Name That Tune

Hi All,
I remember a film from my youth (well, I saw it in my youth, I suspect it w as made late 50s or 60s)
In my minds eye, it is B&W, but then so was the device I was watching on pr
obably......
A young girl discovers a stack of 78s and discovers her father was a jazz m usician.
Her friends think it’s nonsense, how could it be?
It’s a bit cheesy, and I’ll spare you any more detail as it would be spoilers.
Does anyone know the title?
(It’s not The Jazz Singer).
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On 02/07/2020 04:57, snipped-for-privacy@o2.co.uk wrote:

Probably
Red Nichols and his Five Pennies
The film was called the 5 Pennies
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0052809/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsBJcSLIu5k

It was shown recently on the Talking Pictures channel and meant to be loosely based on his life. Although watchable it was a very cheesy and IMO the star of the film Danny Kaye played Danny Kaye rather than Red Nichols. There is a scene in the picture after Red gives up playing and during the daughters birthday party someone discovers some 78s but few at the party believe that Red was once famous and played with Glen Miller, Louis Armstrong etc. Unless the daughter had a bad memory she would have known as when younger she was dragged around the venues. His daughter had Polio and at at the end of the film she walked again unaided during his first comeback gig where all the other famous jazz musicians turned up to support him - cheese with more cheese.
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Yes, I vaguely remember that as well. It was very, well dated when I saw it. Cringe making, but then its another era altogether. Try watching other films of the period and the language makes them sound very odd. Lots of stiff upper lip and understating of things. Brian
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On 02/07/2020 08:45, Brian Gaff (Sofa) wrote:

I've been tuning into the Talking Pictures channel recently where they are showing many British "B" pictures of the 1950s and 60s and it's interesting to see how social attitudes have radically changed.
Warning: the acting in some of these films is seriously bad and some of the plots are full of holes. There was a film the other day starring Jack Warner (playing a police inspector) where they asked the possible parents to come and identify a body - probably forgetting at the time that it was headless body and they hadn't found the head.
It seems that every "mastermind" crook in the post war UK had a gun not handed after the war and owned a members only night club that looked more like a down market cafe. I think this popular sub plot feature was to give a starlet (never to be heard of again) and signed up to the film company a singing spot in the film.
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On Thu, 02 Jul 2020 09:44:40 +0100, alan_m wrote:

Interesting bit on TV last week about Talking Pictures itself.
It's run from thweir home by a retired film buff and his daughter. No other staff. The films are mostly (all?) from his own collection.
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Bob Eager expressed precisely :

Thanks, I didn't know that. I assumed it was some sort of company behind it, because it seems so very well organised.
They also show lots of BFI films too. Many of the films do have very poor story lines, but worth watching for 'the way things were' and the vehicles.
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On 02/07/2020 13:00, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

I always used to watch Westerns for the scenery. When I finally made it there it was just like the films...
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On Thu, 02 Jul 2020 13:00:53 +0100, Harry Bloomfield, Esq. wrote:

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2020/may/17/inside-talking- pictures-the-ultimate-in-lockdown-comfort-tv
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Bob Eager was thinking very hard :

Thanks for the link!
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Indeed. Contrast that with the BBC, BBC4 in particular.
Mr Talking Pictures and his daughter are presumably having to pay royalties on all the films they show along with managing all the technical difficulties involved. Which by the looks of things is all financed solely by adverts for mobility aids and dormeo matresses.
(At least so we thought, up until now ...)
The BBC are sitting on an archive going back 50 years of more. All their own material, which never gets shown. They occasionally broadcast showcase compilations on BBC4 such as say "Photography on the BBC" or "Architecture on the BBC" comprising clips from various documentaries they've made down the years. To some people at least its clear that these original documentaries would be well worth showing in themselves even in B/W; and the suspicion must be that it's only because they'd show up a lot of modern programming that they never see the light of day. The same goes for a lot of BBC drama as well both series and one offs.
Instead at weekends in particular they'd rather fill out BBC4 with endless reruns of "Top of The Pops" from the 70's and 80's and interminably repeated documentaries about Fleetwood Mac, Queen, Pink Floyd etc etc.
michael adams
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On 02/07/2020 14:19, michael adams wrote:

