Wiki:Oven

Feedback welcome
NT
==Supply circuit=Whether an oven can go on a mains plug or needs it own high current circuit depends on its power consumption. Any oven upto 3kW can go on a 13A mains plug.
Generally speaking, * all in one cookers with oven & hob need their own high current supply * single cavity ovens with no hob rings are fine on a mains plug * Exceptions do exist, check the ratings plate for power consumption if in doubt.
==Cleaning=The big issues are grease and burnt grease. Bulk grease can be removed with crumpled newspaper first.
Parts that can be removed can be dishwashed, or if no dishwasher is available, cleaned as hot as possible. Dishwashing eliminates grease and can remove a fair amount of burnt on grease as well.
Oven parts that can't be removed are best cleaned with caustic soda solution. This needs heat for full effect. Its a good way to destroy grease, but isn't one of the safest chemicals to handle.
Glass in oven doors can be scraped to remove a lot of muck, but avoid a steel scraper that will scratch the glass. Copper scourers work.
Don't forget to clean the glass lamp cover occasionally, or muck blocks most of the light out.
==Repair=Many parts are fairly straightforward to replace if fried * Elements * Fan motors * Switches * Wires with crimped conectors
Usually pattern parts from 3rd party manufacturers are available.
Thermostats can also be replaced, but aren't as easy.
==Light bulbs=Light bulbs designed for oven use are rated for high temperature, and have hardened glass shells to reduce risk of breakage, and possible consequent contamination of food with glass. Its possible to use ordinary appliance lamps instead, but they tend not to last as long, they're cheaper and they're not toughened glass. These are usable where the cooker has a glass cover over the lamp, but not safe to use without the cover.
CFLs aren't an option for oven use.
==Energy efficiency=* If you're concerned about energy use, filling the oven with food uses about the same energy to cook a lot more food in one go. * Very old ovens have no insulation * Some foods only need a minority of the ingredients cooking, the rest can be added without any further cooking. * Microwaving is much more energy efficient with most foods * All canned foods are already cooked. * Electric slow cookers use less energy, and are good for some meal types.
==Oven types====Convection oven==The traditional oven, heat is conducted around the cooking cavity by convection. The result is a lot of temperature variation.
==ϊn oven==These produce a more or less even temperature distribution all round the oven, and give the same cooking result with a slight reduction in temperature. The fan motor creates noise.
===Small cookers==Small all in one cookers such as the Baby Bellings are fairly popular in one bed accomodation. They're small, portable, run on a mains plug, and cook satisfactorily, as long as you don't need a full size oven.
Total power consumption for the oven plus 2 rings is normally over the 13A limit, so the power delivery is interlocked to prevent all parts being on at once. Typically this means the last ring only powers up when the oven element isn't operating. Thus with the oven off it works normally, but with the oven on it switches on and off as the oven element goes on and off, giving less heat.
===Mini oven==Small plug-in desktop ovens were somewhat popular in the 90s. More or less all of these have terrible performance, and aren't often a good choice.
===Combination oven==These can microwave as well as convection or fan cook. All but the earliest ones can do both at the same time, giving faster cooking with less energy use, and the dry browned finish of traditional cooking.
===Non-thermostatic ovens==Very few of these are in use, but they have been spotted. Very old pre- thermostatic ovens have a few power settings, and are designed to maintain cooking temperature on the lowest power setting. Higher power settings are only for quick warm up. Cooking on medium tends to produce charcoal. If you must use one of these things, an oven thermometer can tell you what's going on; knowing what temp it cooks at on low makes all the difference to usability.
===Range==Usability depends on oven temperature, which depends on fuel type and technology. Historic solid fuel ranges tend to have no thermostat and often unworkably low oven temperatures.
The always on aspect of ranges is much appreciated by some, eliminating warm-up times.
===Preheating==Ovens are mostly preheated before food is put in to cook. Doing this is optional, with virtually all foods cooking fine in an oven not preheated. The time the food's in is longer, but its ready very slightly sooner than preheating.
==Ring / hob types====Spiral==* Quick heat up, good temperature controllability * Muck builds up under the spiral and can catch fire * Line the space underneath with ali foil, then it can be cleaned by replacing the foil * The oldest ring type still in use
===Metal Plate==* Safer than spiral * Slow to heat and not very good temperature control
==Ξramic==* Flat flush surface * Relatively easy to clean * Food burnt onto the surface sticks, everything else wipes off with cream cleaner
===Halogen==* Dark bottomed pans required to absorb the heat * Easier to clean than ceramic * Halogen radiators need replacement eventually
===Induction==* Only work with some metal pan types * Easier to clean than ceramic
===Live element rings==These historic rings are rarely seen, but are still very occasionally found. If you're looking for minimum cost cooking equipment, beware.
These are normally a single plug-in ring with an unusual type of heating element. Instead of the element being a metal block or a spiral, its a ceramic tray with grooves in, and in these grooves sits a spiral of bare live heating wire. Any spillage of cooking water onto the element can make the cooking pan live, resulting electric shock. The shock can cause a boiling water spill, adding burn injury. It also creates a conductive path from heating element to case, which usually doesn't make anything live, but can in some cases.
These are still used in some countries for cost reasons.
One question: paint stripper for stainless steel parts, it works to remove burnt grease, but is there a reason it shouldn't be used?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In message

