How to repair hairline crack in hardwood exterior door?

My brother has recently let a house to some rather pernickety folk. The front door, 6 panel hardwood, has hairline cracks through two of the panels. The cracks are dead straight and obviously where the glue joint between the two boards has failed when the timber shrank. Cracks are less than 1mm in width. No way to fit a sliver of wood in the gap. New tenants are moaning about this and want a new door. This to me seems way ott. I was thinking of mixing up some fine sandings (of similar colour) with pva and possibly water then applying this to the cracks. Clean off and allow to dry. Then lightly sand as reqd and apply matching finish.
Do you think this is a goer or have any alternative suggestion?
Thanks, Nick.
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Panels in panelled doors are supposed to be a loose fit - they fit into grooves to allow for shrinkage and expansion. So that when the wood shrinks the only problem should be a strip of unstained or unpainted wood which may appear at the side.
This is also something to take into account when painting panel doors. Don't paint over the joins if this will hinder movement in the panels.
If you don't believe me check it out on the web.
michael adams
...
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... is the right answer. They expand and contract every time humidity and temperature changes the moisture content in the timber. Paint or varnish at the panel edges will stop the panels working as they were intended to.

If you want to paint a panelled door, buy a molded one rather than a real one. Likewise, don't varnish them, but stain or wax instead, so the timber can continue to move.
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How would that work with an external door subject to driving rain? I don't think it would.
Treating the panels like panes of glass and bedding them in silicone might.
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fred
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On 01/05/15 09:23, fred wrote:

It does.

get a mastic frame sealer that is dark brown
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The recommendation was for a loose fit which clearly would not.

That is a different solution from a loose fit and was basically what I was advocating.
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fred
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On 01/05/15 11:40, fred wrote:

your statement is entirely false.
First of all the ability of water to penetrate is down to the path length and width and the wind velocity. If these are in fact beyond some lints the water never gets to te other side,.
Secondly a sliding fit is not a loose fit. Its just not tight enough to split the wood.
I have 3 solid oak doors that are made with T&G panels with no glue involved and no water gets through.

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On Fri, 1 May 2015 09:23:03 +0100, fred wrote:

changes

Panels are still a snug fit and not otherwise fixed. If the wood wants to move it WILL move. A little bit of paint or varnish ain't going to stop it. See Mr Gaff's post.
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Nick scribbled

Tell 'em to fuck off.
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If it does not let the rain in or the wind in, and is not a security risk, then yes, tell them to fuck off. If you don't, they will be looking at hairline cracks in the ceiling next.

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On 30/04/15 20:03, Nick wrote:

I'd inject some sealant - not silicone, but something flexible.
And tell the tenants to shut up. Wood moves. If the gap is filled its fine. Sigh. Some people....
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On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 20:03:29 +0100, "Nick"

Speaking as someone who regularly fits slivers of wood in 1mm cracks if he can't persuade the two faces to butt up, the technique involves planing a long, tapered shaving of wood from a matching or similar piece, straightening out the curl and teasing it, thin edge first, into the gap. That's not the way I'd fix a door, though.
But I agree with the others on here: those pernickety folk can leave as soon as their agreement expires if they don't like it. Unless there is a clause about door-cracks in the contract. Or unless this is one of those thousand-pounds-a-week-type luxury lets where everything ought to be totally impeccable and they are within their rights to complain.
Nick
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Nick wrote:

    Duck tape!
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On 30/04/2015 23:03, Capitol wrote:

Stand your ground if it aint causing issues (leaks etc) You will fix problems but not aesthetics, if they want to replace the door (their expense) then it will be inspected after installation and if it does not come up to standard they will pay for a replacement.
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That depends on how long you want it to last and whether its exposed to sun and frost. I notice on my old door this and other things like split paint around the edges of the beading keep on happening after about a year or so of this temperature cycling. the door is fine otherwise of course. Brian
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On 01/05/2015 08:06, Brian Gaff wrote:

The filler suggested by the OP doesn't work visually. Same wood, so it should, but actually it will stand out like a sore thumb.
The best filler IME is

partly because it's easy to get an exact colour match, plus you can quickly trim flush with a sharp chisel
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