Workshop dehumidifier

One of my Hotpoint workshop dehumidifiers appears to have just died - at just the time when I've also using the conservatory for extra space, so will really need another one too.
It's running, but getting warm rather than cold, so I suspect a terminal degassing in some unfixable manner.
Any suggestions for favoured models to replace it? I'm looking for reliability over a good few years, more than a quick bargain.
Thanks
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On Monday, October 15, 2012 5:02:50 PM UTC+1, Andy Dingley wrote:

the time when I've also using the conservatory for extra space, so will really need another one too.

Who here uses enough of them over enough years to know?
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On Monday, 15 October 2012 18:19:52 UTC+1, (unknown) wrote:

I'm hoping to at least find out that I shouldn't buy a Lucky Golden Hedgehog, as they fail within a year.
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I got 3 from homebase, probably almost 10 years ago, which get trundled around the family when someone needs one. They were 75% off in a store which was closing down. They are New Widetech Industries Co., Ltd, who I think mostly make OEM models for other people. Mine happen to look exactly like an Ebac model, but this model is obsolete now. The rating plate says 400W, but they actually draw 250W (although the compressor switch-on surge can blow 5A fuses).
All 3 get lots of use (in clothes drying cupboards, mainly). One of them had an early failure on the simple control circuit board - a zener diode failed, which I chose to fix myself rather than go through the warranty. The other issue is that the defrost cycle is not very good about kicking in soon enough, and when operating below about 13C, they can end up with the evaporator encased in a solid block of ice, and once this happens, the defrost cycle can't thaw it out. I worked around this with one of them which operates in colder conditions so that if the temperature is below 15C, it switches off for 5 seconds every 30 minutes, as whenever it starts up, it runs a defrost cycle for the first 3 minutes anyway, and this is enough to keep it from forming a solid block of ice. Max ambient operating temperature is 30C, and in a drying cupboard you can manage this by plugging in via a thermostat which cuts off above 30C.
These have water tanks, but can be plumed-in instead - something you might want to consider.
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Andrew Gabriel
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"Andy Dingley" wrote in message

If it's a small workshop, a fridge or freezer with the condensate drain run outside works quite well. No good if it's a barn though.
AWEM
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