I would say that it strays from DIY to Delia and contains a lot of what is bleedingly obvious
e.g.
">===Small cookers== >Small all in one cookers such as the Baby Bellings are fairly popular >in one bed accomodation. They're small, portable, run on a mains plug, >and cook satisfactorily, as long as you don't need a full size oven."
well, yes but so what
nothing snipped below, but nothing added

--
geoff

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Might be worth mentioning catalytic linings in the cleaning section - don't do any of the cleaning methods you mention on them.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 16:58:36 -0800 (PST), NT wrote:

I feel it needs something about total ring loading. Probably OK if the kitchen has it's own ring might start to get interesting if the kitchen is part of another ring or if the property only has one ring. 3kW oven, 3kW kettle there is 6kW of your maximum 7.5(ish)kW ring load. OK the kettle is only a relatively short duration but...
--
Cheers
Dave.




Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
NT wrote:

Dual-fuel cookers with two ovens may require a 32 A supply.

The special oven liners should neither be dishwashed nor treated with caustic soda.

Convection ovens, as advertised currently, use fans.

The Baby Belling I retired earlier this week, does not function in that way - if the oven or grill is in use, the large ring does not operate at all.

Many of the newer counter-top ovens work very well - de Longhi, for instance, have some excellent models.

On my Rayburn, I can divert heat to the oven by adjusting panels within the firebox.

With a fan oven, preheating is often unnecessary. Cakes and puff pastry do not appreciate going into a cold oven.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 16:58:36 -0800, NT wrote:

=============================================== I think that an article on ovens should at least mention *gas* ovens since they're quite common.
Cic.
--
=================================================
Using Ubuntu Linux
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26 Nov, 10:54, Cicero wrote:

No, they are interlinked as noted by S Viemeister, but there are 2 versions - one with the interlink for 13A, and one without for 32A.

And ukfdm wouldn't less this pass without mention of Remoska!
Owain
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Would that this were true. I've run bits of the oven and extractor hood round 2 or 3 times and they're still greasy.
--
I do not like to talk to priests. Disposing of the bodies is so inconvenient.
[email me, if you must, at huge huge (dot) org <dot> uk]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
anon wrote:

I wonder why, I've never had oven parts come out still greasy. You sure there isnt a machine problem?
NT
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've had this when using dishwasher tablets. Not when using liquid dishwasher detergent though (which always seems to me to work much more effectively than expensive tablets, not to mention that you can dose it according to load).
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We use (Sainsburys) powder.
--
Not recommended for the clergy of desert monotheisms.
[email me, if you must, at huge huge (dot) org <dot> uk]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 27, 10:01 pm, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

