Semi with separate gutters, neighbour asking to join gutters

Our 1930's semi currently has separate plastic guttering systems, with each half having their own single downpipe, although our downpipe is cast iron. We've lived there over 10 years, with our elderly neighbour living there far, far longer. Neither gutter have been replaced in that period, but as neither is cast iron, both have been replaced at some point.
Our neighbour approached us to say that she's replacing her guttering. Apparently she also mentioned something about having a damp problem, but I'm not certain where it is, or whether the guttering replacement is meant to resolve this. Apparently there was some discussion about whether we wanted our side replaced as well - we can't afford this.
Today we've been asked to confirm whether we want the guttering systems connected. At present they're separate, and doing a quick check around neighbouring properties, there's a mix of both joined and unjoined. I suspected originally they were joined, but over the years some have been separated as one half replace theirs.
When I said I was happy to leave it as is, she was fairly polite, but pressed the point that (she was advised?) as there would be a gap (however small), that water could run down and cause damp. She repeatedly said that she's fine with our decision, but to make it clear she's warned us of the potential problems. I think she was trying to make it clear that if things go wrong, its our fault.
My reason for not wanting them joined was mainly that it's not been a problem for the last 10 years (and likely longer), and that I'd like to avoid shared systems were possible to prevent potential disputes should one side leak/overflow etc.
What do people recommend? Should we connect our guttering (assuming it's possible) or keep separate? Is there a real chance of damp due to the gap, or is it best to keep as-is?
Thanks
David
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David Hearn wrote:

    The supplier is trying to drum up business. Keep it separate. The risk of a damp wall is minute IMO. Check that your guttering is undamaged before and after next door has the work done.
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Capitol wrote:

If you have corrugated tiles (rather than flat slates) best if the gap is in a valley, rather than a ridge, to minimise runoff.
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Andy Burns wrote:

I'm not expert but intuitively, I would have thought the exact opposite?
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Bob Minchin wrote:

That's what I meant to write!
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On 01/03/14 11:48, David Hearn wrote:

A small gap is irrelevant - think how much rain hits your walls anyway.
And even working gutters catch some rain on the outside that runs down underneath and drips!
I would not connect them if your downpipes are set up to cope with an isolated system.
Then if she (or new occupant) fails to clean her gutters or fix a blocked downpipe, you do not suddenly get the benefit of a lot of extra water or muck down yours.
Never share any service with a neighbour that you don't have to! Ever...
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Tim Watts wrote:

My neighbour and I jointly replaced the soffits/fascias/guttering of our houses about 7 years ago, I organised the materials, they borrowed a scaffold tower and we shared the work.
There's a single run of guttering front and back, in other houses I've known, the front gutter has a downpipe on one house and the rear is on the other, but here both downpipes are on my house.
After we'd finished the work he asked me for copies of the receipts for the materials and he'd square up, when I did so he struck-off his half of the cost for the downpipes and outlets, on the grounds they were all mine, cheeky git! I felt like putting a hacksaw through the gutter at the mid-point and fitting two end-stops.
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On 03/01/2014 12:26 PM, Andy Burns wrote:

Some people are unbelievable. No wonder there are so many disputes.
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On 01/03/14 12:26, Andy Burns wrote:

Exactly...
Keep your dealings with neighbours light and airy...
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A very long story, but, shortened version :-
My parents own a property in a village and 5 houses have septic tanks, the over flows of which combine and run through our property. A few years ago there was a blockage of the common pipe on our land and I organised a company to come in and clear it. It is amazing what passes through the system, including a very large foam sponge. Any way after it was cleared I spoke with the neighbours about sharing the cost and apart from one they said, tough, it's on your land you have to pay the bill, maybe legally correct, morally they were a bunch of self righteous tossers .
I really felt like blocking their feeds into our pipework for a few days, but didn't!!
PS, the effect of the blockage being removed is very impressive with 100' head of "liquid" out of a 4" pipe, you don't want to be anywhere nearby.
--
Bill

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On 03/01/2014 02:47 PM, Bill wrote:

18 of our semis are served by what was a private sewer along the rear of the properties. When that blocked the same argument ensued, with those up the road refusing to contribute. The Council took the problem over, added 10% and split the bill across all the properties. Fortunately now as I understand it, the Water companies have taken them over.
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Andy Cap wrote:

Yes, nicely summarised here
<http://www.water.org.uk/home/policy/private-sewers-transfer/customer-info/before-after
Similarly, the water companies seem set to take over private sewage pumping stations by 2016.
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The normal way here is one has the front pipe and one has the rear.
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On 01/03/2014 12:03, Tim Watts wrote:

+1
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On 01/03/2014 12:03, Tim Watts wrote:

I'd second that. I clear lots of guttering & very often the problem is with next doors.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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Very true. Especially a driveway.

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Depends on the drop and its direction mainly. If it is all going your way, then you will get all their shit and crud as well. Half the problem is that originally as far as I can tell, the highest point was the join so it often mattered little if they were n joined or not. You need to stand out during a cloudburst and watch if the water overflows and where, or go up a ladder and pour some water and see whe re i t goes. Trying to get contractors to look after the levels and drops properly can be a strain on the nerves..
Brian
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On Sat, 01 Mar 2014 11:48:40 +0000, David Hearn

You're very lucky to have separate gutters. I live in a terraced house second from the end, and the water from the one on the end has to travel 4 houses to the nearest downpipe. The gutters drip a bit, and water just sits there, so I reckon the downpipe is blocked.
--
Dave W

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On 01/03/2014 16:18, Dave W wrote:

Same here. A couple of years ago next door had a 4 foot icicle on the underside of their gutter, right above the front door. Could have been a horror show
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ISTR someone here had an icicle like that come through the conservatory roof.
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Andrew Gabriel
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