Machining In The Living Room aka A Lathe In A Desk


I am looking for ideas for how to design and build a desk/bench/storage cabinet for a Sherline/Taig lathe/mill (metalworking tools but this would work for small wood working tools also) that will reside in a living room.
I have seen the examples shown at the Sherline site (www.sherline.com) but I am still looking for ideas.
I am trying to have a functional workspace when open and an attractive piece of furniture when it is closed.
Any suggestions, comments, links AND ESPECIALLY PICTURES are appreciated.
Thanks in advance,
TMT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
rec.crafts.metalworking
AAvK
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The AAvK entity posted thusly:

Dunno about the Sherline, but the Taig can be had set up for wood-turning, and can even be easily switched. While this does not make "Machining" on-topic, the fact that at least a few woodworkers have small lathes in similar situations, does.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dunno about the Sherline, but the Taig can be had set up for wood-turning, and can even be easily switched. While this does not make "Machining" on-topic, the fact that at least a few woodworkers have small lathes in similar situations, does. "
You will note that I made the subject on topic by mentioning that this could be used for woodworking also.
A wood lathe, carving, model building, doll houses, etc....they all need a work area and storage if done in shared living quarters with others.
Any recommendations for the furniture needed to make this happen?
TMT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"rec.crafts.metalworking
AAvK "
Thanks for the response but I am looking for ideas as to what to buy or build for the furniture to hold the tools (which can also do wood turning and routing).
Any suggestions as to what would work well for work surface and storage in a home living area?
TMT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Too_Many_Tools wrote:

Modify this: http://www.capitolmuseum.ca.gov/virtualtours/capitol/html/links/link331.html
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Look at foldout desks, bars, and spring loaded sewing machine platforms.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Look at foldout desks, bars, and spring loaded sewing machine platforms. "
I also considering sewing machine cabinets and armoires....any links or pictures to look at?
TMT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Any more suggestions?
Does anyone do any woodworking in their living quarters? If so, I would think the same requirements would apply.
Any suggestions for workbenchs that would live covetly in a living room so the SO is happy?
TMT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Too_Many_Tools" wrote...

A drop-front desk or a cylinder desk could easily be made to house a baby lathe.

A sofa table with a removable "fancy top" and work top under would work - like the hay they used to make gaming tables for the parlor. Looks like a fancy table, but the top lifts off and there's the workbench. Make it with stout turned farmhouse legs and it will be plenty solid enough.
-- Timothy Juvenal www.rude-tone.com/work.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27 May 2006 09:53:35 -0700, "Too_Many_Tools"
I don't know if you've done any machining with that lathe yet, but I hope you know how much of a mess it'd make in a living room. When I got my midi (wood) lathe, I kept it in a breezeway that was about 4' x 6' and that worked pretty well for chip containment, but when I bought my house and put it and my larger lathe in the shop, it was such a mess on everything that I ended up needing a separate room dedicated to turning, just so I could clean adequately without moving everything around every time I looked at the lathe.
I know that's not encouraging, I just have a vision of the coolant-covered swarf either stuck to the carpet or gouging up hardwood floors. Not to mention sitting down on nice curly razors stuck into the upholstry from time to time.
If you need to do it (and that's just how it is sometimes)- how about making a good-sized armoire with doors that lock open at 90* with a flip-up "ceiling" extension and one of those plastic mats they make for rolling computer chairs on carpet to protect the floor from the shavings? You could attach a bit of plastic to the edge of the flip up part so it would hang down and make a cover behind you. With coolant, they're a mess- without coolant, they're even worse! Anywhere a chip can get out, it will get out- and that includes stuck in the treads of your boots. If you're not sure what I'm describing, let me know and I'll e-mail you a drawing off-list.
Alternately, if you've got enough room in the living room and can modify the building yourself, the best solution may be to frame up a closet in one corner, and put a door with some weather stripping on it.

I used to- but it's really not the same as metalworking. Worst case senario, I usually would hang plastic from floor to ceiling to make a temporary work area, and put a box fan in the window to blow dust outside. The difference is that sawdust and wood shavings are fairly soft, and not very likely to wreck the floors or furniture. Though I haven't seen your place- for all I know, you have wooden walls and concrete floors. If that's the case, just put a dropcloth over the furniture and have at it.

