how much for 3-port valve supply and fit?

All,
My 3-port valve is sticking and needs replacing. Although I've done it
myself in the past I'm not really inclined to do it again. My question
is, how much should I expect to pay a plumber for supply and fitting?
A direct replacement for the valve is =A385.
Mark
Reply to
sticky
================================== I don't know about the plumber's fee but consider buying the valve from an alternative source:
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Reply to
Cicero
In article , Cicero writes:
If you're paying someone to fit it, it's probably worth paying extra if necessary to get exactly the same one, so there's no modification of pipework/fittings required.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
In article ,
I thought that and got one of the same make. Didn't fit - they'd changed the design slightly in the intervening years. And of course the new one was smaller which meant extending the pipes.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
Assuming a partial drain down is required. I'd allocate half a day (£120) and £50 for the valve and the inhibitor (Your source of supply is way off the market price). So £180. Might come down to £150 if the customer is previously known to me, i.e has a track record of not making trouble etc.
I'd be happy to do a few extras whilst I was there (e.g. a tap washer say), if the job went well.
Reply to
Ed Sirett
the =A340 valves just as good as the =A380 honeywells?
As the system will be drained there are also two thermostatic radiator valves that need changing, the current ones vibrate like mad.
My heating programmer is also a little iffy. It's also the type that can't set HW and CH independently, and also only does 1 day. What should I expect to pay for a 7 day timer?
Is this starting to sounds like an all day job?
Mark
Reply to
sticky
In article , sticky writes:
That's characteristic of valves being used with the flow in the wrong direction. Nowadays, I think most are designed to work with flow in either direction, but that didn't used to be the case.
Many heating engineers won't touch the electrics. The last few I've had dealings with either had a separate electrician they brought in for that, or asked me to do it.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
If it's just changing to a different timing method then it's a fairly trivial job. If it's making HW and CH independent then it can get a bit more tricky as the wiring will need to be understood. Have no idea how much timers are. Look in Screwfix for example.
Reply to
adder1969
Personally, I'd go for the well-known brand. Honeywell stuff is more expensive for a reason.
That's a bit crap, the whole point of using a 4073 is to permit either or both at the same time.
I have a Honeywell ST6400C, I think it was around £30. However a fair bit of wiring may be required to take advantage of the two-channel facility. The timer and motorized valve have to contrive together a bit to make it work.
The plumber will put the valve in, but unless you plan to DIY, you'll want a spark to do the wiring of the controls for you. If you haven't already done so, it would be a good opportunity to fit room and cylinder stats as well. It won't take long to pay for itself.
Reply to
Geronimo W. Christ Esq
The current timer does allow water, heating or both together, but they have to be for the same timings, i.e. if it's set for twice a day then the water and heating will go on and off together. I can't set the water to be on between 5:00-6:00 and the heating between 7:00-9:00 for example.
I read about the rad stat valves being in the wrong direction, but it looks like our valve can go either way, so I guess it's a different problem.
I plumber is due to call me back tomorrow, so I'll get a quote.
Mark
Reply to
sticky
In article ,
I can't really see why you'd want to. If you're storing the hot water once it's up to temperature the boiler won't do anything to it. With an instant system the same really applies.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
Probably so that the load of heating the HW has gone by the time the demand for heating the house is called for.
Reply to
adder1969
In article , "Dave Plowman (News)" writes:
If you come back to a cold house and want it quickly heated, then heat sucked by the H/W heating may not be desirable.
If you have the heating providing setback or frost protection whilst you are away, you don't want the H/W cylinder heated.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
In article ,
Still not much help. If the hot water store is depleted by the previous day's use it will need a certain time to heat it up. If there is some left the time taken will simply be less. So unless you are happy with no hot water you simply give it adequate time - after it has heated up the boiler will switch off or be available for the space heating.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
In article , Ed Sirett writes:
I used Drayton TRV4's throughout, and they are nearly all installed what would have been the wrong way around before they were bi-directional (because I try to install them all on the return side pipework). They work fine, although in practice they probably don't shut down much, as the whole house gets to temperature at the same time.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
Except with the Danfoss RAS-C revolvers where you can physically reverse the flow through the valve by twisting a ring on the top of it, e.g. if you get chattering due to reverse flow.
Reply to
John Stumbles

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