London Town Houses


Two questions:
i) Can anyone give me the approximate floor dimensions of a town house in Great Pulteney Street, Bath, and
ii) are there any town houses of similar floor dimensions (or larger) in London (especially the southwest boroughs of Chelsea, Kensington, Pimlico, Brompton, Knightsbridge, etc.)? Actual street names would be great.
Many thanks for your help.
Regards,
Tim Walters
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08 May 2005, Tim Walters wrote

The key to understanding general sizes of 18th/early 19th townhouses -- given the Bath link, I assume that's what you're interested in -- are the "1st-through-4th-Rate" houses specified under the London Building Acts of that cenetury.
The sizes were fairly standardised (the "rate" referred to rateable value based on size, rather than quality, but the two were obviously linked). I've posted plans for illustrative examples of each type; these are scaled, so you should be able to work out rough dimensions for them:
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/harvey.vansickle/temp/1stRate.jpg
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/harvey.vansickle/temp/2ndRate.jpg
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/harvey.vansickle/temp/3rdRate.jpg
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/harvey.vansickle/temp/4thRate.jpg
HTH.
--
Cheers, Harvey
Architectural and topographical historian
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Great plates. Thanks. TB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Where is, or what was used for a bathroom in these homes?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09 May 2005, Thurston Howell wrote

Baths (which tended to be irregular) were in a moveable bathtub, filled when required.
The toilets -- earth closets and/or chamber pots at this stage; water closets later -- are shown as a small room with a hole in a seat. On the four plans they're marked:
    1st rate - rooms H(ground) and L(1st)     2nd rate - room O     3rd rate - room I     4th rate - room D.
--
Cheers, Harvey
Architectural and topographical historian
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is marvellous! Thank you very much indeed!
I'm particularly interested in the first- and second-rate properties. I understand that some houses were built with two basements. I presume the lower was for storage.
Do you happen to know of houses with this feature in the Chelsea area?
Thanks in advance for any additional input.
Tim
[For email, remove s u b]

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09 May 2005, Tim Walters wrote

Not that I'm familiar with; as far as I know, two basements are very rare in London houses. (I've seen double basements in parts of Windsor Castle -- the lower one used for wine storage -- but that tended to be from sequential building stages -- that is, where an early basement was retained when the building was demolished and the ground level raised.)
For what it's worth, I'd have expected double basements to be found more often in houses built into fairly steep hills (like those around Bath) -- of which there aren't a lot in London!
--
Cheers, Harvey
Architectural and topographical historian
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.