wood primer

Hi
I know nothing. If I strip the paint off some exterior woodwork and repaint with undercoat & gloss, presumably I should use primer first? If so, what ones are good and whats carp? I need this one to last as long as poss, expense almost no object. Ideally one that screwfix sell :)
Regards, NT
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Personally, I'm a Dulux Trade fan, even if it does involve a few solvents in some of the layers (I prefer water based paints). If down to bare wood:
1 x Dulux Trade Weathershield Exterior Preservative Primer 2 x Dulux Trade Weathershield Exterior Flexible Undercoat 1 x Dulux Trade Weathershield Exterior Quick Drying Satin
If you prefer alkyds to acylics, replace the last with Dulux Trade Weathershield Exterior High Gloss. That would technically give you 8 years instead of 6, but looks crap (I hate high gloss!)
Christian.
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On Mon, 31 May 2004 00:31:29 +0100, Christian McArdle wrote:

Each to their own, I guess. I used Weathershield some years ago on my last place. Stripped back to bare wood, primed, two u/c, and two gloss coats - the 'gloss' wasn't, it was more of a sheen, and the whole lot lasted three years and started flaking off and had to be replaced with an oil-based paint that at least lasted for four years before it needed a repaint. Personally I wouldn't touch the stuff, but in the end you pays your money and takes your choice.
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If you need it to last, I'd forget paint altogether for the first coat. Use either a proprietary wood hardener or fibreglass resin. No paint on earth will survive long on degraded wood but, if you start with a solid surface, pretty much any paint will. All the garbage churned out by Dulux about longevity means nothing unless you know how good the substrate is, and they will always blame this in the event of a claim. Would be interesting to know precisely how they carry out their tests.
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Which usually do tests on paint each year, although I haven't seen a recent one.
They paint identical surfaces and leave them exposed on a south facing Yorkshire Moor. There is a variation between brands, but none seem to have that magical solution of making exposed paint last more than 3 years or so.
--
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Suggests that Dulux are measuring the longevity of the paint film in isolation, and Which the length of time the paint can prevent the substrate (presumably wood) from degrading to the point where it can no longer support the film.
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Yup. Maker's claims, as we know from IMM's many many posts, rarely tell the full story of use in real world conditions. I'd expect Which to take as much care as possible that the samples of wood they used were as near identical as practical, given that they are providing a paid for service to their members, not trying to push one product against another.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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From: wanderer ( snipped-for-privacy@tesco.net)

gloss
with
needed
What would you use? Pliolite? I dont care whether the finish is gloss or satin, but I do need maximum life and dont mind paying for it. I once proposed using car spray paint, but was told it wouldnt survive the movement of the wood. Its for exterior wood windows.
Regards, NT
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On 31 May 2004 17:03:24 -0700, N. Thornton wrote:

Well, personally, I'd stick with an oil-based paint, but as to how long it lasts rather depends on the aspect of the windows, the care taken with the painting and preparation and probably most important, the quality of the timber used in making the windows. IF they're made with poorly seasoned timber, then it makes little difference how much effort you put into trying to get a decent and long-lasting finish.
If they're all more or less northerly then you might get 5 or 6 years before it looks tatty, but if southerly and exposed to plenty of direct sunlight, it'll probably start to look tatty in about 3 years, and definitely in need of repainting in 5 years.
As to preparation, I'd definitely use some Rustins Knotting if necessary, nothing like a bleeding knot after a couple of years to spoil the finish! Have you got a Crown Decorator Centre near you? Probably be as good a place as any to ask for advice about the best durability of paint types.
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On 31 May 2004 17:03:24 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk (N. Thornton) wrote:

If you *really* don't care about the finish then consider bitumous floor paint. I used some on a roofing job a while back and had some left over.
A water-butt lid needed making and the only material I had to immediate hand was 1/2 inch Stirling board. It had a couple of coats of the "bitty" paint top and bottom and several coats around the exposed edges. I was expecting it to delaminate fairly soon but it stands up to the weather without noticeable deterioration, there's often water lying on the upper side and when the butt overflows the underside is in contact with the water. Small amounts of water tend to bead rather than pool on it. Quite resistant to wear as well.
Quite easy to apply and gave a nice even finish.
Limited range of colours though ...
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(N. Thornton) wrote:

If it came in white I'd do it. But putting white on top is going to be more or less impossible. I dont think the place would look good in black, wouldnt suit it at all. Sounds like theres no magic solution. :(
Regards, NT
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On 31 May 2004 17:03:24 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk (N. Thornton) wrote:

Hi,
What's the problem with the existing coating, is it flaking off? If so how about one of the high quality Sadolin variants in white.
cheers, Pete.
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yup, all falling off. And its exposed, and gets full sun.
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On 1 Jun 2004 12:47:22 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk (N. Thornton) wrote:

Another possibility is to prime the wood with epoxy, though if the wood underneath gets wet, it's a recepie for rot.
cheers, Pete.
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