rows of 1x6 planks. I figured on simply trimming the rafters back and removing the first row of planks. This results in narrower eaves and uses less shingles. Is there any problem with having a narrower eave? It seems like a no brainer but I have to ask.
In Southern California
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

Shouldn't present any problems. Lots of houses have no overhang at the eaves to begin with.
-- Dennis
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I wish I had a narrower Eve. Mine weighs around 190 and she's only 5'6" tall.

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lol!
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Moves the dripline closer to the garage.
Decreases the shaded exterior wall area.
Decreases possible lift during high wind conditions.
May affect or eliminate any current eave venting by shortening overhang.
Nothing was said about the gable ends if they exist on your roof type. May be nonexistent if you have a hip roof.
--
Jonny



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The bigger the eave, the more shading you will get on the house at midday, which is passive cooling. Larger eaves usually gives the impression of "higher" quality construction.
You could sister extenstions to the original rafters
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By what standard is this a quality asset?
A big overhang, like a big canopy tree close to the house, is an asset for shading. That is until a really stiff wind comes up. Either can badly damage the house if either come loose. Its a tradeoff, betting on lack of severe inclement weather for the life of the home. The odds are not in favor for most locations.
--
Jonny



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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

Why not just sister 2x's on and bring it back out to where it belongs?
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I think that in Southern California you will actually want to make the eaves wider, not narrower, for reasons provided earlier. After you cut off the rotten ends of the rafters, "sister" new (treated) lumber to the remaining rafter to keep the same eave length, or possibly extend the eave a bit wider. I don't like the silly short exposed 2x4 eaves put on most track homes these days for the problems you have faced. I have built on most of my older home soffett style construction with a solid treated facia board, which allows for better protection of the rafter ends, extends the attic space out over walkways and freeze sensitive plants, and allows for underside eave vents. These soffetts are actually 2x4 knee joints off the ends of the rafter, and nailed against a ledger on the house, eliminating the roof slope on the underside. Before I finished off the underside of these soffetts with siding material, I spanned the bottom members with the aluminium film type radiant foil, which is pretty cheap, to reflect an additional 10% of the summer radiant heat back toward the sun. This does help shade the side of the house from the intense radiant heat we've had lately, and in the winter the freeze sensitive plants fair much better than simply under the usual flimsy eave of a track home. Such a project isn't very expensive nor difficult to do.
Al Bundy wrote:

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