No-salt water softener

Has anyone here used one of these no-salt water softeners?
http://www.centralheat.co.uk/monarch-scaleout-no-salt-water-softener-s15t.html
short version:
http://tinyurl.com/zn93kl9
"Almost all the benefits of fully softened water" is the claim, and at a much lower price.
Many thanks.
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Bert Coules wrote:

It seems to be a plumbed-in equivalent of a Brita filter, I use the latter for the coffee machine and to make ice cubes, but it will only reduce, not eliminate, limescale. Therefore it may not have the expected benefits for a whole-house installation.
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When they don't bother to spell out how it works, and don't provide any chemical analysis of the water before and after...
Someone must have done some tests on their system.
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Sounds like snake oil to me. If you remove the limescale it has to go somewhere, and that place is probably going to be in the pipework of the non salt softener, or shock horror, its all abig con. Brian
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On 04/12/2016 10:49, Brian Gaff wrote:

You can soften water chemically. Washing powders used to do so using phosphates. They were reduced/removed because of the environmental damage they do when they get into the rivers. I wouldn't be surprised if they had phosphate blocks in the machine that slowly dissolve over a year or two. The clue would be in the words "food grade", you can still buy phosphates as food grade.
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Not if you turn it isnt something much more soluble.
Not saying that this device does that, but the ones that use salt clearly do that.

This one could see the chemicals end up in the resin and since that does need periodic replacement, likely is where it ends up if it works.

The electronic ones clearly are since there is no known way to turn the relatively insoluble salts into much more soluble salts purely with an electric or magnetic field.

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On Sat, 03 Dec 2016 11:40:50 +0000, Bert Coules wrote:

s15t.html

We had a phosphate balls water treatment installed on the mains side of our boiler.
As far as I know it used food grade phosphates which slowly dissolved; you had to change the balls in the container every few years.
The hot water tap didn't seem to fur up.
Not as effective as a whole house water softener as far as I can recall, but then we only used it on the hot to prevent the combi boiler furring up.
Cheers
Dave R
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Many thanks to everyone for the replies and links. Very helpful and indeed illuminating: I've decided to embrace the traditional technology.
I see that Monarch, makers of that no-salt unit, also have a conventional machine in their catalogue: a two-chamber block-salt model which seems very similar to the Kinetico softener I had at a previous house. The most obvious difference is that the Monarch is about half the price. Searching for reviews and opinions online I have so far failed to turn up a single one, which might or might not be significant.
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I've now installed the Monarch block-salt model. Build quality is certainly not as high-end as the Kinetico I used to have, but in every other respect the Monarch seems to be fine. Thanks to everyone for the thoughts and advice.
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