For the possible benefit of the anonymous contributor, even with scrooge brand tablets I haven't had it happen, and the separates are better at cleaning.
NT
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK, feedback points addressed, article expanded, and renamed to 'Cooker.' Any more feedback welcome
NT
Cooker
==Supply circuit== Whether an electric oven can go on a mains plug or needs it own high current circuit depends on its power consumption. Any oven upto 3kW can go on a 13A mains plug.
Generally speaking, * all in one cookers with oven & hob need their own high current supply * single cavity ovens with no hob rings are fine on a mains plug * Exceptions do exist, check the ratings plate for power consumption if in doubt.
Gas cookers that need an electricity supply can always go on a manins plug, and consume very little electricity. Dual fuel cookers may need more power than a plug can supply, check the ratings plate.
==Cleaning== The big issues are grease and burnt grease. Bulk grease can be removed with crumpled newspaper first.
Parts that can be removed can be dishwashed, or if no dishwasher is available, cleaned as hot as possible. Dishwashing eliminates grease and can remove a fair amount of burnt on grease as well.
Oven parts that can't be removed are best cleaned with caustic soda solution. This needs heat for full effect. Its a good way to destroy grease, but isn't one of the safest chemicals to handle.
Glass in oven doors can be scraped to remove a lot of muck, but avoid a steel scraper that will scratch the glass. Copper scourers work.
Don't forget to clean the glass lamp cover occasionally, or muck blocks most of the light out.
Its possible to use paint stripper on removed unpainted parts such as wire shelves and glass light covers to refurb them. It removes burnt grease, but the toxicity and expense doesn't justify it for regular use.
===Catalytic linings=== These are a self clean option for some models. Cleaning chemicals should not be used on them, they're cleaned by heating the oven. Some require dry heating the oven to maximum, some require heating with a tray of water in the oven.
==Repair== Many parts are fairly straightforward to replace if fried * Elements * Fan motors * Switches * Wires with crimped conectors
Usually pattern parts from 3rd party manufacturers are available. Many parts for one oven fit other makes and models.
Thermostats can also be replaced, but aren't as easy.
==Light bulbs== Light bulbs designed for oven use are rated for high temperature, and have hardened glass shells to reduce risk of breakage, and possible consequent contamination of food with glass. Its possible to use ordinary appliance lamps instead, but they tend not to last as long, they're cheaper and they're not toughened glass. These are usable where the cooker has a glass cover over the lamp, but not safe to use without the cover.
CFLs aren't an option for oven use.
==Energy efficiency== * If you're concerned about energy use, filling the oven with food uses about the same energy to cook a lot more food in one go. * Very old ovens have no insulation * Some foods only need a minority of the ingredients cooking, the rest can be added without any further cooking. * Microwaving is much more energy efficient with most foods * All canned foods are already cooked. * Electric slow cookers use less energy, and are good for some meal types.
==Oven types== ===Convection oven=== The traditional oven, heat is conducted around the cooking cavity by convection. The result is a lot of temperature variation within the oven.
===Fan oven=== These produce a more or less even temperature distribution all round the oven. They give the same cooking result with a slight reduction in temperature, due to better heat transfer between air and food. The fan motor creates noise.
Fan ovens are sometimes erroneously described as convection ovens.
===Small cookers=== Small all in one cookers such as Baby Bellings are fairly popular in one bed accomodation. They're small, portable, many run on a mains plug, and cook satisfactorily, as long as you don't need a full size oven.
Small cookers come in 2 types, one that runs off a 13A plug, one that needs wiring in to a 30/32A supply.
===Plug-in cookers=== Cookers, which include oven and rings in one appliance, are available that will run off a 13A plug. Small cookers and mini countertop cookers often come in this format.
The total power consumption for the oven plus 2 rings is normally over the 13A limit, so the power delivery is interlocked to prevent all elements being on at once. There are 2 ways this is done: # Some cookers switch one ring off entirely when the oven's on. # Some block power to the interlocked ring only when the oven element is on, so with the oven off this ring works normally, but with the oven on it switches on and off as the oven element goes on and off, giving less heat.
===Mini oven=== Small plug-in desktop ovens were somewhat popular in the 90s. Many of these have very poor performance.
===Combination oven=== These can microwave as well as convection or fan cook. All but the earliest ones can do both at the same time, giving faster cooking with less energy use, and the dry browned finish of traditional cooking.
