moss and soil and a gravel drive

Well, it isn't really gravel. It's limestone, mostly one inch lumps. The limestone is a couple of inches deep, then there's six to nine inches of rubble underneath. There's 187 sq metres. In places moss has grown. I've killed the moss but under it the stone has a lot of soil mixed in, somehow. I'll have to scrape all this off and put new stone down, but how can I stop this happening again? I was wondering about waiting until the dry weather and getting some sort of blow torch thing? Ideas?
Bill
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You can't really "stop this happening again", gravel (or similar) drives need maintenance and 'stuff like soil' will always build up over time.
Our gravel drive has become easier to keep weed free as it has become more compacted (which does need fine material, whether sand or soil) but, especially around the edges where it is still looser it needs fairly regular weed killing.
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Chris Green
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+1
Loose gravel, however clean to start with, will eventually become clogged with fine sand/dirt/soil/whatever, and provide a fertile ground for moss and seedlings to grow in. There are (there used to be) things you could water on at regular intervals that stopped seeds germinating, but TPTB have decreed that the most effective ones are a health hazard and we're left with the second rank, which aren't so good. Early versions of 'Pathclear' were good, recent versions not so good.
A flame-gun will just burn off weed top growth, and neither will it do much to stop dormant seeds down in the cracks from germinating the following day. Fun to use, but not a long-term solution.
Alternative approaches are tarmac and concrete. If you're going to the expense of having the old gravel removed and replaced, they're worth considering, especially the first.
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Chris

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If you put down anti weed membrane and then at least 50mm of gravel on top this will not prevent soil (usually composted Leaves) from filling inbetwee n the individual gravel but it will prevent weeds from developing deep root s making them easy to remove either by pulling out or chemical gardening.
Richard
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But how does one get rid of moss in a lawn which is often very very wet? Brian
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Brian Gaff wrote:

You kill it with ferrous sulphate ... but that leaves the question of how you get rid of the moss, which is now dead and black.
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On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 13:39:20 +0000, Chris Green wrote:

Yep. Just tell your gardener to keep it clear. They'll just have to regulary hand weed it(*) or rake it.
(*) or every time a weed becomes big enough to pull, pull it.
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Dave.
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On Thursday, 10 January 2019 13:29:14 UTC, Bill Wright wrote:

The only solution is tarmac. I have blocks. Weeds grow in the cracks, need dealing with twice a year.
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Wrong, concrete works fine.

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On Thursday, 10 January 2019 13:29:14 UTC, Bill Wright wrote:

you won't stop it happening.
NT
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On 10/01/2019 13:29, Bill Wright wrote:

The moss is there because of poor drainage. Soil will invariably find its way into the gravel by being wind borne dust and also breakdown of leaves that fall on the path and get run over by vehicles.
Around 4" layer of limestone might be deep enough to drain cleanly. It is much worse if the area is north facing and so stays wet for longer.
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Regards,
Martin Brown
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Bill Wright wrote:

Pressure washer ?
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On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 22:22:49 +0000 (GMT+00:00), "Jim K.."

Bottom heat promotes propagation and growth!
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Chris

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On 10/01/19 13:29, Bill Wright wrote:

You may have to forgo the DIY bit and get a pro in to spray the drive with a specialist weedkiller and germination preventer. See, for example, "Paradise" and "Chikara" here: <https://www.progreen.co.uk/problem/driveway-weeds
It /might/ be possible for you to get some and DIY, but they aren't cheap and the spraying will have to be repeated after 6 months.
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Jeff

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If you're as old as me you may be able to go on a 'Grandfather Rights' training course and become licensed/legal to spray effective weedkiller yourself. This is what I did and so I can now continue to spray herbicide on our fields (to keep the ragwort down) and on our drive to kill everything. The people who sell bulk herbicide do now actually check if you are qualified/licensed (though I'm not sure how thoroughly).
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Chris Green
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On 11/01/19 10:06, Chris Green wrote:

True, but obtaining certification isn't cheap - around £500 - 600. See bottom of page here: <https://www.newlandstraining.co.uk/pesticide-application/grandfather-rights/
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Jeff

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Mine cost somewhat less than that, around £350/400 if I remember right at my local Suffolk Agricultural College.
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Chris Green
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Yes, I know, that's why I needed to go on a course and get qualified!
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Chris Green
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On 10/01/2019 13:29, Bill Wright wrote:

Limestone is completely wrong for vehicular hardstanding. It isn't strong enough to withstand being crushed and ends up looking like numpty diy concrete where the wheels have flattened it.
then the moss and weeds take hold ....
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