Painting of ceiling...

I'm going to be painting the ceiling of a 9' x 10' bedroom soon, but I'd like some advice on preparation before I start. The room is upstairs in a corner of the house, and instead of being totally level, on the two edges of the house where the eaves are, it slopes diagonally about 30 degrees down about 1'6" in from the wall down to about 1" lower than the height of the rest of the ceiling. I've attempted to reproduce it in ascii art here, except the angles may be wrong.
------------------------------------------------- - - -
Also in the corner of the room, one of the main roof beams protrudes about 6" through the ceiling where the ceiling slopes to meet the eaves. This is at the juncture of the two sides which slope down as described above.
The ceiling was papered with lining paper in 1998, but due to the beam, it was more convenient for the decorator to paper the ceiling which drops down at an angle with paper running perpendicular to each other, rather than having each one run parallel. As a result, all the other pieces are running (parallel to the window) with a piece perpendicular to the rest at one end.
I would like to know some way of covering up the joins in this lining paper as they are visible, the ceiling was painted once in 98, but it didn't hide the joins. Some of them are coming away at the joins and some air has got in where the ceiling slopes down and flexes when you press it with your finger. Also, the previous decorator didn't do such a good job of cutting around the light fitting and it's jagged. Furthermore, when the wallpaper was stripped off, a small amount of lining paper was torn off, about 6" by 1', which I'd like to cover up without having to repaper. On top of that, the ceiling has been stained with nicotine and what I can only assume is soot from when my younger brother tried to singe insects with a cigarette lighter(!!) gathering round the light fitting.
So, what do I do to cover up all this mess before I paint, and what type of paint do I paint it with?
Marcus
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
message

of
down
running
end.
paper
hide
in
finger.
the
stripped
I'd
has
of
Marcus,
Steam off the lining paper. Rub down the ceiling with coarse sand paper to remove any odd bits of paper. Make good any nasties in the plaster with polyfilla. Use a gloss paint (any old tin) where the nicotine stains are to stop them coming through. Size it by painting with wall paper paste and leave to dry. Then re-line it with 1000 grade lining paper. Round the light fitting you should be able to slacken off the two fixing screws (having unscrewed the cover with power OFF) which will let you tuck your new paper behind it to make a nice neat job. Then paint with emulsion paint.
I have taken to painting lining paper whilst it is still damp from hanging - this seems to avoid the bubbles that form if you leave it to fully dry before painting (admittedly they shrink away when the paper re-dries but you know it isn't stuck properly there).
I was forced to try this when I had to do a complete flat in a weekend between tenants and was amazed how much better it looked - now I do it all the time but I do mix the paste rather thickly !
Andrew Mawson Bromley, Kent
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

a
edges
down
the
about
is
it
got
my
Was hoping I wouldn't have to remove the lining paper, just mask the joins in some way, as it is still in pretty good condition.
Make good any nasties in the plaster with

to
Won't be any nicotine if I take the paper off, but don't really want to do that.
Then re-line it with 1000 grade lining paper. Round the light

Couldn't I use a light covering of some kind of filler?

hanging -

you
Thanks,
Marcus
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.