===Non-thermostatic ovens=== Very few of these are in use, but they have been spotted. Very old pre- thermostatic ovens have a few power settings, and are designed to maintain cooking temperature on the lowest power setting. Higher power settings are only for quick warm up. Cooking on medium tends to produce charcoal. If you must use one of these things, an oven thermometer can tell you what's going on; knowing what temp it cooks at on low makes all the difference to usability.
===Range=== Usability depends on oven temperature, which depends on fuel type and technology. Many of these cook very well, but there are also solid fuel ranges with no thermostat, and some historic ranges produce poor oven temperatures.
The always on aspect of ranges is much appreciated by some, eliminating warm-up times. The downside is substantial extra fuel consumption.
Early solid fuel ranges sometimes take a fair time for the oven to heat up to cooking temperature.
===Miser oven=== Miser oriented ovens such as the [[http:// www.hoorayforhomecooking.co.uk/ Remoska]] have low power ratings, but still attain high temperature. Small size and lack of controllability are issues, but they're fine for some dishes.
===Hot dog oven=== Electrode cookers pass mains electricity directly through the food using metal contacts. In the UK these are known as hot dog cookers, and regarded as a novelty. Many of these cookers are now quite old, and safety is often inadequate. * some lack adequate guarding * some lack adequate interlocking * some lack a timer, and overcooking can cause a fire.
Hot dog sausages are officially rated at 120v, so in Britain its necessary to cook 2 in series or use a current limiting ballast. Power consumption is determined by the sausages, and this should be stamped on the ratings plate on the sausages. Unrated sausages are known to exist though.
LEDs are occasionally inserted into the sausage to indicate when its cooked.
Stainless steel should not be used to replace electrodes, as it deposits ions and corrosion products in the food that aren't safe to eat.
===Gas=== Gas ovens are convection ovens.
Gas is much cheaper per kWh than electricity, but a gas oven necessarily uses more energy due to the need for ventilation.
Some very old gas ovens have no flame failure device. If the flame goes out, gas enters the room unchecked.
Gas ovens and cookers require different jets if run on bottled gas rather than natural gas.
==Preheating== Ovens are mostly preheated before food is put in to cook. Doing this is optional, with virtually all foods cooking fine in an oven not preheated. The time the food's in is longer, but its ready very slightly sooner than preheating.
==Ring / hob types== ===Spiral=== * Quick heat up, good temperature controllability * Muck builds up under the spiral and can catch fire * Line the space underneath with ali foil, then it can be cleaned by replacing the foil * The oldest ring type still in use
===Metal Plate=== * Safer than spiral * Slow to heat and not very good temperature control
===Non-thermostatic plate=== Sometimes non-thermostatic plate rings are found on low end cookers. These have several selectable power levels instead of a continually variable themostat. The result is poorer heat control.
===Ceramic=== * Flat flush surface * Relatively easy to clean * Food burnt onto the surface sticks, everything else wipes off with cream cleaner
===Halogen=== * Dark bottomed pans required to absorb the heat * Easier to clean than ceramic * Halogen radiators need replacement eventually
===Induction=== * Only work with some metal pan types * Easier to clean than ceramic
===Live element rings=== These historic rings are rarely seen, but are still very occasionally found. If you're looking for minimum cost cooking equipment, beware.
These are normally a single plug-in ring with an unusual type of heating element. Instead of the element being a metal block or a spiral, its a ceramic tray with grooves in, and in these grooves sits a spiral of bare live heating wire. Any spillage of cooking water onto the element can make the cooking pan live, resulting electric shock. The shock can cause a boiling water spill, adding burn injury. It also creates a conductive path from heating element to case, which usually doesn't make anything live, but can in some cases.
These are still used in some countries for cost reasons.
===Gas=== There's only one type of gas ring, an open flame. Controllability is generally excellent, though some hobs have controls that make low heat setting difficult.
An issue with gas rings is the tendency for food to boil over and extinguish the gas. This can be a serious safety issue if cooking is left unattended. Gas rings with flame failure devices are now required for locations such as high rise flats.
==Safety testing== Gas appliances in let properties must be safety tested annually. This sometimes produces a cost overhead to gas cooking.
==Culinary issues== The culinary merits of different oven types, preheat versus not and so on are outside of DIY territory, and not addressed here, except where there's a clear issue with the appliance.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26 Nov, 23:08, NT wrote:

