Inner tube repairs - is it just me ?

Ever since my first bike - over 40 years ago - I've never once had a single tube repair last.
Locate hole; scuff rubber; apply rubber solution; cut circular patch; let rubber solution go "hazy"; apply and press patch; talc to finish off.
Those that didn't leak immediately would last a day or two.
Then I started fixing car inner tubes (in the days when they had them). No better. Despite my Dad having a machine to heat and seal the repair. (And his repairs never lasted, either).
Last week SWMBO wheelchair (****ing thing) sprang a leak. I went for my *brand new* spare inner tube to discover the ****ing thing had a split.
Of course no cycle shop actually stocks these tubes (despite what any website tells you). So I took it to a local bike shop for *them* to repair.
You can see where this is going, can't you ?
In their defence, they advised a new tube too, and we are talking 140 psi.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/10/2017 10:53, Jethro_uk wrote:

Probably not much comfort, but I have always had reasonable success with pretty much that method.
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, 24 October 2017 11:08:50 UTC+1, John Rumm wrote:

Thta's what I do except I use ready made patches. It always works fine for me but my usual problem is nipping the tube with the tyre lever and creating a new puncture.
Since I switched to Schwalbe Marathon tyres I don't get nearly as many punctures as I used to.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've never found it necessary to use tyre levers to refit the tyre: if I press on the bead in one place, I can persuade it over the rim of the wheel, and than I can move my thumbs apart to ease the bead over gradually further and further from the starting point until eventually the whole bead is over the rim. The main thing is to make sure that during this process the tube doesn't move around the rim, leading to the valve ending up crooked in the hole through the rim.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Oct 2017 09:53:22 -0000 (UTC), Jethro_uk

<snip>
That's pretty well what I've always done and I can't say I've ever had a follow up problem with them? That said, I think I've generally used the pre-made patches (where you peel a backing and top protector off) so that may be a different solution to making your own patch?
How long are you (typically) leaving the repair before full re-inflation?
Cheers, T i m
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Oct 2017 11:10:45 +0100, T i m wrote:

Used both with equal lack of success.

The last one about 10 minutes. The guy in the shop was confident.
If they had a tube, I would have bought that, but it's hens teeth time.
(Have 2 winging their way to me as I type, now).
I appreciate in times gone by, when a tube was maybe £2 and a weeks wages were £30.
But the tubes I just ordered are £4.50 each including VAT. Most places charge £5 minimum labour anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Oct 2017 10:19:45 -0000 (UTC), Jethro_uk

Hmmm?

Ok, well, not as long as I might choose but needs must etc.

Quite.

;-)

And why we run Punctureseal seal in all our cars, motorbikes and trailers and a lighter 'slime' in all our cycles and cycle trailers (along with running puncture resistant tyres etc). Whilst they may make the wheel heavier and require more effort (both solutions), we aren't ever in competition, appreciate the added exercise and would rather that than have to stop for or suffer from the consequences of a puncture (like loss of control etc).
We would also already generally carry a spare tube for anything tubed, and with the advent of folding cycle tyres, even a spare tyre (between 2-3 of us)).
Cheers, T i m
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/10/2017 12:26, T i m wrote:

Certainly worth using slime or similar in a wheelchair, I would have thought. I have a spare bottle of Honda tyre stuff, I let the main agents do the first service on my s/h Jazz and they insisted on replacing it "since it goes out of date". This 6 year old stuff worked fine on a friend's wheelbarrow the other day.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Oct 2017 14:18:40 +0100, newshound wrote:

TX both for the nudge on that. Might have a squirt ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/10/2017 10:53, Jethro_uk wrote:

Probably not just you, but I have had relatively few problems in 55 years. It's often difficult to recover an old tube that has been flat for a while, though (wheelbarrows, etc).
One of my rules was never to leave a patched tube in a motorcycle front wheel (after I had one fail on a bike that I was recovering for someone). I only ever had rear punctures on my own bikes in my thirteen years riding (a bit less than one a year). But I normally carried a spare (used) tube for speed and convenience.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/10/2017 10:53, Jethro_uk wrote:

I have had very, very few bike patches fail?
The only different step I do is after I apply the patch I rub it with the blunt end of a pen until the backing layer, foil or plasticy paper, cracks. I then pull the backing paper off from the centre of the patch.
I used to do 5 or 6 a year but bike tyres have improved. I think I've only done one this year.
I pump my bike tyres up to 120+ psi. They go down to 80 in a couple of weeks but that is just general leakage not a bad patch.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Oct 2017 11:28:15 +0100, Nick wrote:

The tyres on SWMBO wheelchair are 1" - very narrow. It's a *real* struggle to get them to 140 ... I use a track pump but I have to bounce up and down to get the last 20.
They're down to about 80 every fortnight.
Solid tyres are available, but (to quote SWMBO) "they're shit."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/10/2017 12:21, Jethro_uk wrote:

Obviously the diameter of the track pump barrel/piston determines the force needed to get up to to 140 psi.
I use a Joe Blow Sport 2 pump which I just tested up to 140 psi. It did require a bit of force at the end but only for the final few strokes. I'm 77kg.
It is possible you could get a Track Pump with a narrower barrel which you might find easier.
I'm surprised you need 140 psi. On a 25mm/622mm wheeled bike 80 psi is generally good enough for a reasonably low rolling resistance and to protect against pinch flats. I only do 120 psi so I don't have to pump up so often.

Yep, I think she is right, that's why they aren't used on bikes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Oct 2017 14:59:28 +0100, Nick wrote:

70Kg ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Oct 2017 14:59:28 +0100, Nick wrote:

SWMBO can tell the difference. It's her arse and back that are in the firing line for most of the day ....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Oct 2017 16:17:17 +0100, Tim+ wrote:

Oh gawd no ...
part of the problem is the chair is a more "active" model - where narrow tyres (and wheels) are part of the design.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Oct 2017 16:47:39 +0100, Tim+ wrote:

Because you'll see it's a very odd size, and not stocked by a "real" shop.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Oct 2017 11:21:47 -0000 (UTC), Jethro_uk wrote:

My last girlfriend worked out that when her feet left the floor the tyre was OK. This was on 28 mm and about 80 psi. Now she's in a wheelchair and has small wheels with solid tyres (and so does the chair). She's not strong enough to propel herself. On her last chair there were small pneumatic tyres - a pig to change. I'm used to motorbike and pedal bike tyres, but these little ones... Almost worse than scrambler tyres.
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What that is daylight robbery. I'd have thought for what they charge for chairs that they would be unpuncturable, ie filled with gell.
I know some of the little buggies are like that.
I don't know about modern tubes, but my late father hardly ever had to buy a new tube as repairs just worked, indeed it was often the strongest part of the tube thereafter. Has the glue or the material the tube or patches changed over the years for some environmental reason?
Brian
--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Oct 2017 12:13:02 +0100

No puncture-proof pneumatic tyre replacement has the ride quality, grip or weight advantages of an air-filled tyre, in an application like pedal cycles or wheelchairs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.