Ping TMH (Patio canopies)

Riverside Cottage 5...
Some years ago, in a fit of excess funds, my sister had a patio canopy installed. Now considered redundant!
3m wide and mounted on 75mm box section steel uprights through patio slabs.
How likely am I to recover the uprights from the usual installation technique?
The canopy is weathered but otherwise appears in good order. Cutting the posts off below patio level will destroy any re-use value.
Any thoughts?
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 18/06/2016 10:37, Tim Lamb wrote:

Alas I've never installed one like that, mine always bolt to the wall. Bear in mind that you can buy a 3m budget awning new for £150, is it worth the bother?
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK. This is a chalet bungalow so I guess it had to be self supporting. I can see your problem with getting that weight up that high!
I had a nose round e-bay after posting and could not find anything to match.
I'll get the slabs up and have a look. Prolly postcrete which should split.
It will be in the way of the builders putting in a dormer so got to go.
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 18/06/2016 10:37, Tim Lamb wrote:

Dig down to the concrete, drill a line of small holes and then split it with a chisel.
It might still be usable cut off at ground level if you use some fencing bases like ..
http://www.ironmongerydirect.co.uk/products/gate_fence_and_shed_hardware/fence_post_shoes/485009/fence_post_bolt_down_shoe/715008
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dennis@home.?.invalid writes

OK Dennis. Yours to fetch:-)
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 18/06/2016 16:46, Tim Lamb wrote:

Can you post it if I send you a few books of stamps? 8-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 18 Jun 2016 10:37:03 +0100, Tim Lamb

Cut the posts at ground level and buy a piece of 80mm square section steel of appropriate length Slide the 75mm steel into the 80mm and weld in place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or a few bits of suitable angle.
I had thought of selling it when I first posted but I don't think the market needs any more.
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 18 Jun 2016 16:48:29 +0100, Tim Lamb

Would it be the sort of thing you could put on the front of a South facing garden located garage / workshop to give a little sun / rain protection, if working out in the front of the garage? Something you can roll / fold away in the bad weather?
Is it like the things you see in front of shops or am I thinking of something else?
If it is what I think it is and you end up de-valuing it by cutting it off at the ankles, I might be able to offer you something for it?
Cheers, T i m
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Similar but this is self supporting.

You'll have to top Dennis's book of stamps:-)
I'll put a photo up over the weekend.
The operation is manual with a long, cranked handle
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 18 Jun 2016 22:01:11 +0100, Tim Lamb
<snip> >>Would it be the sort of thing you could put on the front of a South

That could be better for me if I could take some of the weight on the 'legs' but just hold it back against the (pre-fab) garage?

That should be too difficult (depending on how big the book is). ;-

Cool.

I know the thing.
Cheers, T i m
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK Try this
http://s828.photobucket.com/user/TimLamb/library/
I'm not sure if the cranked arms should fully straighten. The canopy was taught as shown. The fringe is weathered but otherwise sound.
Any literature was dumped when my daughters cleared the house!
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 19 Jun 2016 09:55:37 +0100, Tim Lamb

Thanks for those Tim.

From what I've seen of them I don't think they do.

Understood.

;-)

And why 'clearing out' isn't (or shouldn't be IMHO) a 'bulk process'. ;-(
So, looking at the picture it looks like the canopy itself may be pretty std and has 'just' been bolted to the steels as a means of mounting it high enough (on that building) to be high enough at the lower end?
It also looks like there is a means of adjustment on the lower mounting bolts to set the 'fall' on the canopy? (Large enough to shed water but low enough to provide headroom).
What I don't get with any of these canopies is how you would mount something that could offer so much leverage (simply down to the mass of the frame and fabric dry, plus the mass of the material when wet and then wind loads) over such a short bracket?
Obviously it must work (especially when bolted to 75mm Sq steel box sections <g>) but ... ;-(
So, unless you (now) want to advertise / sell the canopy on it's own elsewhere (unless there may have been additional wall mounting brackets that will have been thrown with the instructions?) then I'll check the width of the garage and get back to you if I may?
On that, could I ask you to measure the distance between centres on the mounting brackets please Tim as that could be a deal breaker on my steel / concrete / timber garage fascia.
Cheers, T i m
p.s. Would you think the material would be waterproof (if I wanted to use it for a bit of temporary rain protection)? If it's std canvas I think it is waterproof naturally as the fibres swell up when wet (I think I remember from cotton tents).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/06/2016 12:02, T i m wrote:

They definitely don't! If they ever did, you couldn't retract the awning!

