Wall fixings

I have a number of external shutters on my house which are hung on heavy 4" lift-off butt hinges. My guess is that they were installed in the early part of the 20th century.
The fixed leaves of the hinges are recessed into the outboard edges of the reveals which are of softish (Chilmark) stone. Individual, roughly square, holes for each fixing screw have been chiselled out about 3/8 to 1/2" across flats and up to 2" deep (somebody must have had a lot of patience!): these have been plugged with wood into which #10 or #12 woodscrews up to 1 1/2" long have been screwed for fixing the hinges.
A lot of the plugs no longer hold screws and there are some cracks in the stone between holes so I don't want to use anything that expands and is likely to brake the face stone away - it's happened on one already and somebody has replaced it with an ugly backflap fixed to the face of the wall, further up than the original hinge.
One thought is to plug the holes with Plastic Padding Liquid Chemical, spot through the hinges for the hole centres and then drill and tap M6 and use countersunk M6 screws instead of woodscrews.
I think that that should work but there must be other and possibly better or easier ways of doing it.
Any suggestions?
Bob
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If there is the depth drill and plug the base of the existing hole and use long screws.
--
Roger Chapman

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Roger wrote:

There's stacks of depth but the holes will still be parallel to the face of the stone and can still be as little as 5/8" from it so there is still the risk of the expansion of the rawlplug cracking the stone.
Bob
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In article < snipped-for-privacy@m79g2000cwm.googlegroups.co

Although the holes are a little large it sounds like a classic job for a chemical anchor, instead of tapping for a screw consider using a stainless stud in each hole & finish with a dome headed nut. Or does it need to be a flush fixing?
You might need to be a bit cagey with the application, perhaps applying gaffer tape over each hole, pierced in the middle to take the epoxy nozzle and to hold the stud in place while the epoxy goes off. The trick is to fit the wall side part of the hinge before the epoxy goes fully off to get the studs properly aligned.
Screwfix do the bits: http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp ;?cId0071 , studs could be cut down to size of course. Domed nuts here: http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?&idY923
HTH
--
fred
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Thanks for the suggestion but, yes, a flush fixing is needed as it is replacing a countersunk woodscew.
I've done a trial run with tapped Plastic Padding on an odd piece of similar stone and it holds a treat. Unfortunately the rapid setting of the PP precludes mixing up enough for more than two holes at a time.
Bob
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In article < snipped-for-privacy@b28g2000cwb.googlegroups.com

You could set some threaded spacers in epoxy but I reckon that setting a good quality plastic wallplug in same will do the job very effectively. Using a screw with a deep cut thread will limit the expansion of the plug and the strength of the epoxy will take care of the rest. I think you'll find application by the injection system to be a relief in its simplicity. I can recommend fischer fixings from screwfix or others with a bit more meat to suit this job better. eg: http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp ;?idD940 , easy on the resin should stop the plug filling through the slots, clear the plug out with an undersize drill if unlucky.
--
fred
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