Screwfix tut

I needed to find a long bolt to take a wing-nut for a piece of equipment as
the tread has stripped.
Knew Screwfix would have one, but received no help whatsoever from the
staff. I was told to look in the catalogue. I knew neither the thread or
whether it would take a wing-nut.
I left and went to local DIY shop (Maxwells)
Heaps of bolts of all sizes in fixtures for me to try.
Bought several for 10p each.
Screw Screwfix
Reply to
Jim S
In message , Jim S wrote
You wanted Screwfix to provide staff for perhaps 15/30 minutes for them to get you samples of all their bolts for you to try at a cost of, say, £2/3 so that you could purchase 20p of bolts?
Reply to
Alan
Nature of the beast. It's a trade outlet.
Like all trade outlets, part of the reason they're cheaper is because they don't tie up staff time on customers making low cost purchases.
Argos is the nearest to a retail business using a trade business model. You don't get to fiddle with goods or get advice on them. Customers don't have the opportunity to mix up or damage stock, tear open boxes or shoplift stuff. Consequently Argos can be more price competitive.
Reply to
dom
Think about all the others in the queue you would keep waiting and annoy. I had to stand in screwfix as some old woman was moaning about a wall light and didn't have enough to pay - or didn't want to pay. She was told to pick an alternative and wasted a lot of time having each product described and shown to her - then left without buying anything. The bolt sizes are in the catalogue AND on their WEBSITE! So you had no excuse for not looking before you went. I hate helpless people that expect everyone else to do everything for them. I will never help anyone like that. Why are so many people completely helpless now anyway? They seem unable to know how to obtain phone numbers, addresses, company details, product details and reviews etc. Most shouldn't be allowed out. I was even asked for directions by some idiot that had a satnav stuck on his front window.
Reply to
Simon
So if the public don't shoplift it can only say one thing about who pinches things from them. I have bought two products from Argos that had been repackaged and sold as new although they were faulty and had previously been returned. If Argos got shut of the "try before you bring it back" policy it would be far better. It attracts a certain "type" of customer who will just take what they can back for refunds.
Reply to
Simon
In article ,
It's a *catalogue* sales operation. They keep costs low by expecting *you* to choose what you want from their catalogue. If you need help with things like this you need to go to a traditional retailer. Where hopefully they will have staff trained to help.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
And the staff in the Reading branch have always gone out of their way to assist me whenever I've had similar questions. In fact it's set up with three tills, a collection point and an info desk next to that. Just go to the info desk and ask away. If it means going and getting several items to check, or for you to look at, that's exactly what they do.
Regards
Mark
Reply to
Mark A
If it didn't work as a business model, they'd go out of business. Clearly it works for them and the lower prices draw sufficient customers, regardless of the downsides.
Reply to
dom
I hope I don't get in a queue behind such a "hunt the bolt" operation.
Such items should be bought from the local DIY shop whilst they still exist - and whilst there - spend a bit of money to keep them in business - they are invaluable. They tend of have stocks of items that are broke up from large packs.
Reply to
John
I really don't see what you're upset about. Screwfix do what they do very well. They don't sell individual bolts, and can't help with the kind of problem you have. Get over it.
Reply to
Grunff
I didn't join the queues at the main tills, but asked a bloke who seemed to be giving information. However since his information seemed to be "I don't care" (at this point he didn't know whether I needed 1 bolt or 1000). Next time when I do need 1000, Screwfix won't be my first stop.
Reply to
Jim S
In my opinion. Screwfix offer a superb service. I ordered a drill/screwdriver drill from them recently. It was delivered the next day but unfortunately the Hi/Lo speed switch didn't work. After one phone call, a replacement drill was delivered the very next day and the faulty item was collected on the following day, all without any charge. The new drill is twice as powerful as my old one, has two fast charge batteries and cost me £5 less than I was quoted for replacement batteries for the old one (which unfortunately was binned - minus the batteries of course) It's not top of the range like a Makita or Dewalt but if it lasts me a year or two, I'll be very happy.
BTW, I have a Black & Decker single speed mains drill (with a metal earthed body) which is over 50 years old and is still in working condition after a lot of hard use, both by my father and myself, without ever being repaired. I wonder if B & D would be interested if they have a museum. Sadly, most modern equipment seems to have built-in obsolescence.
Terry D.
Reply to
Terry D
A chap that was teaching me earlier this year had a 1960's B&D router - lovely build quality and still a great tool.
Reply to
dom
8<
Did you show him how to use it? Most of them are bought by dickheads who can't see speed cameras and they don't know how to use them.
Reply to
dennis
Indeed - just like a lot of kitchen-type electric stuff. Once upon a time you could buy replacement elements for kettles; nowadays you're expected to simply throw a new kettle in the latest colour (pink?) into your trolley at the horriblemarket.
My dad's first leccy drill was a Bridges (pre-Stanley Bridges) ¼" single-speed (of course) thingy in a grey metal case. He had all sorts of accessories such as a drill stand, a saw table, rubber and metal sanding disks (ISTR that you stuck sandpaper on to the metal disk with adhesive from a stick), lambswool polishing mops, et. al. I burnt the machine out in about 1967, using a 2" or so holesaw in ¾" chipboard. The machine just slowed down and emitted that awful smell of overheating armature... He was away at sea, so I just 'lost' the drill, and bought a B&D, which didn't fit any of the original accessories, nor did it last five minutes.
Reply to
Frank Erskine
On 17 Nov,
What model is it? I still have my father's B&D model 1 (and the receipt for it) purchased mid 50s. I occasionally use it for drilling in confined spaces as it is shorter than more modern drills. I also (I think) have the vertical stand for it in the loft. It screeches a little now with a worn bearing. I wonder if they still do spares?
Reply to
<me9
Screwfix is not for people who need help with ordering supplies, nor for people who want less than £50 of gear at a time.
Reply to
Ed Sirett

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