Non slip easy clean kitchen floor covering

Please can anyone recommend a suitable non slip (very important) and easily cleaned (secondary) kitchen floor covering material either roll or floor tiles. Tiles would be a lot easier for me as the place is a horrible irregular shape with random angles everywhere.
I realise my requirements here are somewhat contradictory. Easy clean generally implies smooth and shiny. But what is the best compromise?
The existing carpet tiles are very good on the first count but lousy on the second and my elderly parents now have slightly too many spills in the kitchen for carpet tiles to last.
Any suggestions for a thin thermally insulating underlay as well? (they feel the cold)
The kitchen floor needs some serious maintenance as it feels to me like some of it is no longer supported underneath (a cowboy builders problem where the original house meets the extension). It lasted about twenty years before this fault showed up so I suppose I shouldn't complain.
Some underfloor supports appear to have been wedged on bricks at one end from what I can see with a mirror and torch down the doormat hole.
Thanks for any suggestions.
Regards, Martin Brown
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wrote:

If the floor is bouncy, the joists may have rotted. If it is supported on a pile of bricks you definitely have a potential problem.
It should be ventilated under timber floors to discourage rot.
If you can't get near to check out, the only way to be sure is to take up boards in the suspect area to see what's what. Needs to be done before you spend money on any new floor covering
Thin and good insulation are words that don't go together.
You can buy floor sealants that are non slip. But tiles etc intended for flooring are inherently non slip.
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On 29/11/12 08:53, harry wrote:

use carpet tiles and simply lay with tack adhesive, and keep 20-30 in reserve to replace those that get damaged beyond repair..
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On 29/11/2012 09:29, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Sorry - not good enough. That solution would last less than a year. That method has worked so far but there are just too many spills now. The new floor has to be easily cleanable of food spills on a more or less daily basis. The non slip factor is the most important though.
Regards, Martin Brown
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On 29/11/12 09:52, Martin Brown wrote:

best go with vinyl then.
and buy them a magic mop
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<snip>
Although relatively expensive compare to carpet tiles, Flotex carpet should fit the bill for non slip and easy clean.
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[Not even bunny]
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On 29/11/2012 09:10, David WE Roberts wrote:

OK. Thanks for that. It is clear to me that the only way in is to rip the old floor up but in my elderly parents kitchen it is more than a bit tricky to keep it safe. Not helped by my father insisting that it is "perfectly safe" and nothing to worry about.
I have to get all the bits ready and do it in a weekend or else.
It goes down about an inch with my static weight on it and there is a pile of bricks fallen over well out of reach in the underfloor space (which is ventilated). Looks to me like the cowboys left joist ends floating in the air exactly in front of the back door - highest traffic load position so it was bound to go wrong sooner or later. My instinct is that only the high tack glue on the carpet tiles and tiling pattern in relation to the chipboard underneath is preventing total collapse.
Regards, Martin Brown
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On Nov 29, 8:41am, Martin Brown wrote:

Studded rubber, but it will deteriorate with prolonged exposure to oil/ grease.
Owain
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On 29/11/2012 16:35, Owain wrote:

I'd go for non-slip vinyl. http://www.antislipvinylflooring.co.uk/ (no connection.) I am pretty sure that Altro is the stuff I had in mind. It has a slightly abrasive finish, so easy to clean and very non-slip.
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In article

;-)
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it's a ba-na-na . . . .
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On Thu, 29 Nov 2012 21:23:14 +0000, fred wrote:

Well it's that or some form of ribbing, surely?
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