LED Christmas Lights - serial or parallel

wibbled on Thursday 26 November 2009 09:23

Do a binary chop - at most, assuming it's one failed bulb, you'd need to remove about 7 bulbs and test.
1) Pick a bulb half way along the test section (initially teh test section is the whole string)
2) Remove bulb
3) Test continuity between each bulb socket contact and L and N at the plug
4) If one contact is open circuit, determine which section that is (pull another bulb out if it's not obvious), and defined that as the new test section, marking your current position as the end of section (wrap of sticky tape). Goto 1)
4a) If both contacts are open circuit, you'll need to defined two test sections and goto 1.
5) Both contacts have continuity - throw the bulb away and put a good one in.
OTOH if you really (I know I would) arelooking for an excuse to buy an new set, delete this post and I won't tell :-)
--
Tim Watts

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I have a Homebase 40-LED set in which 3 near neighbours are out. It may be because I crunched one between wall and ladder last year, but there's no visible damaged. The rest of the chain works OK, so I guess it is a series/parallel arrangement. My plan is to buy a reduced-to- clear set in the sales for spares, unless someone knows another source? I assume they're all the same voltage (no internal resistors) regardless of chain length? Of course, the package says "non- replaceable bulbs", but, hey, this is uk.d-i-y.
Tip: When you take them down, wind them onto a cable drum to avoid tangling.
Chris
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