Levelling concrete floor

Thanks for all opinions.
The reason for the laminate, I've got experience of laying it and I haven't found a tile that I like (within my budget).
If I were to rip up the floor, waht would be involved?
Thanks
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It's worth spending the time to look. Try a variety of places, including trade ones, not just the DIY stores and volume warehouses.
For a recent project involving a cloakroom, I spent more time selecting and sourcing tiles than any other part of the project.

Normally something like a Kango hammer to break it up and then some graft to remove the lumps.
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Thanks.
What depth should I go down to.
And what about replacing what I've dug up? Materials, mixes, etc.
Sorry I'm completely ignorant about such matters.
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I'm confused here. You already have a concrete floor in your kitchen. It appears uneven only so far it is higher at one point than the other. Floor levelling compound only fills the immediate low points, it doesn't level the floor as such. 1" out in a few feet is normally regarded as level for all intents and purposes.
Why do you need to replace your floor?
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Tim wrote:

Apparently because spherical objects may not remain stationary if placed on such a surface. Indeed, items such as fruit and vegetables, may behave similarly. Such unpredictability is, frankly, unacceptable.
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So would tripping over at a step to another room......
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Andy Hall wrote:

And unless and until the OP explains further, no-one can really understand the problem and advise appropriately.
Is it a thin concrete layer that was put down very badly?
Has someone mixed concrete on top of a perfectly good slab and left it to dry?
Has a substantial slab tipped due to movement of the house?
Has the slab moved relative to the walls?
Is it a new or an old building?
Is the existing floor insulated?
What lies beneath the floor (e.g. cellar, chalk, clay, rock)?
Do any services run through/under the floor? (Drains, water, CH, gas, electricity.)
Is there a back door to think about?
Any chance of some photographs posted somewhere?
--
Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
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if you drop an apple or a ball on a perfectly level floor it will bounce and roll...
are you planning on having the world marble championship on your kitchen floor? or golf?
ledges at doors are a tripping hazard. BAD
a little slope might be good if water leaks on it
uneven floors however would puddle..
maybe kitchen floor should slope towards the middle so there arent puddles under the units etc making unnoticed dampness and mould
maybe you should dig an exploratory hole somewhere where you wont fall in it and see whats under the concrete.
maybe itd be worth insulating it.
maybe its already insulated, or dry underneath.
if its damp underneath then maybe a damp membrane would be worth doing, if dry then not.
depends on if the land is lower outside the house, and on many other things
interesting - ive got a kitchen floor to look at some time...
[george]
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Actually, I was being a bit (very) optimistic about the inch. The floor actually drops 3.5 inches over a 3 metre length.
My wife explained to me what an inch was. Apparantly she lied!
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Ouch!!
I feel that sort of gradient would be a bit noticeable. I have a policy that if it looks level it probably is, however with a slope like that I'd be tempted to build it up to make it nominally level. Rather than have a step, have a faster slope down into the next room. Not sure what else I'd do?
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If you want something REALLY flat
the atmosphere in any german bar would take some beating at the moment
--
geoff

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Wot, no Ein Prosit.?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGF1wFj9FSI

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Just an eins zu null ...
Oktoberfest - Yuck
--
geoff

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Quite.
I went to it once. Just the once. I think I went into the Loewenbrau tent.
At any rate, it was a production line. There was a tanker parked at the back with a hose about the size of one on a petrol tanker. This connected to the row of taps at the back of the bar whiich were pretty much solidly on - i\d guess about 20.
At the other side of the business, there was a building at the back with a lengthy urinal and people were supposed to shuffle sideways as they tiddled. This was to maintain the flow of traffic.
I'm not sure whether the loop was closed back to the tanker.
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We HAD to go, a sort of departmental ritual, relatively easy from Nuernberg
We got on the wrong train going back and ended up pissed as farts at 5am in Regensburg
I still made it into work on time - a true contractor ...

with an little old woman sitting there collecting your 20 pfennigs

Seems a shame when every town and village south of Wuertzburg has it's own Kirchweih which is far friendlier and more fun
Erlangen bergkirchweih was one of the best
Aah halcyon daze ...
--
geoff

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I've just replaced a kitchen floor, dug out the old concrete down 7", and provided sand, insulation, dpm, new concrete. It is quite a job if like me you haven't done it before. In retrospect, I'd do this: Get a good 6 foot spirit level. Put one end on the high point of the floor, and the other end at the lowest point that it'll reach. Prop the level at the lowest point with bits of wood until the bubble is in the middle. Measure the distance you've had to raise it. This is accurate. If it really is 2" over 2m, you need to renew the floor. If it's less than an inch over the whole floor, comprimise. Use screed or self levelling compound to get it close to 1/2 " . Raise the floor in the adjacent roomr by half the distance by putting an extra layer of insulation on it before the carpet/wood/laminate finish. The steps at the 2 thresholds will be negligable.
What are the length and width of your kitchen?
To
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Ah yes. ObPissup. The teutonic way.

It was the production line efficiency of it all that amused me.

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To answer some questions (and to ask some more):

floor? or golf?
No plans at present, though this could change.

How can I tell?

to dry?
How can I tell?

Don't think so, there are no signs of movement.

How can I tell?

Built 1950s, though it has been extended. The kitchen looks like it is built from blocks.

How can I tell?

I'm presuming clay/rock.

electricity.)
I'm pretty sure there aren't any, though I can't be 100%

No
How can I post the photos?
Cheers
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tvmo wrote:

Is the surface of the floor smooth and, although not level, is it even?
If not sort of suggests it is crap.
If you knock on the floor, does it sound hollow?
If so, means there could be voids below. Again, suggests not laid very well.
Does the room have obvious places where skirting boards have been replaced/reattached due to movement of floor relative to walls?
If so, suggests a possibly serious problem.
To be honest, digging it out and replacing, while a lot of work, mess, money - might be the best choice by far. Surely anyone who was competent would never have laid a floor as out of level as you report? But there is always a chance that it was done like this for a reason (albeit not a good one) and you will find out why as you replace it.
You do need to get advice on exactly how to construct the new floor. Others here know far more than I do about the best techniues.
There are lots of photo sites such as Flickr. I can't remember the last one recommended here. Search and you will find one. Upload and post links.
--
Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
  Click to see the full signature.
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Are you sure it wasn't you? Oh no. That would be the other way round. Probably.
I think that you are going to need to look at this on a more complete basis, measure up and do some proper assessment. This is beyond a bit of tweaking and filling, I think.
However, it's not horrendous either.
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