How to washing tonnes of muddy gravel?

A relative has about 80m² of gravelled areas around their house. Over the years, the gravel has become very muddy, and is now coverered with weeds.
Is there a cost effective way of washing gravel? I've tried putting it in a handheld steel sieve sloshing it around in wheelbarrow of water, but that was very slow, and generated large quantities of muddy water.
I suppose I could just put a membrane on top of it, followed by more gravel, but I'd like to re-use the existing stuff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<MrWeld> wrote in message

Stick in a heap and run a hose over it.
mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday 30 June 2013 18:17 wrote in uk.d-i-y:

The railways have ballast washers - so it's not a totally alien idea. But I have not heard of a protable machine for gravel.
--
Tim Watts Personal Blog: http://squiddy.blog.dionic.net/

http://www.sensorly.com/ Crowd mapping of 2G/3G/4G mobile signal coverage
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 30/06/2013 18:17, MrWeld wrote:

You don't need to wash it. Simply use a sieve with a mesh size slightly smaller than the gravel and sieve the dirt out. It is time consuming and you will end up with a surprisingly large pile of dirt, but it works.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

somewhere like machine mart sold a rotary sieve thingy, something stupid like 200 squids, and something that could possibly be knocked up fairly easily.
It was a cylinder of mesh, i think it had a metal spider at one end, to which it attached to the frame via a bearing, a motor to the side drove it around like a cement mixer, cylinder on an incline... bung a shovel full of mixed crap in the open end, it's rotated around and the muck drops thru the mesh into a barrow below, and the good stuff falls out the back in a separate heap.
Wonder if someone could make up a sieve barrel or a cement mixer, just pop the cement mixing barrel off, pop the sieve cylinder on, away you go.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Every kitchen has one - or an old one lying outside, in many places.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Grimly Curmudgeon wrote:

Make this. http://www.nifty-stuff.com/homemade-rotary-trommel-screen.php
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That's pretty damned good.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 30/06/2013 21:41, Gazz wrote:

Possibly easier to make a long chute with a mesh base and send the gravel down that. For most people, probably easier to store for next time too. It is a job that needs to be done every few years.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, July 1, 2013 8:19:18 AM UTC+1, Nightjar wrote:

er

h
t
.
d
y
o.

Am I being stupid but surely if it was spread out over a path/drive the rai n would wash it eventually assuming the crap had been raked out of it, and its going to need raked to get it level anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 01/07/2013 09:03, fred wrote: ...

The problem is wind-blown dirt, which only washes down to the weed control membrane, where it makes a nice base for weeds to grow in. Once every few years you need to remove that dirt, or you may as well not have a membrane.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 01/07/13 09:37, Nightjar wrote:

+1
and its also dirt that comes off car tyres as well. I've got 3"+ of limestone and 2" of gravel on tyop, and ten years on its full of mud and decayed organic material.
path clear sorts the weeds out. every ten years or so it needs more gravel on top. As the cars grind the sub base deeper into the subsoil
--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a diminishing number of producers.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add that to the already long list of ways in which gravel drives suck.
--
Today is Boomtime, the 36th day of Confusion in the YOLD 3179
RIP: Richard Burton Matheson (February 20, 1926 – June 23, 2013)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, July 1, 2013 10:13:49 AM UTC+1, Huge wrote:

e rain would wash it eventually assuming the crap had been raked out of it, and its going to need raked to get it level anyway.

Yes. My experience of them was poor. Gravel accumulating on the outside of the bend etc because 'kids' dont slow down. Tried snow blade on Westwood to level it. Waste of time. Gave up and had it tarmacadamed. Haven't looked b ack since.
I do prefer the appearance of gravel but it was too much trouble.
Never had trouble with dirt on it though did have to replace gravel every s o often.
I found weed suppressing membrane a wast of time. Weeds will grow anywhere.
After a short period of time sufficient dust builds up on the mambrane to g ive weed some purchase.
Many years ago neighbour followed advice from website as to depths and type s of different gravel to use for a 'good' job. Can't remember the figures b ut his car sank 3" into it the first time he drove over it. Somebody goofed somewhere,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 01/07/2013 10:13, Huge wrote:

I don't have gravel on a drive, but I do have noisy to walk on gravel around the house in areas where nobody ought to be walking at night.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I do.
I wish I didn't.
--
Today is Boomtime, the 36th day of Confusion in the YOLD 3179
--- Reassuringly greasy ---
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 30/06/2013 21:41, Gazz wrote:

I had one of these for sieving 30 tonne of top soil .... great machines, and you had a choice of mesh liners. Picked mine up on eBay ... did job and sold it for more than I bought it for.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, July 2, 2013 6:57:11 PM UTC+1, Rick Hughes wrote:

d
y
o.

Round here they just erect a mesh screen @ 45 degrees to vertical and throw the top soil at it. Suitable container behind to cart it away is handy. As these screens are light they are easily moved to where the soil is. Not pe rfect but cheap. Mind you I'd prefer what you had.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 30 Jun 2013 18:17:51 +0100, MrWeld wrote:

Bung it in a concrete mixer for a few rotations? Pour out through a suitably sized sieve, over a container for the water (barrel?) bucket some of the water back from the barrel to the mixer and add a bucket of clean. Excess water will overflow and drain away.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 30 Jun 2013 18:17:51 +0100, MrWeld <MrWeld> wrote:

Hire a cement mixer?
--

Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.