vertical outlet back-to-wall S trap toilet

Can you (still) get a vertical outlet back-to-wall S trap toilet. I will be putting a new small toilet room into the corner of the kitchen, with the cistern the other side of the wall under the stairs. The loo needs to be back to the wall, with the outlet discharging downwards into a new soil pipe what will be layed in the floor. Can't find such on the web. Maybe I don't have the right keywords. Cheers, Simon.
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You need a standard back-to-the-wall toilet and concealed cistern. These have a horizontal outlet which is far enough forward to use a 90 degree pan connector (or a swan neck if space is tight).
I usually fit the Roca Laura version, or the Roca Senso Compact if space is really tight.
A
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You should be able to use a rear outlet one quite easily.
I've recently remodeled a cloakroom which has a soil pipe in the floor. I went for a wall mounted pan and used a Grohe frame to mount it. The package comes with a right angled soil pipe adaptor. There is an option for a canted version of the adaptor which effectively allows the soil pipe to be immediately behind the panel rather than about 30mm back. Geberit is another manufacturer of these.
For a back to wall pan, you don't need the frame, but the principle is the same.
There are plenty of suppliers on the web. Boundary Bathrooms has a fairly well laid out site with quite a wide choice.
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said:

Tried the Grohe web site, no pictures or mention of these frames. Got a bit closer with Geberit, who have a tiny thumbnail of some frames but clicking the download 'technical information' link on the Wall Hung Systems page, not unexpectedly returns a 404 error.
Roger R
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They hide their products well - obviously don't want *everyone* buying them,,, :-)
http://www.grohe.co.uk/t/25_848.html
http://www.geberit.co.uk/geberit/inet/uk/wcmsuk.nsf/pages/prod-san-Wall-duo-1
I used the Grohe one because the web site had much better detail of how maintenance is done. Probably the Geberit one is similar.
At any rate, you can get the Grohe cistern separately if you are happy with a back to wall pan on the floor. The frame is to support wall mount pans. My suggestion to look at this was based on having to deal with soil connection in the floor with the wall directly in front of the frame. If you have control over where the soil pipe is positioned in the floor, then you have no problem.
For the Grohe cistern, all maintenance can be done through a small panel in the top or front. This is normally where a flush panel is fitted. To maintain, remove flush panel. You can access the cistern and remove the siphon and float valve for maintenance - all spares available of course.
I went for a different arrangement because I didn't want to have a flush panel - would have spoiled the appearance of the installation - so instead used a dual push button with pneumatic tubes to the flush mechanism. The cistern itself is in an enclosure with a removable granite top.
If you have access to the cistern easily, then maintenance may not be a problem, but it is something else to take into consideration.
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Thanks for those links - more than I could find.

My situation is to replace a former close coupled Twyford S type pan. http://www.bluestar.65704.btinternet.co.uk / The difficulty is getting a new soil pipe outlet (with adpator) to line up with the soil pipe emerging from the flooring.
I would like to go for a wall mounted pan, but am concerned that there will not be sufficient clearence behind the pan to get the outlet to line up with the soil pipe.
The close coupled (cheapo) P type pans fitted with S adaptor that I have seen so far, require the soil pipe to be much closer to the wall than can be easily accomodated because the soil pipe comes along between rafters parallel to the wall. This would mean setting the cistern forward from the wall on some kind of boxed in frame. Not IMO the most desirable solution.
Possibly the wall mounted pans you mentioned may offer a solution.
Roger R
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Another option if you are going to create a box is to buy just an enclosed cistern. The two vendors above make these as well and there are other sources. You could fit the cistern onto the wall or on the back of the panel and go for your original idea of a back to wall pan.
Rather than lose the res of the space, you could perhaps think about making a small cupboard alongside the cistern.
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Personally I have never felt too confident in sitting on a china item fastened to a wall that may already have been wreakened with a hole for a soil pipe.
Any tales of problems?
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This is why one uses a proper steel frame behind a wall panel and the pan is attached to that. The frame is attached to the structure of the wall panel (e.g. studs or steel framing) or to masonry behind.
Considering the mechanics, most of the weight is transfered to the floor
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