Wouldn't British standard sausages be rated at 230V?

Is this correct:
This is now a legal requirement that came into force on the 1st January 2008 and is applicable If you live in a multi occupancy property, e.g. flat, maisonette or student accommodation. Any new gas hob you install after this date must now have an FFD. This term is sometimes referred to as a Flame Supervision Device (FSD)

as above
Owain
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In message

Surely it should mention when it is specifically talking about electic or gas cookers?

The bit that gets dirtiest in ours (it has catalytic linings) in the base. One of those oven liners works a treat (a heavy duty version of those Teflon baking sheet liners). Lift out , in the sink and cleans easily
--
Chris French


Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One more draft, fair bit of new material...
Cooker
==Supply circuit== Whether an electric oven can go on a mains plug or needs it own high current circuit depends on its power consumption. Any oven upto 3kW can go on a 13A mains plug.
Generally speaking, * all in one cookers with oven & hob need their own high current supply * many single cavity ovens with no hob rings are fine on a mains plug, but some aren't * Check the ratings plate for power consumption to be sure.
Gas cookers that need an electricity supply can always go on a manins plug, and consume very little electricity. Dual fuel cookers may need more power than a plug can supply, check the ratings plate.
==Cleaning== The big issues are grease and burnt grease. Bulk grease can be removed with crumpled newspaper first.
Parts that can be removed can be dishwashed, or if no dishwasher is available, cleaned as hot as possible. Dishwashing eliminates grease and can remove a fair amount of burnt on grease as well.
Oven parts that can't be removed are best cleaned with caustic soda solution. This needs heat for full effect. Its a good way to destroy grease, but isn't one of the safest chemicals to handle.
Glass in oven doors can be scraped to remove a lot of muck, but avoid a steel scraper that will scratch the glass. Copper scourers work.
Don't forget to clean the glass lamp cover occasionally, or muck blocks most of the light out.
Its possible to use paint stripper on removed unpainted parts such as wire shelves and glass light covers to refurb them. It removes burnt grease, but the toxicity and expense don't justify it for regular use.
A good way to clean microwave ovens is to boil a cup of water in them for a few minutes. The steaming softens most muck, making it much easier to clean.
An easy way to clean the bottom of the oven is to put ali foil, baking paper or an oven liner sheet on the base. When it gets mucky its just removed. Non-stick oven liner sheets are easily cleaned and reused.
===Catalytic linings=== These are a self clean option for some models. Cleaning chemicals should not be used on them, they're cleaned by heating the oven. Some require dry heating the oven to maximum, some require heating with a tray of water in the oven.
==Repair== Many parts are fairly straightforward to replace if fried * Elements * Fan motors * Switches * Wires with crimped conectors
Usually pattern parts from 3rd party manufacturers are available. Many parts for one oven fit other makes and models.
Thermostats can also be replaced, but aren't as easy.
==Light bulbs== Light bulbs designed for oven use are rated for high temperature, and have hardened glass shells to reduce risk of breakage, and possible consequent contamination of food with glass. Its possible to use ordinary appliance lamps instead, but they tend not to last as long, they're cheaper and they're not toughened glass. These are usable where the cooker has a glass cover over the lamp, but not safe to use without the cover.
CFLs and LEDs aren't an option for oven use.
==Energy efficiency== * If you're concerned about energy use, filling the oven with food uses about the same energy to cook a lot more food in one go. * Very old ovens have no insulation * Some foods only need a minority of the ingredients cooking, the rest can be added without any further cooking. * Microwaving is much more energy efficient with most foods * All canned foods are already cooked. * Electric slow cookers use less energy, and are good for some meal types.
==Oven types== ===Convection oven=== The traditional oven, heat is conducted around the cooking cavity by convection. The result is a lot of temperature variation within the oven.
===Fan oven=== These produce a more or less even temperature distribution all round the oven. They give the same cooking result with a slight reduction in temperature, due to better heat transfer between air and food. The fan motor creates noise.
Fan ovens are sometimes erroneously described as convection ovens.
===Small cookers=== Small all in one cookers such as Baby Bellings are fairly popular in one bed accomodation. They're small, portable, many run on a mains plug, and cook satisfactorily, as long as you don't need a full size oven.
Small cookers come in 2 types, one that runs off a 13A plug, one that needs wiring in to a 30/32A supply.
===Plug-in cookers=== Some types of cooker, which include oven and rings in one appliance, are available that will run off a 13A plug. Small cookers and mini countertop cookers often come in this format.
The total power consumption for the oven plus 2 rings is normally over the 13A limit, so the power delivery is interlocked to prevent all elements being on at once. There are 2 ways this is done: # Some cookers switch one ring off entirely when the oven's on. # Some block power to the interlocked ring only when the oven element is on, so with the oven off this ring works normally, but with the oven on it switches on and off as the oven element goes on and off, giving less heat.
===Mini oven=== Small plug-in desktop ovens were somewhat popular in the 90s. Many of these have very poor performance.
===Combination oven=== These can microwave as well as convection or fan cook. All but the earliest ones can do both at the same time, giving faster cooking with less energy use, and the dry browned finish of traditional cooking.
===Non-thermostatic ovens=== Very few of these are in use, but they have been spotted. Very old pre- thermostatic ovens have a few power settings, and are designed to maintain cooking temperature on the lowest power setting. Higher power settings are only for quick warm up. Cooking on medium tends to produce charcoal. If you must use one of these things, an oven thermometer can tell you what's going on; knowing what temp it cooks at on low makes all the difference to usability.
