Sockets on Different Phases ?

When I've wired runs of 240v single phase 13A sockets in various buildings on the farm I've always put them all on one phase so that there is no danger of 415v phase to phase accidents when using things on leads - am I being paranoid ?
I'm currently wiring up a Tractor Shed with runs of 13A sockets on opposite walls 40 foot apart. It would be convenient to put them on different phases not only to balance the load but also to free up a 'way' in the breaker box. But this goes against my natural instinct.
..... what does the team think ?
Andrew
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Well I can well remember many many years ago the factory I was working in got a visit from the Electricity mob, as our new extension running soak tests on colour tvs and with lots of Fluorescent lights was making a hole in one phase. After much measuring and head scratching they did put different parts of our factory on different phases at the Leccy folks expense. I certainly do not recall anyone even mentioning the 440 volt issue, though now you mention it I guess if you were really determined you could achieve it! Brian
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Yep. I have outlets on more than phase on it works fine when you lose just one phase, you don't lose everything.

It'll be fine, and there is no team.
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On 10-Nov-17 8:22 AM, Andrew Mawson wrote:

My factories all had 13A sockets on different phases, as did the headquarters of the Electricity Board I use to work for. The basic rule was to ensure that there was at least 6ft 6in (2m) separation between sockets on different phases. To avoid any doubt, the sockets were marked with red, yellow or blue phase discs, as appropriate, on the wall beside them. I suppose these days, they would be marked brown, black or grey.
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Grey, really? Brian
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On 10/11/2017 14:39, Brian Gaff wrote:

Yes, Grey. A compromise, as the original harmonization suggestion was to have three phase wired using three black cores!
SteveW
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Steve Walker wrote:

Yes, an absolutely mad decision making it impossible to have any illuminated indicators in the phase colours
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how about 1, 2 & 3?
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On 11/11/2017 11:46, charles wrote:

I thought colours ought not to be relied upon anyway - unless users all airline pilots, train drivers or others known not to be colour-blind
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On 11/11/2017 12:31, Robin wrote:

An electrician who is colour blind will presumably know it and use other methods for identification, for the rest following a colour in and out of junction boxes, isolators, etc. is the normal way.
SteveW
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On 11/11/2017 13:49, Steve Walker wrote:

yes but I had in mind not cable but the "illuminated indicators"
In passing I'm not sure how many colour-blind electricians are trained these days. The JIB used to require a medical certificate to show "absence of colour blindness in order to carry out the role to the degree necessary to ensure no impediment to safe working and in accordance with disability discrimination law" which left me not much wiser. Employers are under a duty to assess the risks of any employee who works with colour coded stuff. I don't know about insurance for self-employed sparks.
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On 11/11/2017 14:50, Robin wrote:

Ah, fair enough. But each indicator should be labelled anyway. Coloured indicators for each phase will still appear lit or not to a colour blind person, so noworse for them than them all being white.
Incidentally though, it is normal on many control panels for green and red lights to be used for running and stopped. Many people are red/green colour blind, so they have to look harder at labels.
On screen control systems often have devices or valves that are green for running or open and red for stopped or closed. I wonder how many operators are tested for colour blindness?

From the quick look that I've done. Good colour vision still seems to be required for apprentices, but not for people who work as electricians and may have gained qualifications and experience without being an apprentice.
SteveW
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On 12/11/2017 22:20, Steve Walker wrote:

I was involved in the design of some new control kit in the 2000's and the then mandatory Human Factors assessment lady more or less vetoed any coloured lights.
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On 12/11/2017 22:47, newshound wrote:

She shouldn't have been doing. She should have been requiring other ways that a colour blind person could get the information (such as labelling), but not removing the best and quickest way for non-colour blind operators to get that same information. A red/green indication can be spotted from across the room, labelling and the like can't.
SteveW
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Ah the standard "a few people can't do it so we'll drag everyone else down to that level" approach of H&S, Human Factors, political correctness etc. :-(
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On 13/11/2017 08:54, NY wrote:

Not a few people -- around 1 in 12 men are red-green colour blind. I'm not too severely affected, but I have great difficulty telling whether an LED indicator is red, orange, yellow or green; though I can usually see the change if I'm watching it. Flashing in a particular pattern solves it.
Wiring serial comms 'D' connectors was always a bit of a challenge, too.
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Figure an optician friend quoted for the UK was 1 in 3 males with blue eyes. Something to do with genes. May be different today.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Before I went to university, I worked for a year off in a research chemistry lab where they did a lot of colour chemistry. My boss was telling me about my predecessor who kept getting results that no-one else could replicate. To begin with, the lad was just asked to repeat his experiments and still he was adamant about the colour changes that he saw. My boss decided to watch, to see if the lad was doing something different. Just as they were about to get to the colour-change part of the experiment, the lad said casually "I *am* colour blind - does that matter?". Yes indeed it did matter: what the student was recording as a yellow to green change was actually the expected red to blue change.
As my boss was telling me this story, I thought he was going to say that the lad didn't know he was colour blind and this was how he first discovered it, but no - he already knew full well but didn't realise that it would be critical when doing colour chemistry.
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On Sunday, 12 November 2017 22:20:41 UTC, Steve Walker wrote:

Not necessarily. I recently came across somebody who could not see red at all. It was a sunny day and a glass ornament was casting a clear spectrum on the wall. He pointed to the parts of the spectrum that he could see. Red was simply not visible at all.
John
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One reason for the change from red for 'live' green for 'earth'
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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