What is it? CL

This week's set has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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861. "Hayhook" When hay is loaded onto a truck or trailer with pitchforks, it lays flat. You shove this hayhook deep into the load and pull the two short handles up inside of the frame. This locks a certain amount of hay in. The hay is then hoisted with rope and pulleys to its desired position. This was usually done with truck, tractor or even horses. A rope which is connected to the two short levers is then yanked. The hay falls straight down. The hay is then distributed to various locations to make the hay as evenly distributed as possible in the loft. This helps prevent "hot spots".
The hayhook that we used in my youth was shaped a little differently. But all parts are identical in terms of function and purpose. I wiped a little sweat off my brow remembering those days.
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860. From the inscription something to with height or altitude. Obviously it converts a reading from something into something else. Maybe barometric pressure into height above sea level.
861. For hoisting hay bales into barns.
862. Can't quite see whether the things the arms move are paddles or chopping blades. However I think they just push the wooden cover in the tub down alternately onto whatever is filling it underneath. Maybe an early clothes washing machine.
863. Looks like they might collect water running down the lines. Can't imagine why though.
864. Looks like it times how long it takes something to move along the upper scale. What though seeing as that's maybe not present. The scale reads down to up so it seems the timer should rise. Does that mean something in the base lifts up?
865. Laser distance meter. -- Dave Baker Puma Race Engines www.pumaracing.co.uk Camp USA engineer minces about for high performance specialist (4,4,7)
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Hmmm... looks to me like the left side of the 'front' table might be in °C (0 to 40°C = 32 to 104°F). The 'rear' table left side looks more like zoomed in comfort zone close up... ( equaling 42.8 to 81°F)
The analog scale at the end seems to have something to do millimeters, as do the tops of both tables.
I keep thinking something to do with adjusting control cable tension... but not sure.
Can anyone translate what the analog end text says?
Erik
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Erik wrote:

RH, how about a close up of the text? It looks like it says "2/5 de m/m par haute", which is technically nonsensical, directly translating from french to say "2/5 of m/m by high", but it looks like there's some additional letter(s) at the end of 'haute'.
I wonder if it originally had some sort of slider over the top of it with a hairline that made a horizontal bar across the numbers. That would allow someone to set the vertical scale at some value, then look across to the horizontal scale (as determined by the pointer) to make some sort of adjustment.
RH, closeups of the sides also, please? To see if there are any scratches or wear marks?
--riverman
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On 1 Jan 2007 11:16:41 -0800, "humunculus"

Hi riverman,
I'm no expert with the French language, but what you posted is more-or-less what I came up with too ("2/5 of m/m by high"). I messed around for a while searching on this with different combinations and came up with nothing. Here are the translations I came up with:
de = of; from par = a; per; by haute = high; height
The scales/grid are almost too simple to be of much use, unless you were suppose to lay something over top of them. It would be interesting to know if they are accurate to any common units like mm.
I would be interested in seeing a side view of the slide too and to know how easy the slide moves (like will it stay put in one place once moved, or can it just as easily flop around). It didn't look like the slide lined up with the grid scale in any sort of way to the images.
Another thought too, maybe the item came from a French speaking area of Canada? It kinda has a wood/logging scale tool look to me (shrug).
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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Leon Fisk wrote:

Hmm, another clue/observation: it looks like the distance that the little side bar travels (from the bottom to the top of the chart) is the same physical distance as the 'pointer' sweeps across the top of the tool: I bet its just an L-shaped piece of metal, not something geared.
I wonder if we are looking at it wrong: the little bar isn't the handle...its a lever. And the pointer is the handle: when the 'pointer' is furthest to the left ('10'), then 2/5 of 10 is 4, and the little side bar is at the 40. If we read that as 4.0 rather than 40, then the position of the side bar always corresponds to 2/5 of the position of the 'pointer'.
My guess is that there WAS some sort of cover that was connected to the side bar. The user slid the 'pointer' to some position that corresponded to something, and the side bar moved the cover (with a crosshair?) to give a calibration of some sort.
Hmmm, I hate mysteries like this.
--riverman
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I think the last letter is a "U", the closest shot of this text that I have was the link on my site, same as this one:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%205/pic860b.jpg

