Solar Roof Panels

    Just a thought - as the panels have a lot of metalwork and are presumably at earth potential what are the added lightning risks?. Will they "attract" lightning? If so, then should they have a heavy earth cable into a ground rod?
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On 30/07/2013 19:43, DerbyBorn wrote:

Negligible compared to your TV aerial if you still have one!
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Mmmm! But is an aerial as "earthy"? Also, is the co-ax so light that it would vapourise without conducting too much current??
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On Tue, 30 Jul 2013 20:20:09 GMT, DerbyBorn

We don't really do grounding of TV aerials in this country like they do in other jurisdictions, eg USA.
Clearly the laws of physics are different abroad.
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Actually have a look at the mitigation measures taken in Cape Canaveral for deflecting lightening there. T they seem to just use soem avarage looking towers or posts with wires strung between them, and yet things still get hit. No I think its a lot more to do with the conductivity of the air in between one point and another and that is very random and overwhelms the small differences in the size or earthyness of aerials and arrays. I had the highest aerial in the area for many many years and was never struck once, but other houses down the hill from me were so its rather like a lottery, I never won those either. Brian
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On Wednesday, July 31, 2013 9:58:29 AM UTC+1, Brian Gaff wrote:

for

Also the ionization of the air (leading to the conducting path and therefor e the lightening) depends on the local field gradient. That is strongest n ear pointy conductors, where the field lines converge, and that's why light ening conductors often have spikes on top.
Robert
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'Tho Furse do a dished one that seems to contradict that idea...
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On 30/07/2013 21:20, DerbyBorn wrote:

On previous house .. mine didn't vapourise instantly, it took a lot of energy, blew the telly and burnt a large slot through the cast iron guttering .... it had been simply run down roof tiles, & over guttering by previous owner.
I slept through it, only found out in morning when a large part of telly was the other side of the room.
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Hardly any more then what they already are. Your average lightning discharge has usually travelled a few miles, runs at millions of volts and at tens of kilo-amps so a bit of wire on the roof?..
What usually happens is it will take whatever route or routes it can find to get to ground wherever they are. TV aerials usually get vaporised particularly the aerial cable. Bricks can be blown out of walls, light and power circuits can be very seriously damaged and so on;(..
What a decent lightning conductor does is to SHUNT the lightning currents past the house to Earth thus giving it a very direct path to Earth.
Normally done with a Copper or Ally earthing "tape" some 1 inch by eighth and a few deep driven electrodes info the ground. This needs to be a lot more substantial then the usual rod for earthing purposes. The lightning conductor needs to be of as low impedance as possible even a kinked bend around a gutter can present a point where the current can arc over!..
After that grim diatribe you might like to read a section on the Furse website that outlines the protection of PV systems!.. http://europe.tnb.com/pub/en/node/2460
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On Wed, 31 Jul 2013 00:58:42 +0100, tony sayer wrote:

After that post, I wonder if you-know-who (as in my sig) will be back...
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On 31 Jul 2013 00:07:53 GMT, Bob Eager wrote:

I doubt it Bob - I heard he'd been struck by lightning.
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Peter.
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*Applause*
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Today is Boomtime, the 66th day of Confusion in the YOLD 3179
RIP John Weldon Cale (December 5, 1938 – July 26, 2013), aka JJ Cale
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Does anyone know what happened to him or where he went?. Prolly storm 'chasin out in Texas somewhere;?..
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wrote:

Many years ago I read that the primary purpose of a lightning conductor was to _prevent_ lightning strikes, by in effect 'short circuiting' the static charge building up in the cloud layer before it gets high enough to arc to earth. Apparently the current passing in a lightning conductor before a lightning flash can be very high, an indication that this shorting process is happening. If the flash actually occurs, it can be interpreted as the lightning conductor having failed to achieve its intended primary purpose.
Having said that, I find it hard to believe that when lightning conductors were first used, short circuiting the cloud was the original intention. They only discovered that much later. I would think the original intention was as you describe, to carry the current to earth down a path that would cause least damage to the adjacent structure.
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Chris

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Yes this should have been written as prevention of the damage caused by a strike, it doesn't ward them off as such;!..
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On 31/07/2013 00:58, tony sayer wrote:

Lightning conductors do nothing of the sort. If you actually look at them you will see they have a fusible link just in case they get struck. They actually reduce the chances of being struck not prevent the damage if they are.
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The ones at our theatre certainly don't have one and it would have to be yards long to be of any value in stopping a flow of electrons.
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Den!, thats not a bloody fusible link its to isolate it so you can test the earth electrode resistance!...
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Tony Sayer

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Thank f*ck you confirmed that as I couldn't believe what he had written.
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On 01/08/2013 08:49, The Other Mike wrote:

Do you really think the link won't fuse before the conductor does?
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