2x4 plus 10 inches of EPS vs SIPS

I am in northern Minnesota . I was going to do a SIPS house but live where labor is cheap.
Yet... I don't want to do stick...it's a cabin and the mice will infest it....bats will get into the crawl space.
So..since my local store built his own walk in cooler using thick EPS from Home Depot... I figured I'd put up a slab..use 2x4 versus 2x6...12? inches set back from edge and glue EPS on the stick frame..leaving 3 1/2" for wiring, plumbing, ducting etc. And put plastic then gypsum board on the inside of the 2x4 sticks. When I pour the floor I will also do a "strom closed...6x10 walk in... Iam in tornado country. Then I would glue ext plywood or est strand board over the EPS outside like the laminators and side it or elastomeric stucco it.
Oh... I will have to pay for a SIPS roof or..maybe I will put trusses in ..put moisture sheet over that, then EXT plywood then glue 6" EPS then more plywood then steel roof.
What do you think?
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Guntoter
Consider using ICF (Insulated Concrete Forms). It won't be that much more than SIPS and it doesn't blow down when a storm comes through (99% tornado proof). It doesn't rot, or grow mold and mildew. Also it is perfect for a "safe room". AND there will be no mice or bats in the walls.
for more information go to www.nudura.com or www.futurestone.com

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Guntoter wrote:

Really...I'm in MN and labor isn't cheap anywhere... at least not labor you'd be willing to pay for. (You can find guys who don't know what they're doing cheap)...

You're going to have a HUGE thermal bridge at the slab, unless you detail it right. Do SIPs...they're same price as 2x6 walls, pre-cut doors/windows.
I think your method isn't going to work nearly as well as you think its going too...

SIPs all around. You COULD do ICFs for the walls, but you'll pay more.
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You will pay more for the ICF... over a wood frame house you'll pay $7 to $10 more for the cost of the house... view it as an upgrade... one that will actually pay you in energy savings. It won't be even that much more than SIPS.

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abarr wrote:

Think before you speak. There's pretty good evidence that ICFs are better in warm climates than cold. It's a question of thermal mass. In a cold Minnesota climate a long stretch of cold weather will eventually cool down the mass of the wall (unless you've doubled the exterior insulation). Then, you're working against this thermal mass. SIPs don't suffer from the same problem as they have very little thermal mass.
SIPs can be easily field modified, added to, changed, etc. ICFs, not so much.
Having said that, I just did a house using Nudura ICFs, so I'm not totally biased against ICFs. It's a question of evaluating the project and finding what's the best solution. For the ICF house, we're doing a green roof, which means lots of load bearing at the walls, so ICFs were the way to go to get the bearing we needed.
But usually, I prefer SIPs...
P
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Got any good links on the stuff? I poked around, but can't understand how these things stand up, or are finished on the interior.
--


MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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Michael Bulatovich wrote:

ICFs or SIPs?
Either one can be finished just like you'd finish anything else. ICFs do have the advantage of being able to install EIFS directly to the exterior foam (if you call that an advantage)...
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SIPs
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Michael Bulatovich wrote:

It depends on the finish:
Wood siding: (2) layer 15# felt, stagger seams. Finish all sides of siding prior to installation (seal end cuts).
Hardiplank type: Either (2) layers of 15# felt, stagger seams or appropriate building wrap (this is where it gets tricky...gotta get the right stuff for the application and there's a lot of crap out there).
Stucco: (2) layer 15# felt, stagger seams. Wire lath, rest of system. EIFS: (2) layers 15# felt preferred, STO spray OK, and last option Stuccowrap, then EIFS system.
Vinyl: Building Wrap, the vinyl.
All installations with good detailing at penetrations/windows/doors.
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All that I get. I'm asking about the *interior*.
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Michael Bulatovich wrote:

Screw in drywall (I hate nailed in drywall- nail pops always show up). Be done. No VB if installed correctly. One nice thing is that you have some OK blocking ready to go everywhere there is a SIP.
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wrote:

I still like my plan. Because, I forgot to mention that south, east and west ext walls are mostly glass. ICF not worth the trouble for one wall. Pure SIPS not worth it when I am putting in mostly glass on three walls anyway. Roof is 4 foot overhang East, west and south.... 8 1/2 ft walls .......triple pane fixed glass, . sliding glass doors and small awning windows down low in East, South, West walls will give interior air flow.
...probably standard double hungs in the north wall.
The storm closet WILL likely be ICF......I prefer .ARXX from Canada at this point.
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Before you use ARXX look at NUDURA. I'm pretty sure you will find it is quicker and easier. goto www.nudura.com

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