how to replace a fitted gas oven

Hi, My Mum has a fitted kitchen from the 70's. her gas oven is falling apart (door doesn't fit etc. She'd like to get it replaced.
I know this is a stupid question, but I'm not entirely sure what you do. Presumably.
1) If we replace with a gas oven , I buy the oven, get a fitter to remove the old one and fit a new one.
2) If we replace with an electric one, then same as above but I also need an electrician to run a new mains spur for the new oven, and the gas fitter caps off the existing supply
Or do new ovens come with the option of a fitter.
To compound the problem the existing oven is 570mm wide by 850mm tall which , it appears is no longer a popular size.
any general advice on what seems a bit of a logistical problem, would be much appreciated.
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Yes
Many electric ovens only need a 13 amp supply so could be plugged into an exisitng power point.
It is electric cookers that need their own dedicated higher amperage supply

All ovens should fit a standard 600mm wide carcass the dimensions given often include the fascia which overlaps the side of the carcass
height is incidental as infill or ventilation grill can be fitted at the top to fill any remaining gap
Hovever 600mm and 850 mm are standard height carcass measurements for cookers

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On Wed, 08 Aug 2007 00:03:35 -0700 someone who may be jives11

As has been said, it may well be possible to connect an electric oven to an existing power circuit, though that depends on the rating of the oven, the capacity of the circuit and how heavily it is loaded. If all these are suitable then that will generally be the cheapest option, though not one I would adopt if doing it myself.
If that is not possible then it is as well to provide a proper cooker supply of 30A-45A. The cable and fittings will be more expensive, but the labour is the same compared to a lower rated supply. This will allow future flexibility in provision of hobs. I am assuming that the oven and hob are reasonably close together, within 4m of each other.
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David Hansen, Edinburgh
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many thanks to all the input. I think the main issue is that the width on the cavity in the current unit is 570mm and not 600 (this is from the late 70's)
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wrote this:-

Modern cabinets are 600m external dimension so that a 600mm door covers the edges, the internal dimension is therefore 570mm the difference being 2 x 15mm sides
And as I said previously the oven dimension given may include the width of the fascia which would overlap the carcass sides. All built in ovens should fit fine in a 570mm wide cavity
Tony
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