What type of ladder to get to paint the landing?

Hi,
I am going to paint my landing and I need to reach the space above the stairs. I want to get a ladder but ideally have one that is good for general use in the future as well. As there are so many different types of ladder, which type should I go for?
Thanx
AMO
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AMO wrote:

Bought a set of these some time ago out of Aldi.
Three in one converts to the 'A' frame,straight and as you can see platform.
The platform is a great way to position it on the stairs,one side goes up a couple of flights,other side goes down a couple. Makes wallpapering,painting,plastering a doddle.
http://tinyurl.com/yfkd7o
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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Thanx Benjamin. The stairs in my house go round in a circular direction - as you travel up the stairs, by the time you get to the top you are facing in the opposite direction. Is this ladder still suitable?
Thanx.
AMO
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AMO wrote:

Sounds like a perfect app for a homemade ladder. The good thing about a multisection wood ladder is you can put it together anyway you want at any time, using heavy steel brackets to join the parts. Pilot hole and screw, and in a few minutes you've got whatever shape you need. Its also easy nuff to make restrainers that sit on the steps and prevent any ladder movement, and sidebars that prevent any chance of tipover, no matter how far out you reach. If you have the basic cability to design a wood ladder, this really is the safest option. OTOH for people that dont understand redundancy and splitting, better to leave making ladders alone.
36x63 CLS is good wood for making a heavy ladder. Reject all cracked wood. The square shape makes jointing sections easy. Minimum of 2 screws for every joint, pilot holed to prevent splitting and fixing to nearly full depth of wood. Add rubber feet, a wide top standoff, small high load rated brackets for joining, and in stairwell use 2 full stair width rails to prevent side movement, secure the feet, and you've got a rigid working platform far safer than any ali ladder. Ply is better for working platforms than chip or plank, but planks are widely used.
NT
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"AMO" wrote:

If you have access to a digital camera you could upload a couple of photos of your stairs to a site such as http://www.imagehost.ro/ so that we have some idea of the space restrictions. Whether you can use the ladder for general use in the future depends on the type of ladder that will fit on your stairs. A 3-way ladder such as http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId 0232&ts†199&idf861 or combination ladder such as http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId 0232&ts…641&id271 can be used on stairs and in lots of general situations but I can't say whether they will fit on your stairs or reach far enough to the highest point of the ceiling. Other options to consider are hiring access equipment from a tool hire centre, and you can apply emulsion using a paint roller on a telescopic handle. In some situations the only solution is to build a wooden platform on which you can stand a step ladder.
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Codswallop wrote:

AND THEN:

Eliciting a convoluted attempt to help an idiot:

No matter how much help you give someone online, there is a fatal flaw in human psychology in that the explanation of the problem is not necessarily coming from someone who is capable of describing it correctly.

Or to put it another way: How the hell are we supposed to know what an idiot won't tell you?
It's bad enough in real life trying to second guess what an idiot does tell you. Consider the shenanigans going on in politics today with a chimp running the USA and a sock puppet running this one.
And now an attempt at a "one size fits all" solution:
You can make a ladder out of 2 x 2 PAR if the grain is straight and clear of knots. If not, use 3 x 2 for the sides and knot free 2 x 2 for the rungs.
Treat the timber with an oil based preservative if it is to be used again and store in a dry area, off the ground. Any cuts made must be double painted with preservative as the end grain will absorb more.
If the ladder is to be kept indefinitely it might be an idea to let the rungs into the sides of the ladder. One third of the depth of the section to be let is plenty. 2 x 2 is actually 44 x 44 mm so cut the steps 15 mm or so into the sides.
So long as the ladder is balanced in use, it does not matter if one side is longer than the other. This allows you to make one with a side tthat sits on a step lower than the other.
Furthermore: If the matter of comfort is a requirement, the rungs aught to be set in at an angle permitting the foot to rest on a flat surface. Either that or shave the rung(s) that will be stood on longest to suit.
Once the preservative has dried, the rungs can be glued and screwed. Pre drill the screw holes to prevent splitting. (and of course treat the open holes before assembly.)
I doubt very much that anyone would go to the bother of making one of these things to save 20 or 30 quid. It is set out here merely as a lesson in DIYing. (And replying to the sort of person that comes here occasionally.)
If you have any problems with my style, please feel free to put my posts in your filter. I am far too good to be read by fools.
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Can I just confirm that it is AMO that you are calling an idiot? I have no problems with your style, it was quite a good read to me.
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Codswallop wrote:

WTF are you?
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Weatherlawyer, there are always people like you on every group. Those that are idiots or overly proud are those that charge forward doing the job without any research whatsoever. My posts were fine. There was no way I could have posted them any other way as I needed to see the images of the recommended ladders to then further query whether they'd be suitable for my staircase as I am unfamiliar with such types of ladder.
AMO
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AMO wrote:

Take no notice to him amo,he likes to hear himself now and again.
Pics would be a good bet as what you were describing needs to be seen.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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Thanx Benjamin and to all else who replied. Sorry, I lent my cousins my digital camera to my cousin and so am unable to take a picture.
Thanx for the advice.
AMO
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AMO wrote:

Arrrgh! sacrilage,never lender nor a borrower.
/me cringes at the very thought of lending something out.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

So who has your brains then?
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I wouldn't put my life on the line using one of YOUR ladders, thank you very much. Glueing the rungs to the stringers would be pointless as the bond would very quickly break owing to the dynamic loading and stressing of the timber. And I certainly wouldn't trust the tensile strength of screwing into endgrain!! (Please note I have been boning up on my basic physics this morning).
Proper timber ladders have round-section rungs with tapered ends, which are tightly wedged into recesses in the stringers, not glued. The ladder is held together by thick galvanised wire ties with washers each end, spaced every six rungs or so, which stop the stringers coming off the ends of the rungs. Even my old wooden step-ladder has these ties. The rungs are usually hardwood, e.g. Ramin.
And why bother with liquid preservative (which would make your glue bond even weaker) when you can simply use pre-treated timber from the merchants?
Peter
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Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


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Peter Taylor wrote:

There is no necessity to copy the rounded design of commercial wood ladders. Nor to use hardwood - but deviating from best design does mean more wood and more weight to stay safe. 2x2 is marginal but should be passable if not overweight. What concerns me about talk of homemade ladders is its too easy to miss something and end up with a dangerous contraption. For example there wasnt much detail on rung fixing, and this is a critical issue. Fix it wrong and you're looking at a serous accident. If and only if someone understands the engineering principles, ie redundancy, what size of wood is carrying what load (and no it isnt 2x2 on a 2x2 ladder, or even close), what wood size is needed, and understands fixings properly, then they can be safer than any shop bought ladder will ever be. Trouble is, if you dont know what size screws to use, dont pilot hole them, or dont put the right number in the right place, it can go very wrong.
Maybe we need a piece on wood ladders and how to ensure theyre safe, or at least as safe as a ladder can realistically be.
NT
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AMO wrote:

I've just done my stairs which have a circular section in the middle and I used a regular alumunium ladder but I have a very long reach so don't have to go up all that high.
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of
Alloy double or treble extension. They can be split or extended to suit any height and are a easier to handle
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