===Range=== Usability depends on oven temperature, which depends on fuel type and technology. Many of these cook very well, but there are also solid fuel ranges with no thermostat, and some historic ranges produce poor oven temperatures.
The always on aspect of ranges is much appreciated by some, eliminating warm-up times. The downside is substantial extra fuel consumption.
Early solid fuel ranges sometimes take a fair time for the oven to heat up to cooking temperature.
===Miser oven=== Miser oriented ovens such as the [[http:// www.hoorayforhomecooking.co.uk/ Remoska]] have low power ratings, but still attain a healthy cooking temperature. Small size and lack of controllability are issues, but they're fine for some dishes.
===Hot dog oven=== Electrode cookers pass mains electricity directly through the food using metal contacts. In the UK these are known as hot dog cookers, and regarded as a novelty. Many of these cookers are now quite old, and safety is often inadequate. * some lack adequate guarding * some lack adequate interlocking * some lack a timer, and overcooking can cause a fire.
Hot dog sausages are officially rated at 120v, so in Britain its necessary to cook 2 in series or use a current limiting ballast. Power consumption is determined by the sausages, and this should be stamped on the ratings plate on the sausage. Non-BS unrated sausages are known to exist though.
LEDs are occasionally inserted into the sausage to indicate when its cooked.
Stainless steel should not be used to replace electrodes, as it deposits ions and corrosion products in the food that aren't safe to eat. Carbon steel deposits iron in the food ends.
These cookers are a lot more energy efficient than traditional cooking, and possibly the most energy efficient way to cook a sausage. They're also fast.
===Gas=== Gas ovens are convection ovens.
Gas is much cheaper per kWh than electricity, but a gas oven necessarily uses more energy due to the need for ventilation.
Some very old gas ovens have no flame failure device. If the flame goes out, gas enters the room unchecked.
Gas ovens and cookers require different jets if run on bottled gas instead of natural gas.
==Preheating== Ovens are mostly preheated before food is put in to cook. Doing this is optional, with virtually all foods cooking fine in an oven not preheated. The time the food's in is longer, but its ready very slightly sooner than preheating.
==Ring / hob types== ===Spiral element=== * Quick heat up, good temperature controllability * Muck builds up under the spiral and can catch fire * Line the space underneath with ali foil, then it can be cleaned by replacing the foil * The oldest electric ring type still in use
===Metal Plate=== * Safer than spiral * Slow to heat and not very good temperature control
===Non-thermostatic plate=== Sometimes non-thermostatic plate rings are found on low end cookers. These have several selectable power levels instead of a continually variable themostat. The result is poorer heat control.
===Ceramic=== * Flat flush surface * Relatively easy to clean * Food burnt onto the surface sticks, everything else wipes off with cream cleaner
===Halogen=== * Dark bottomed pans required to absorb the heat * Easier to clean than ceramic * Halogen radiators need replacement eventually
===Induction=== * Only work with some metal pan types * Easier to clean than ceramic
===Live element rings=== These historic rings are rarely seen, but are still very occasionally found. If you're looking for minimum cost cooking equipment, beware.
These are normally a single plug-in ring with an unusual type of heating element. Instead of the element being a metal block or a spiral, its a ceramic tray with grooves in, and in these grooves sits a spiral of bare live heating wire. Any spillage of cooking water onto the element can make the cooking pan live, resulting electric shock. The shock can cause a boiling water spill, adding burn injury. It also creates a conductive path from heating element to case, which usually doesn't make anything live, but can in some cases.
These are still used in some countries for cost reasons.
===Gas=== There's only one type of gas ring, an open flame. Controllability is generally excellent, though some hobs have controls that make low heat setting difficult.
An issue with gas rings is the tendency for food to boil over and extinguish the gas. This can be a serious safety issue if cooking is left unattended.
Any new gas hob installed from Jan 1st 2008 onward in a multi occupancy property must now have a flame failure device, known as an FFD or FSD (Flame Supervision Device)
I struggle to believe its necessary to say don't leave the gas on unlit, it rapidly forms an explosive mixture with air, but yes, I've seen it done.
==Safety testing== Gas appliances in let properties must be safety tested annually. This sometimes produces a cost overhead to gas cooking. Its not a requirement for existing equipment to meet the regulations that apply to new installs.
==Culinary issues== The culinary merits of different oven types, preheat versus not and so on are outside of DIY territory, and not addressed here, except where there's a clear issue with the appliance.
==Fires== Cooking rings are one of the leading causes of the 69,000 fires per year in Britain. * Cooking left unattended has a high risk of catching fire * Frying also has risks. Once fat or oil starts smoking its close to self ignition.
Oven cooking is safer, as the item is contained inside a metal box.
New ovens are designed to remain safe if the thermostat fails on. Ovens a couple of decades old may not though, and can eventually catch fire if the stat fails.
Microwaves cause fires if food is grossly overcooked. This happens much more quickly than with heat ovens. If food catches fire, stop the cooking but leave the door shut, and the food is likely to self extinguish.
Never put water on a frying fat fire. The result is a mild explosion. * Water fire extinguishers cause explosive spread of fire * Wet foam extinguishers cause explosive spread of fire * CO2 fire extinguishers blow the burning food around * Dry foam extinguishers are suitable
A fire blanket is the standard way to deal with hob food fires. A wet towel is often used when there's no fire blanket. Its not ideal but usually works - it can end up catching fire though.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 18:46:49 -0800 (PST) Nt wrote :

