between sheetrock and a hard place

Hi all, I am building a log sided home (stick built). On the interior I am using matched pine so as to give the inside a log look. I am in a kind of weird situation with some firecode sheetrock, a window header, and matched pine. The problem is that I had put up firecode sheet rock for a wood stove right near a window. I now realize that when I want to join the match pine atop the window at the header and meet the sheet rock I have nothing to fasten the matched pine to. See picture.
http://www.geocities.com/guitarage41/matchpine_firecode_sr_windowheader.JPG
Can I put a piece of blocking on the left side of the header so I can nail the pine to it? I am at the extreme limit for the sheetrock as far as fire code goes. I know the headers for windows have to be the way they are.. but to me this seems like I need to have an exception. I could take about a 3/4 of an inch of sheet rock away but it will look funky.
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to that. Should have used more sheetrock to allow a better less visible transition away from the window or perhaps do the whole wall in sheetrock then put pine over the sheetrock leaving sheetrock exposed where the fire code requires it.

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I guess I'm lost.
Are you just wanting a way to nail the pine at the left side of the window head? Most headers, or at least - headers used to be, are made of solid dimension lumber, not I joists. Certainly you can add whatever filler in the header web that you desire. It is often required at the bearing ends of I joists.
You have some bigger issues coming IMHO. How are you planning to deal with window trim? Are you going to have anything on top of the drywall? Are you planning anything at the chimney (straighten it up, hide it) ? Are you planning butt joints in vertical line at window edges? What are you doing for ceiling?
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On Sun, 27 May 2007 21:59:27 -0400, "M"

IMHO that's not rustic, it's sloppy construction. It may look 'rustic' today, but in six months you'll look at it and say "Why did I do that?" And in two years, you'll rip it out, saying over and over "Should have done it right the first time". <g>
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wrote:

Well it has been 4 years and i still like it
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On Mon, 28 May 2007 17:50:53 -0400, "M"

<bg> but you're not done yet! OK, it's your house... I think you got a lot of good ideas in the replies.
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Yes.... so I can affix another 2x8 onto the header? I don't need to have a gap between the finished wall board and the header slab?
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I often frame headers the same way. 1 or 2 2x's oriented vertically, with another 2x6 oriented flat ways on the bottom. The vertical 2 x's are placed to the outside, to allow the assembly to be insulated after the building is dried in. If this is what was done in your case, you will have a space of 2". I'd suggest a few 2x4 blocks ripped to 2" where you need backing. Then insulate that space. I prefer 2" rigid, but fiberglass would be OK.
You've got a lot of work to do to tighten up your vapor barrier.
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M wrote:

You gain nothing in terms of meeting clearance specifications by using the sheetrock rather than the pine. They're both considered combustible.
You have a stick built wall. It's combustible whether you cover it with pine, Sheetrock, or cement board. (Cement board is non-combustible, but it would still transfer the heat to the framing.)
Check the stove and (stove pipe/chimney) specifications for clearance values. You can usually significantly reduce the clearance to the wall by installing a non-combustible panel spaced 1" out from the combustible wall surface. Cement board or sheet metal are commonly used for this along with 1" ceramic spacers. You want to leave gaps at the top and bottom so air can circulate behind the panel.
Have your insurance company and building inspector approve your plan before you continue. (Check your policy -- you're often not covered if you don't declare the stove.) If you don't have a building inspector, try the fire department. This is something you don't want to screw up.
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I have done the above and was told to have sheet rock (firecode) on the wall. It has a large sheet metal plate with the 1" spacers etc. Fire code requires no pine behind the metal plate. Must have 18" of clearance to any combustible surface for uninsulated pipe. 3" of clearance to combustible material with insulated pipe. Yes I talked to all the people you mentioned and followed the code. That is why I am with the sheetrock. I hate the sheet rock but I wanted to be within the limits of the fire codes.
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On Sun, 27 May 2007 18:40:12 -0400, "M"

1. Aim your camera down lower (towards the floor) and reshoot your picture.
2. I'd guess from that picture what you have won't meet code, but I could be wrong. I can't really see where the stove is.
3. Left side? The left side of the sheetrock, and the heater don't seem visible in your image.
4. Looks like all wood above the window, so why not use it? Or is the darker piece behind the pastic vapor barrier set in some? If yes, then use shim pieces to bring it out flush. Maybe a 2x4 sideways (if it fits), or just rip down a 2x4 piece of scrap in your table saw?
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