2x6 Interior Doors

Do you have to special order an interior door for 2x6 framing or do Home Depot type prehung doors have enough adjustable jamb to cover it? Somehow I doubt it but I wouldn't think that 2x6 interior framing is that uncommon?
Thanks for any input.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If you check your yellow pages under "doors", you will find door mills that will gladly supply you with any door you want on any kind of jamb that you want. You will find that they are cheaper than Home Depot. If you insist on HD, you can make jamb extensions to make your door fit your wall. You can buy jamb extensions from real lumber yards or door mills, but it is cheaper to make your own.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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We bought 36"x80" prehung pine doors from Lowes a few years ago. They had doors for 2x4 framing in stock. We had to special order the ones for our 2x6 framing (and one for a swing they didn't have in stock). We only had two interior doors that needed the 2x6 jambs, but the doors came in within a few days.
We finished our pine doors with two coats of amber shellac, first coat straight, sanded lightly, second coat thinned 50% with alcohol. They turned out great.
Anthony
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I thought the usual practice was to thin the first coat to improve penetration into the bare wood. What is the motivation behind your recipe?
Cheers, Wayne
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I have never known of a pro painter who didn't thin both (all) coats but especially the one you want to penetrate.
All painters I know though, have gone to urethane (30 years ago) which is better by far. Gosh, I didn't know you could even buy shellac anymore.
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To be honest, trial and error... :) I had never worked with shellac before, so I had no idea what the "usual" practice was.
I was originally going to use a stain and polyurethane. But I feared all the little crevices in the raised panel doors would tend to trap stain, which would show up if the wood shrunk. The stain also turned out the wrong color on the pine, even with preconditioner.
After trying multiple stains on scraps I cut from the door bottoms, someone on the woodworking newsgroup suggested amber shellac. I applied the first coat straight from the can. The color was nice, it was thin enough to get into all the little crevices, and it didn't hide the woodgrain like stain sometimes does.
Unfortunately, the shellac did leave a very glossy finish. I tried several ideas folks mentioned for rubbing down the shellac, but with 8 doors to finish that would have been a tremendous amount of work.
Through experimentation, I found that a light sanding of the first coat with a flexible sanding block, followed by a thinned down second coat, resulted in a nice satin finish. I tried a straight second coat on scraps, but the finish was too glossy and the color turned too orange. Thinning down the second coat worked perfectly.
It may not be the "proper" way of applying shellac, but we are very happy with the results.
Anthony
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RE: staining. An old trick used for years to "tame down" stain is to put a coat of shellac thinned about 80% or more just to slow the stain up and make it even. Grain still comes out showing but more evenly, no black spots. It soaks into those soft spots more than the harder spots and tends to seal those spots more than the rest. Hence, everything stains evenly.

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