I broke a gate valve.

In my fumbling enthusiasm to get out from under the kitchen sink, I overdid the leverage and broke the spindle of a seized gate valve. So now it can be turned forever in any direction with no effect.
Will I have to replace the whole thing, or can I remove the guts from the main body of the valve and renew just those inner parts?
In my next life I intend to move into my retirement accommodation long before I become "stiff where once I was supple, and supple where once I was stiff".
--

Mike

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It's probably easiest to replace the whole thing except the nuts and olives. I've replaced a couple with full-flow lever type valves which have fitted the same nuts and olives OK. If you replace with same/similar gate valves then remember to turn back half a turn or so from fully on or fully off, though I'd recommend lever type valves instead really.

:-)
--
Chris Green
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I think you're right, replacing the whole thing with a lever valve would be best.
It's just that I'm concerned about being able to temporarily increase the gap between the pipe ends to let the new valve in, without unwanted knock-on effects.
--

Mike

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It is most unusual for pipe work to be that ‘tight’ you can’t wiggle it enough to get a gate valve or other fitting out to swap it.
I’d measure the one there and try to find a near replacement- most are around the same size. While, in theory, you should replace olives, they can generally be reused if you clean then- I use a nylon pan scrub. Check they aren’t damaged etc.
A tip for next time. If a tap or gate valve is seized, undo the gland nut a fraction of a turn then try it. It generally works. Don’t forget to retighten.
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wrote:

All good advice thanks.
--

Mike

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On 11/09/2019 09:12, Mike Halmarack wrote:

IME, overdoing it with a gate valve often just involves just looking at it wrongly!

You can just swap the whole thing - they are cheap as chips (for a reason!) - so not much point attempting repair of service. However I would swap it for a type of valve that will reliably close and open when required like a full bore butterfly or leaver action valve.

What was the phrase? "I am very stiff when I wake up in the morning, and not in a good way!"
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John.
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On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 10:20:06 +0100, John Rumm

Every cloud has a silver lining according to my good lady wife. :-)
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wrote:

She's no lady, no tiara.
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On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 20:14:39 +1000, "jeikppkywk"

So true.
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Mike

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On Wednesday, 11 September 2019 09:12:41 UTC+1, Mike Halmarack wrote:

Replace the valve. Gate valves normally seize.
Re not being able to move the pipes any, you can get a repair whatsit that slides along the pipe giving you an end that can move a fair way back or fo rth. If you just need a slight bit of movement you can also get a coupling with no inner whatsit (rim?) so it can slide around on pipes.
NT
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On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 05:01:29 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'll look out for those kind of features, they seem just right for this job.
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Mike

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The couplings with "no inner whatsit" are generally called 'slip' couplings.
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Can that feature be included in a lever valve, or is it an extra?
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Mike

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No, how could it? Oh, I suppose the 'open' position could be such that a pipe would go right through but I've never seen this designed in. Slip couplings usually look identical to normal straight couplings but can be slid wholly onto a pipe.
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Apologies, my mind was full of lever valves and gate valves at the time.
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Mike

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On 11/09/2019 14:45, Mike Halmarack wrote:

there is some slip possible when using stock compression fittings
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On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 09:12:42 +0100, Mike Halmarack

Not as bad as shooting the Sheriff, I suppose!
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