Misting DG window and drilling glass: a result!

On 15/09/2014 16:43, Tim Streater wrote:

Do you have any figures as to how much air can be forced, by wind pressure alone, through a pair of, say, 3mm holes, especially if not aligned across the two panes?
Do you have any figures for how much air can be forced, by wind pressure alone, through the seals round the glass, between inner and outer frames, round hinges, between wall and frame, etc., in a fairly ordinary house?
Anticipating your answer, I'll say "Me neither", but I'd be surprised if the glass holes allowed anything like as much as the rest of the window/frame/wall.
--
Rod

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It's not going to matter too much if they're aligned or not. Wind pressure will force air into the gap between the panes, which will then be forced out into the room.

Really? When we moved here, there'd fairly recently been extension work. All the new windows were wooden double-glazed, so we thought, that's OK. Wrong. They were all extremely poorly sealed, and cold air came round the edges of all of them (the DG units themselves were OK).
So we had the whole lot replaced within six months. Result? One or two rooms are still getting cold [1] and I'm taking steps to fix that. But in the main, as the new windows have rubber seals and do not leak air, it's a major improvement.
[1] E.g. the kitchen. But I think there are holes to the outside in the outer wall, and cracks in the inner wall. So, strong wind and same result. That will get fixed when we redo the kitchen, as these issues are behind kitchen units.
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Strange the makers seal them, then.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 15/09/2014 19:22, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I didn't suggest for one moment that fully sealed panels wouldn't be better. And even that argon filling might not be a good idea. Just that the difference that a small hole will make is probably not that great.
--
Rod

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Nope, that's done to stop water getting in.
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Not if you understand how DG works.
Tim
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In article

It would seem many here don't.
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*The statement above is false

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

You in spades.
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Is that your arm I see waving?
Tim
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Save your breath. It's just Dave trolling again.
Tim
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On Mon, 15 Sep 2014 09:36:00 -0700 (PDT), JimK wrote:

Mix 'em with water - easier to get in and self-levelling.
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Right. You have some figures for this - or just another of your wild guesses?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Yep.

Nope.
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/ > Right. You have some figures for this
Yep.

Nope./q
Er shurely...
Nope Yep
?
Jim K
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Thanks for all the comments, here and in the earlier thread. For those wanting more information on the factors affecting the insulating ability of DG units, there's this: http://tinyurl.com/n7wzpnq
--

Chris

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My house used to have metal Crittall windows, set in wood, with rather Heath Robinson sliding secondary glazing. The gap was around 2.5 inches. Although the system was sort-of draft proof, it certainly wasn't airtight enough to stop flies getting in between. We eventually took the plunge and got modern double glazing, but I don't reckon it's anyway near as effective as the old stuff.
--
Ian

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Different argument. I was asking for figures for ordinary double glazing both sealed and open. Of course no one here actually knows.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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We aren't discussing open double glazing, JUST a couple of tiny holes in the inside pane.

Wrong, as always.
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Then I ask again why they are made sealed - and more expensive varieties use other than plain air inside.
Seems a lot of effort to go to if it makes no difference.
But then I'd not expect you to know the facts about anything.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

    I think you are nit picking. All double glazing units have some degree of breathing. That's why silica gel is used in the seals. You can't get a gas tight soft seal that's going to last 25years on edges up to 8M long. Filling with other gases gives a short term improvement, but units will mist when the seals break down. A small hole will have very little effect on a large panel as the heat exchange relies on air circulation within the panel, not from outside air being introduced.
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