Memories

Remember when if you bought a light bulb the shop would put it on a tester to show it worked?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/04/18 10:40, DerbyBorn wrote:

Yes - a nice little panel of live sockets at finger height on the counter in Victor Towler's in Banstead IIRC (1970s) :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ISTR these devices had a switch operated either by inserting the bulb or a lever adjacent to the socket, so weren't live when casual fingers touched them.
--

Roger Hayter

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/04/2018 11:41, Roger Hayter wrote:

The one I remember in Woolies had big pushbuttons at either side of the box. Both had to be pressed to power up the bulb, ensuring that both hands were well clear of the connector when it was live.
Must have been a very advanced safety measure for that era.
--
Mike Clarke

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oh yes they were. At least the one in our local shop was. I know tis as somebody dropped a nut in one once and phut. I'm sure switched ones were made, but this was certainly not one of them! Brian
--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes - and was told this wasn't a good idea. Burnt off the protective coating applied to protect the filament from vibration etc during transit.
--
*OK, so what's the speed of dark? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That sounds like an urban myth, most bulbs survived for ages in inspection lamps that were just chucked in the back of vans several times a day, and they were only using normal bulbs. Brian
--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Brian Gaff wrote:

I vaguely remember you could buy 'rough service' bulbs for inspection lamps which stood up to rough handling surprisingly enough!
--
TOJ.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/04/2018 19:31, The Other John wrote:

You still can rough service incandescent lamps if you want. It was an easy loop hole in the "ban" of incandescent lamps.
There seems little point in them now that LED lamps are so cheap. And the plastic LEDs bounce when you drop them:-)
--
Adam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, 19 April 2018 19:31:26 UTC+1, The Other John wrote:

You can still buy them. https://www.rapidonline.com/catalogue/search?Query=rough%20service%20lamps And I thought 100W incandescants were banned.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 20/04/2018 10:39, whisky-dave wrote:

But there was a loophole - 'special purpose' bulbs were permitted. So the energy saving reason for the ban was defeated by allowing rough duty bulbs which were less efficient than the banned standard bulbs.
--
Mike Clarke

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

... which likely never existed in the first place.
(Yes, yes, I know CRLs and LEDs are more energy efficient than incandescents, but they also cost a great deal more to make, and don't last as long as promised.)
--
Today is Setting Orange, the 37th day of Discord in the YOLD 3184
Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But do LEDs cost a great deal more to make? I'm willing to bet the markup percentage from factory cost to retail is a great deal higher than with tungsten.
--
*I don't have a solution, but I admire your problem. *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Tooling costs for tungsten must have been enourmous - but amortised over many years.
LED Tooling will be more generic to lots of other small circuits.Plus a bit of plastic.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Poundland has sold them for years. The power rating they can make for a pound slowly increases - I think it's up to 6W now.
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 21 Apr 2018 20:08:41 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

It's 6.6W for their 470 and (if you can still find any) 510 Lm GLS lamps. The standard "A bulb" types seem ok but the smaller golf ball versions seem to suffer premature failure (from a sample of just one), presumably from overheating due to their smaller surface area.
The £2.99 1500Lm "100W incandescent equivalent" in Home Bargains (claimed to be just 12W but on test, more like 14 to 15 watts), seem to survive ok in reasonably ventilated lamp holders.
Mind you, I had my suspicions about brightness of an early one (bought just over a year ago now) confirmed by comparison with a later one bought a couple of months ago so took it back about a fortnight before the basic 12 month warranty had expired and, after being handed an LES instead of the BC version in exchange due to my taking my eye off the ball due to the importance of colour temperature matching (I wanted a warm white 2700K version which the shop appeared to have run out of), I got a refund on return of the LES version.
I managed to find a warm white BC lamp in another of their stores a week or two later. I've never been tempted to try their cool white versions since the much higher cool white colour temperature of 6500K, rather than a more reasonable 4000K or even 5500K option rather puts me off them. Now, I'm thinking that perhaps I should try at least one just to see for myself just how cool (north sky light) they actually are.
The business of the specified actual consumption of LED GLS lamps turning out to be some 10 to 15 percent higher seems to be a common feature of all the LED GLS lamps I've bought over the past 5 or 6 years. As long as that just means they're slightly over-running a 12W LED at the same 125LPW efficiency level and they're still coping with the extra dissipation ok, as they seem to do, I don't mind since that means extra light over and above the claimed, in this case 1500Lm (about 1700Lm or so) which imo, is no bad thing.
It might be an effect due to the ballast being designed to meet a minimum lumens output requirement at the lowest end of the voltage tolerance range (207vac) when run on a 240v supply (or perhaps not - I'm only guessing at a possible legitimate reason for this consistent departure between fact and fiction).
The various wattage standards for incandescent GLS lamps were the result of compromise between acceptable light levels and acceptable energy costs (we were all in the same boat, service life-wise anyway). As a result, we came to accept a much lower level of light than would have otherwise been chosen if "Price had been no object". Now that the energy costs to run lamps with higher light levels associated with 100W incandescents are only about an eighth of what they once were, we can now sensibly choose by desired light levels alone rather than a compromise between running costs and light levels.
We're still less than halfway to the 303LPW level achieved in Cree's laboratory just over four years ago now so there's the promise of even higher efficacy lamps able to match 150 and even 200 watt incandescents without overheating in a standard GLS light fitting in the next couple of years.
Contrary to what Cree's CEO of lighting development and marketing claimed about the lead time for laboratory developments only taking some 18 to 24 months to reach the shop shelves, their own development landmark chart indicates a lead time of typically ten years which, in the case of their record breaking achievement of a 303LPW lamp in the lab way back in March 2014, means we could possibly see 280 to 300 LPW GLS lamps becoming available around 2024/2025. In the meantime, we might get to see equivalents to 150W incandescent GLS lamps appearing in the shops in the next year or two and we can all look forward to a brighter future. :-)
--
Johnny B Good

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DerbyBorn wrote:

Remember the foot x-ray machines in some shoe shops?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan S. MacAbre wrote :

Yep, it was fascinating to watch your toes wiggle in the shoes. Lewis's had one in Leeds centre.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 19 Apr 2018 13:14:52 +0100, Harry Bloomfield

Even better was to jam small brothers head into it and watch his jaw work as he complained..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/04/2018 16:29, Peter Parry wrote:

:-)
Just before your Mother gave you a good hiding?
--
Adam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.