Loews, Costco etc building type details

looking for PLANS/sections/details of some typical big box type of buildings. Vector Works or AutoCad formats ok. Height, column spacing, column/beam connections, roofing, HVAC. WALL SECTIONS esp. important.
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http://groups.google.com/group/alt.building.construction/browse_thread/thread/7fcde27a39e28973 #
R
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He's in way over his head and is too stupid to realize there isn't an easy way out. Either you know the stuff or you don't, fakers will be found out pretty quick.
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Stealing their designs?
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Along with not doing basic Google searches, failing to read replies to their own posts, and, from their history - lacking the good graces to say thank you when someone answers their questions.
I think that behavior qualifies for the Usenet death penalty.
R
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Along with not doing basic Google searches, failing to read replies to their own posts, and, from their history - lacking the good graces to say thank you when someone answers their questions.
I think that behavior qualifies for the Usenet death penalty.
R
True.
I also wonder about the wall sections being esp. important. I have detailed the rebar for many of the Lowe's and Costco's across the country. I have seen them made of poured in place concrete, tilt-up wall panels, CMU, and one Lowe's even used precast double tee's for the walls. I'm not sure what he's looking for but like everything, there are just as many variations as their are buildings.
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..
There are patents for this device going all the way back to 1919 and none of then are code approved. The code requires physical tying of all rebar, at least in Florida. They cut an inspection window in the side of the blocks, lower the rebar down through the block cores from the top of the wall, and tie them through the window. You see, when you pump concrete from above there is a tremendous amount of weight funneling down through the block cores and that little wire device in the article can give-out allowing the rebars to come apart and no one would ever know, until there was a structural failure.
Hey Rebar dood, whats the weight of a 20' long #7 rod? Its got to be more than 100 pounds right?
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Different areas place they bars differently. Here in Georgia they pretty much maintain a 4' grout pour, so the bars range from about 6' for a #4 to 7'6 for a #7. From what I understood about the device, they would slide the bar up only as they built the block wall upward. They should still use the cut out to reach in and tie the bars once they had the proper lap. It seems to me that this is just a device to help from having to lift the bar over the top of the rebar if they tied it in place before lifting the bar. Thankfully, I only work on the detailing end,. and not on the placing. My hand weren't made for manual labor. :-)
No, a #7 bar weights 2.044 lbs/ft do a 20' bar would be just under 41 lbs.
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