Locations for gas boilers?

Where can you install a fan assisted concealed gas boiler?
Loft? Lounge? Kitchen? Bedroom? Bathroom?
Is it true that all gas boilers have to be condensing now?
I checked the odpm (John Prescott) website and it was stating that the all had to be!
Thing is they were also stating not to install a flue within 2.5 metre of a fence, wall or boundary with neighbours house!
Problem, Our terrace is only 14' wide so there is no where you can pu a flue! Or is that just there recommendation?
Any way I can not find a reasonably price HE Combi that will provid the same level of DHW as a standard combi will (Ableit Biasi an Ravenheat, but I read that they bodge there HE by just putting in secondary heat exchanger).
Can't I just have a normal boiler
-- andymason79
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andymason79 wrote:

I found that about 95% of all CORGI plumbers that I aked for a quote didn't have a clue about what is and what isn't regulation WRT boundaries which is a complete farce.
Facts I found were that your flue can go to within 30cm of bounday based on the fact that neighbour is legally allowed to build right up to the bounday so 30 cm will give an allowable gap should this happen.
Some thought you had to ensure Flue gasses didn't cross the boundary, one thought the gasses were acidic and would rot the neighbours wall (which is about 6' away) etc etc etc.
Main thing most said was "get a quote from British Gas" because if they say it can be fitted in place X we'll be able to follow suit at a cheaper price!
HTH
oh, BTW, father in law had a combi installed in a bedroom recently, so it seems anywhere goes.
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andymason79 wrote:

yes if boarded, lit, loft ladder, handrail round hatch if necessary to stop gas fitter stepping back & falling down hatch

No
Yes
I think so, but probablynot a good location

If not accessible to person within bath (see recent threads)

Sort of

I think the 2.5m is a recommendation so condensate plume doesn't cause annoyance drifting over boundary. There's a smaller mandatory clearance from boundary (forget the figure offhand)

Prices are still high since HE used to be apremium product. They're coming down but there's no reason they shouldn't get down to similar to non-HE used to be, so I'd wait until next year if possible.

Not unless your proposed installation meets a particular set of critera - usually only met for flats.
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stop
The rail depends on the space inside.

Yes. No reason whay it can't go there.

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On Thu, 27 Oct 2005 15:43:46 +0100, andymason79

Pretty much anywhere you like. I've just installed one in the loft. The flue goes out vertically through the roof.

Yes. Unless it is impossible to install a condensing boiler.

It may be someone's recommendation but it is certainly not a requirement. Half the boilers in my street would be illegal otherwise. 600mm from a surface facing the flue terminal is the minimum.

Doubtful.
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I put mine in my outside loo, which I refurbished at the same time. Amazingly it is possible to situate it on the wall directly behind the loo at practical height even for a vertical flue exit, you don't bang your head on the underside when you sit down or get up, because you naturally rotate your body forwards in either circumstance.
A great space saver, and it keeps the outside loo toasty merely with the waste heat from the combi.
Andy.
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Andy wrote:

Note that many HE boilers give out very little waste heat from the boiler casing...
--
Cheers,

John.

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My Keston gives out very little unless it's been on for a long time, but even then I doubt it's any more than 100W (although I normally have it set to only 45C flow).
--
Andrew Gabriel

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writes:

Use a two pipe flue arrangement, and taking as much flue pipe as possible around the room; the heat gained into the room is far more.
Fitting a Keston in a loft and taking the two pipe flue the length of the loft and terminating at the other end will heat the loft and certainly keep the temperature up in there. Boiler efficiency rises as well with longer flue lengths.
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> My Keston gives out very little unless it's been on for a

I was thinking of buying the Keston C36, it seems really good.
Does anyone have much experience of that model?
After the initial upward bend from the boiler, is it possible for th flue from the C36 to bend downward? Thus coming out of the soffit, o am I asking too much. I live in a terrace so out the wall is not a option and I don't like making holes through the roof!
Do you really have to install railings around the loft hatch?
I was thinking of buying the Keston C36, it seems really good. It flue through 50mm PVC pipe upto 20 metres.
I think this model can go under the stairs no problem, the 50mm pipe are a lot easier to put bends in and hide than a 100 mm standard flue!
Thanks
And
-- andymason79
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On Fri, 28 Oct 2005 21:21:51 +0100, andymason79 wrote:

I've fitted several C25s the C36 is very similar. I'm surprised that you can't the manual online. Let me know if you need to have a copy I can put on online for you. P15 of the manual section Section 3.8.3 Clearly states in emphasised bold type that there must be no troughs in inlet or outlet air/flue pipework.
--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk
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Ed Sirett Wrote:

Thanks I have downloaded the manual since from their website.
Are Keston good, do you know if the C36 is reliable? To be honest I had not heard of them until a week ago!
The keston has the major advantage that I can put it under my stairs all the rest would have to go into the loft because its not easy to ru a 100mm pipe out of a stair cupboard!
Also if all this large trap, loft ladder, boarded loft floor, han rail, isolation for all services and a pressure gauge outside of th loft stuff is true, when you add it on to the additional cost of vertical flue adapter, a special tile and pay a roofer to install tha tile its a lot of money without the boiler!
Can some one tell me what the difference between mupvc and upvc wast pipe is other than the former is three times more expensive? Because o Marley and Osma website they are both rated at 75 degrees C constan use!
Thanks
And
-- andymason79
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On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 09:47:26 +0000, andymason79 wrote:

The cost of the correct pipe is quite small relative to the cost of the entire installation. If you are diying this install you'd want to be even more sure that you are doing it all by the book?
Bear in mind that you will need to provide an addition condensate trap at the base of any large vertical sections e.g. one going into the roof.
--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk
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They are about the same quality as Worcester-Bosch. Viessmann, etc are the RRs

It isn't. You don't need isolation outside the loft. If a emergency you go to the meters and cut them off, as you would with any emergency. If a pressurised system, it may be handy to have a pressure gauge outside to occasionally monitor it.

The flue can be terminated through end loft gable wall, and all done from inside.

Former takes more heat.

If you extended using makers concentric flue pipe extensions, the pipe can work out more expensive than the boiler. If you have long flue lengths then the Keston, and few others, work out very cheap.
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Doctor Drivel wrote:

Is that correct about the isolatation valves? A Corgi who came to look at my boiler (in the loft) last week said there should be gas and water isolation valves just outside the loft. But the Corgi company who fitted the system ~5yrs ago didn't fit any.
Would be nice to know who is right. I have no intention of fitting any gas isolation valve mind you. Much easier to just shut off the gas at the meter as you said!
Regards, Jon.
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On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 12:01:54 -0800, Tournifreak wrote:

The issue is about being able to turn the boiler off for whatever cause on whatever service. If the occupant is infirm in some way it might not be possible from them to go into the loft.
Therefore external isolation is best practice and the firm that did not do it did a less than perfect job (which may have been excellant in every other respect).
--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk
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you go

Only electrical isolation. You don't need gas. Water? In modern house the raising main into the loft does have an isolation cock in the airing cupboard. That will do. Isolation is a safety issue. One electrical isolator that can turn of the boiler is all that is required for safety. If something is that bad you go to the meters.
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No. If the boiler is well away then no.
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