The slider idea sounds like a good possibility. I took the photos of this tool at an auction and didn't take any of the sides, just the front and back. It was in a box lot and they had no description of it. I've been doing some searching on it but haven't had any luck yet.
Rob
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I wonder if the word isn't "hauteur"?
This link <http://filaman.ifm-geomar.de/Glossary/Glossary.cfm?TermEnglish=hauteur % 2C%20profondeur> suggests a measurement of a fish's body height.
Perhaps it's some sort of gauge for determining whether a fish is legal to keep.
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Here is the largest photo that I have that shows the end of the word, doesn't appear to be an R after the U, clicking on the image should make it bigger:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%205/pic860s.jpg
And a larger shot of the other side:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%205/pic860t.jpg
The needle was spring returned to the zero position, and it took light pressure on the small rod to move it. The photos that are on my site were cleaned up, especially the front side; the pictures on the links above are unmodified, notice the dark dots in the graph and by the numbers, I don't think they're meaningful, but someone was asking about wear marks so I thought they might want to see the unaltered photos.
I've got a couple emails that I plan to send to some tool collectors in the next day or two concerning this tool, hopefully one of them will recognize it.
Rob
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R.H. wrote:
notice the dark dots in the graph and by the numbers, I don't

Could the scale on the side be a calibration chart, similar to that used on RF components today?
http://www.torontosurplus.com/rfp/DATA1260.JPG
Kevin Gallimore
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On Mon, 1 Jan 2007 16:10:05 -0500, "R.H."

Hi Rob,
I suspected that was your only pictures at this time. Thanks for updating us on that.
I searched for anything related to scaling lumber that might look like this and didn't find anything of interest. Of course I've played out a bunch of other ideas too :)
It looks/feels like something from around 1900 or maybe even earlier, but I have no basis for that.
I kinda like Riverman's idea that there was something that slid over the top of the scale/grid area and this engaged with the slide on the side. The scale on the back side though has a slight angle to the horizontal lines. Not sure if that is significant or not.
"m/m" is also an abbreviation for "by mass," used in chemistry and pharmacology to describe the concentration of a substance in a mixture or solution. 2% m/m means that the mass of the substance is 2% of the total mass of the solution or mixture.
Maybe that bit of trivia will help somebody else and maybe not...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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Dave Baker wrote:

Funny you would say that. My first thought was that it looked strangely like the back of a Kane Dead Reckoning Computer my dad had when I was a kid. Maybe this is some sort of elementary navigation device? Here is a link to the Kane DR Computer, showing the back.
http://www.squarecirclez.com/blog/kane-dead-reckoning-computer/391
--riverman
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861 Hay hook
863 Weights to keep the power lines steady in the wind.
865 Thermometer. Usually reads up to 600° f. has a laser light to aim where you are reading the temp.
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where
It would be a curious thermometer that had "distance = spot x 12:1" printed on the side of it. -- Dave Baker Puma Race Engines www.pumaracing.co.uk Camp USA engineer minces about for high performance specialist (4,4,7)
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printed
But that is indeed what it is. Search for Mastercool.
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I use one all the time in checking temperature while curing the ink while screen printing.
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Dave Baker wrote:

If I'm measuring the temperature of a certain part of an engine, I don't want the "spot" to be so big it includes other parts. 12:1 tells me how close I must hold the thermometer.
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# 862-----A chopper for chopping cabbage to make sauerkraut.
R.H. wrote:

--

Richard


Richard L. Rombold
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861 "hay fork" used to put loose hay into the barn. Works with a rail at the roof peak that has a trolley running on it.
863 Stabilizer weight to keep the lines from whipping in the wind. Spoils the natural resonance of the span.
865 Non contact thermometer.
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