Is it April 1 back in the UK ?
--
Tony Bryer, Greentram: 'Software to build on' Melbourne, Australia
www.superbeam.co.uk www.superbeam.com www.greentram.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sometimes referred to as T300 (for 300C working).

The outer glass bulb is still soda lime just like any light bulb. It's not hardened, and oven lamps require an additional glass cover to protect food splashes from shattering the glass. Difference is that a high temperature glue is used to bond the lamp base to the glass. (May also use a higher temperature solder, I don't know about that.) If you use a regular (non-oven) lamp in an oven, the glass will often detach from the base when you try to take out a dead lamp after it's spent periods at oven temperatures, for which the glue wasn't designed.

Sorry, but anyone who cooks in an oven knows that's not true. Anyone who doesn't know this and follows your advice may end up with under-cooked food, and all the nasties that come with that. Please don't make up things you don't know about.
[didn't bother reading any further]
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It covers whether you can put it on a plug or not, a common question here. It covers cleaning, energy efficiency, repair, which bulbs to use, gas safety requirements, and fire risks, all of which are uk.d-i- y wiki categories unless I'm mistaken.
NT
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In message

Yebbut
most of it belongs in the ladybird book of cooking appliances
uk.diy is not about how to differentiate between the different types of ovens, whether parts can be dishwashed etc
"Don't forget to clean the glass lamp cover occasionally, or muck blocks most of the light out. " - well, no shit sherlock
Why not condense it down to about the 20 lines you would need to say it all ?
--
geoff

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.