Parquetry box with very dry flaking veneer

What can I apply to a small wooden box with very dry and flaking veneer to nourish it before I attempt to restore it ? Eventually I hope to french polish it so it would have to be something compatible with this. Also I need to reglue fragments of veneeer. What would be the best glue to use?
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Anna wrote:

If you're going to restore it why worry about it flaking? whatever glue you use will prove to be a bugger to get off eventually.
I've just covred an old french clock case in veneer using a thin layer of PVA, even though it was thin it still had to be pressed with rubberised roller to get the excess glue out. Stuck rather nicely.
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

I 'm thinking that an application of an oil or wax would prevent further flaking and also make any traces of glue easier to remove.
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

Thats why superglue is so good.
On it gees and down goes the veneer in seconds. You will need to sand all the crap off it anyway if doing a decent restoration job, and the surplus CA will come with it.
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Sorry I beg to differ,when using veneer it requires a medium drying adhesive so that any fancy work(Inlay) can be positioned into place, SG dries on contact and if a mistake is made its very hard to put right,whereas PVA can be wiped of the surface and the intricate work redone. The case I'm on about had intricate inlay and there was no way I would have attempted SG on it.
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You can get slow superglues. Zap-It make thick stuff called Slo-Zap for modellers.
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Skipweasel
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

The way I do that is to position dry, pin, and then use thin CA that wicks in under the piece..its a quick'n'dirty way to do intricate woodwork. Works for pieces up to about 20mm max dimension - bigger and it doesn't wick to the center....medium CA works then..you get a couple of seconds 'shuffle time'..
Bigger than that, yes, a PVA aliphatic is probably better but you must clamp hard, and it slows you down..at least 10-15 mins to grip..
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Anna wrote:

Cynaoacrylate. To glue it.
Not sure how you 'nourish' a dead tree however.
I've used sanding sealer to get a sheen, but if french polishing, use that instead.
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

He's posh,he means super glue.
Very tuff glue to rub down if it gets through the parquetry sides, not rcommended.
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

I don't find it tough at all. Its tougher than balsa wood, yes, so you need to block sand, but its not much different from a hardwood in hardness..Its better than PVA which goes rubbery and clogs the sandpaper.
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I would not use anything like that.
Dave
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Anna wrote:

If the piece is old the veneer will almost certainly be fixed with hide glue. This is bought as 'pearls' and heated, with water, in a special pot. It has the advantage that it can be reheated to correct mistakes.
Complex parquetry is done by sticking the bits of veneers together first using special paper tape (it washes off afterwards).
If re-gluing hide glue, you may just need to reheat it with an old iron set low.
There are lots of books on veneering technique, if the piece is valued you should read one first. All the talk here of Superglue and PVA fills me with dread.
R.
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Richard Downing wrote:

Hide glue was the only available wood type of glue at the time,there where no man made glues available. And as its pointed out elsewhere in this thread Hide glue has a tendancy to breakdown ie *become brittle* after so long.
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Best book (by far) on furniture restoration is Bennett's "Discovering and Restoring Antique Furniture:" (Amazon.com product link shortened)
You should track down a copy of this before doing much more.
A few comments
- It's meant to be dry. Dry is good for timber. It's also not that dry anyway, because it will be in equilibrium with the atmosphere it's kept in. In an English winter this could be quite damp.
- It certainly doesn't need "nourishing", feeding, oiling, moisturising or conditioning. It's wood, not Jennifer Aniston's hair.
- Veneer itself doesn't go dry and flake, the adhesive beneath it is the source of the problem. Now for repair work it's usually a good idea to use whatever materials were used last time - and that's probably hide glue, used hot.
I wouldn't use PVA. I wouldn't personally use PVA for veneering anyway, although used in a hot-press drymount process it's not actually a bad choice. However I wouldn't use it new on old work, because compatibility is a problem. It certainly won't be happy used cold and wet over hide glue.
CA is terrible stuff to use because it's so unforgiving of mistakes. You might achieve good results, but chances are that you won't.
If you're concerned about using hot hide glue, use cold hide glue insted (Titebond do a decent one).

Shellac is the universal finish for anything you're unsure of. It's compatible with nearly anything both above and below it. Use decent quality though - Liberon's, from somewhere with decent turnover.
Axminster can sell you any materials you might need, right down to paper veneer tape.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

English SUMMER you mean.
If you are keeoping it indoors.
Winter inside is utterly LOW hummidity if you have any heating at all,.

Can you see the contradiction in the above?
'Glue has failed: Use more of the same to repair'

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Andy Dingley wrote:

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