My thoughts exactly. The height is one reason, but you can't fit an awning that close to a roof line, in high winds it could damage the few courses of brick above it.
If used on a two story building the vertical posts wouldn't be required.

There usually is, the method varies. 15 degrees is the standard. TAN 15 will give you the measurements.

That looks about 4 metres wide? The ones I install have 3 HD brackets each with 4 fixing bolts & I either use Thunderbolts if I can see the brick, or resin if I can't.

Usually polyester. They are rain proof, but in heavy rain the cover will touch the arms and you get drips.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 19 Jun 2016 12:58:56 +0100, David Lang

I thought there might be something like that but I can't remember 'how' they do work now?

<snip>

And I was thinking that as well

I'm not sure I could get a good anchorage for something like that into this Victorian house (with soft 'stock' bricks) on any wall! On an A.R. aerial I mounted on the back I bolted the bracket *though* the wall. ;-)

Cheers.

I think Tim mentioned it was around 3.

Do you mean one at each end and one in the middle? I would have thought the middle was more difficult to find a good anchorage with?

If I get this and fit it to the front of the garage (workshop) I will have to see what I can do as at the place I would want it, it's a wooden facing on a wooden frame (low apex roof) over the door so I might have to bring some steel box up from where the door frame bolts through the concrete panels and then onto the brackets.

<snip>

Ah, ok.

Understood.
Any idea if you can (typically) get replacement canopies as I know from many motorcycle and trailer covers how any of this synthetic stuff seems to get destroyed by the sun? ;-(
Cheers, T i m
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/06/2016 21:42, T i m wrote:

The arms are spring loaded and under torsion, There is a cable inside the torsion bar that either lets it go out or winds it back in.

Resin anchors are the answer!

Yes. Although a 3m only has one at each end.

? No, can't see why?

http://www.primrose-awnings.co.uk/30m-awning-covers-c-149_332_347.html?src f_cat_list

--
Dave - The Medway Handyman

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 19 Jun 2016 22:40:06 +0100, David Lang

Ah, makes sense (and why they have to keep some bend in them).

<snip> >> I'm not sure I could get a good anchorage for something like that into

Again, I've seen them mentioned but not used them myself. My worry (with this place) is that no matter how good an anchor you got on a brick that it didn't pull the brick out of the wall as the mortar is mostly sand. ;-(
<snip>

I can't see from Tim's pictures but are there *specific* mounting points on the rear of the canopy frame or are they 'slots'?

I'm assuming you are typically putting these things over patio doors and so the middle (specifically) might be on the soldier course could be just sat on the front of a Catnic lintel? If it was higher up the wall then I guess it should be ok.

<snip>

Thanks very much for that David. So these things are reasonably generic or did you link to those because you know they will fit that canopy (from experience)?
Cheers, T i m
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/06/2016 23:17, T i m wrote:

Ah! Resin anchors don't come out - ever! With enough force the anchor would remain & pull out the brick. Bear in mind though that the load is spread over 8 or 12 fixings.

I don't know that make, but it varies. With the ones I install (Primrose) there are 4 types of awning, basic, standard, half cassette & full cassette.
With the basic, standard & full cassette you have a foot or two either way, so plenty of play, but with a half cassette there are specific mounting points so you only have about 10mm tolerance, so they are my least favourite.

Normal height is 2.5 metres, so it's well above lintel height. Besides, the centre bracket is really there to spread the weight & stop the awning twisting.

No experience of that canopy, but essentially its a bit of fabric.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 19 Jun 2016 23:54:02 +0100, David Lang

The latter would be my fear on this house, or pull the brick apart.

Is it always though? On the picture of Tim's awning there looks like only 4 bolts and therefore (two per side, top and bottom) and ignoring dynamic loads (wind) most if not all of the weight of the extended canopy and frame would generate torque that would be transferred into pure tension on just the top two bolts?
With the awning closed, most of the load will be carried over all 4 bolts via shear.
I predict you could remove the bottom bolts on any of these awnings and nothing (bad) would happen.
<snip>

Ok.

Understood. ;-)

Yes, looking back at the videos on the page you linked I could see they looked quite high.

Ok.
<snip> >> Thanks very much for that David. So these things are reasonably

Sure, but it's those little 'gotchas' where one system / make requires a loop / hem sewn into the end to attach it to the roller and one doesn't etc. Or the one for the '3m' awning is 20mm wider than the other one for the '3m awning'. ;-(
Interesting stuff so thanks David.
Cheers, T i m
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My recollection is that this particular one had virtually no use: my sister being an acquirer rather than a user!
The fringe is permanently exposed to sunlight however.
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.