As another poster suggested- a false top should work nicely for that one. Make a nice demi-lune workbench, and your wife can call it a sideboard.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the response...it is appreciated.
I am more than a bit surprised that there is so little interest in this subject....doesn't anyone do any craft type work in the living area of their homes? Whether it is metal/wood working, craving, modeling, etc. I would think there would be an interest in the challenge of designing furniture to meet the challenge.
the points you raise are good ones. I especially like the part...
"how about making a good-sized armoire with doors that lock open at 90* with a flip-up "ceiling" extension and one of those plastic mats they make for rolling computer chairs on carpet to protect the floor from the shavings? You could attach a bit of plastic to the edge of the flip up part so it would hang down and make a cover behind you. "
...very good approach towards containment.
With housing getting more and more expensive and the houses getting smaller and smaller, I would think more people will be forced to doing shopwork in the living room...it sure beats what is on television these days.
TMT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Too_Many_Tools wrote:

I don't think that there is little interest. There are conflicting interests. SWMBO being conflict numero uno. I have a hard enough time persuading that a TV can in fact go in the living room. Broaching the subject of bringing work into the living space would translate as, "I'd like to start filling the house with dust and if you wouldn't mind cleaning it up after me, that would be great."
If you don't have a SWMBO, well, hell, keep the motorcycle in the living room.
I posted the Wooton desk as an example of something that could easily be adapted to housing a small shop for craftwork and the like. A huge amount of storage in an unusual piece of finished furniture. You may also want to Google jeweler's desk as there are some interesting examples of that type. http://www.thesecurityexchange.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=appraisal.public&item_ID 294&Refr=GB
You'd have to incorporate an efficient dust collection system into the desk to make its place in a living area feasible.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When I was much younger I kept a 1978 Harley Low Rider in my living room . . . the first wife was not the domestic goddess type . . .There were some problems though . . . After a couple hours of riding the "cooling" down period tended to make the living room a tad bit warm . . . Also the carb tended to drip a few drops of fuel on the carpet . . . did you know that will melt right through to the padding . . . also oil will penetrate an old copy of Popular Mechanics eventually and that also is rough on the carpet . . . . But you know ten plus years later when I sold it still looked brand new . . .

http://www.thesecurityexchange.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=appraisal.public&item_ID 294&Refr=GB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"When I was much younger I kept a 1978 Harley Low Rider in my living room . . . the first wife was not the domestic goddess type . . .There were some
problems though . . . After a couple hours of riding the "cooling" down
period tended to make the living room a tad bit warm . . . Also the carb tended to drip a few drops of fuel on the carpet . . . did you know that will melt right through to the padding . . . also oil will penetrate an old copy of Popular Mechanics eventually and that also is rough on the carpet . . . . But you know ten plus years later when I sold it still looked brand new . . . "
The house or the Hog? ;<)
TMT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Too_Many_Tools wrote:

Or the wife?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RicodJour wrote: <Snip>

<End Snip>
Yup!
Truth is it's a struggle convincing SWMBO to let me keep machines in the garage. I'd be better off putting a bullet in my head before I go recommending the living room.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 28 May 2006 09:46:58 -0700, "Too_Many_Tools"

I thought it was a troll. Where do you fix your motorbike? In the bedroom?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
">I am more than a bit surprised that there is so little interest in this

I thought it was a troll. Where do you fix your motorbike? In the bedroom? "
Nope, no troll....trying to get ideas before I build the furniture needed to be able to do work while watching television, listening to radio, etc.
Where do I fix my motorbike? Anywhere I want to. ;<)
TMT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Before I inherited my fathers house a few years ago when he passed on, I lived in a 1-bedroom apartment for almost 15 years.
During thos e days, I started to get interested in woodworking again with the initial project being a large corner desk for my PC and all it's goodies.
During the construction of that desk, I had to buy all the various tools i'd be needing, including the usual Biscuit joiner, routers, sanders, dovetail jig, etc including a table saw. I ended up buying a Dewalt DW744 contracter model so I could put it in teh bedroom closet in between projects and haul it out to the dining room when I needed to use it.
It worked out quite well.
I ended up building the original corner desk, another desk to sit beside it, another even larger main desk, as well as a roll around tool chest for all my hand tools.
Everything was made out of Oak, and the finish was brushed on. No spray painting.
Never got a single complaint from any of the neighbors about the noise. I just used common sense to use the more noisey tools during the daytime or early evening and not for prolonged amounts of time.
Sawdust? not a real problem, used a shop vac after every use as well as just happening to have light brown carpeting....
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.