The BBC would rather you PAID to watch them(*) on Britbox :-(
(*) The programs that the BBC censors have decided that you should be able to watch.
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All the material on Britbox, which could be classed as popular entertainment, has already been issued on DVD and before that possibly on VHS.
Actual physical box sets of lot of the older stuff can be picked up new nowadays for around ?10 or ?20.
What I'm more concerned about are the less popular programmes which the BBC clearly have no intention of either showing again, or issuing on DVD
Take Jonathan Meades.
He;s made over 50 documentaries for the BBC
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Meades#Filmography
The BBC have issued one 3 disc compilation featuring only 10 of these films (which is still ten more than a lot of them will ever get, admittedly )
(Amazon.com product link shortened)93697185&sprefix=jonathan+Meades%2Caps%2C895&sr=8-1
To you squire ? How's about ?39 quid ?
michael adams
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On Thu, 2 Jul 2020 14:19:30 +0100, "michael adams"

He bought the rights (for peanuts?) to them when he realised that the main broadcasters weren't interested in them. It's in the Guardian article. What's not in the article is how they came to set up the TV channel. Would be interesting to know what the issues were/are with that.
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Peter Johnson explained on 02/07/2020 :

Yes, must have needed a lot of courage as a private individual, to just decide to go ahead and put on a brand new national television channel.
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On 03/07/2020 09:57, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Not so very much.
Tony sayer here has run radio stations. It is not either massively technically difficult not massively expensive.
As far as something like that channel does, if you can take business plan to potential advertisers, get them to guarantee revenue from adverts, plus some way to insert adverts, get the costs from whoever you pay to put the thing on a MUX, and get a decent broadband that can stream up to the MUX at a few Mbps, then take the whole thing to a bank or what have you for any extra funding needed, ..that is it.
Their real asset its the content they own.
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The Natural Philosopher formulated the question :

It's simple enough and cheap to set up an Internet streamed radio or TV channel, even I could manage that. I am not sure sure it would be so easy to set up a proper broadcasting TV station.
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michael adams wrote :

Yes, and we are paying for that oft repeated dross. All good stuff shown once, but it becomes dross when repeated so very often.
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It is more likely getting the necessary agreements to show very old stuff. Don't assume the BBC have the rights to show anything they ever made in perpetuity.
Feature films are easy. All you need is to pay the appropriate fee.
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On 03/07/2020 14:32, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I believe that is part of the problem. Without the BBC and licence payer money many programmes would not have been made at all but the BBC may only have the rights to show them a limited number of times.
And then there is the BBC censor airbrushing broadcast history in order not to offend the the snowflake generation.
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wrote:

To restate to the bit you snipped...
" They occasionally broadcast showcase compilations on BBC4 such as say "Photography on the BBC" or "Architecture on the BBC" comprising clips from various documentaries they've made down the years. To some people at least its clear that these original documentaries
Are you saying that while they were able to use clips for these compilations they wouldn't necessarily have been able to use the entire documaentaries ?

Only for programmes whose rights they sold to other broadcasters. The market for most of this stuff is small enough in the UK as it is, I can't imagine any English language braodacaster from abroad falling over themselves to buy up the rights at any time.
And little of any of this suff includes music which would attract prohibitive roaylty payments.
Stuff like drama which *is" sold abroad is widely available on DVD etc. THis material simply isn't. I quoted Jonathan Meades as an example. On his own website he commends a fan who's downloaded a lot of his suff onto Vimeo. That's how ridiculous the situation is. Watching 25 year old home recorded VHS tapes of his stuff even in LP mode with snow at the bottom offers better quality TV than most of the current BBC4 Dross. And all to pay Yentob's pension.
michael adams
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