Headlight (low beam) not working (Nissan Tino 1.8, 2001)



I've posted one here:
http://tinyurl.com/hv3ssfb
JD
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Thanks. The trouble is that the powered side of the fuse holder is dead, even when the lights are switched on. Hence my proposed fix (pls see my message of a moment ago)..
JD
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On 05/12/2015 10:51, JD wrote:

that would put double the load on the existing working fuse and wiring, the relay is designed to power both, so that will be ok. I would try it using the existing rating of fuse, if that survives then it will be ok for a while at least.
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Both fuses themnselves are faultless and intact. The problem is no power to the fuse (in the case of the light that doesn't come on). As for a relay, I cannot find one that has ane effect on the headlight that does work. Is it certain that there IS one for the low beam, do you think?
JD
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JD wrote:
{...]

Did you look at the link I posted earlier? It clearly lists two headlamp relays, with a diagram showing their location.
There will be one relay for dip, and one for main. It's possible that there are separate contacts on each relay for LH and RH side, in which case the fault might be the dip relay.
It's more likely that there is a single contact feeding one wire to the fuse box, which then splits within the base of the box. In that case the fault is likely to be a break under the fuse box.
Chris
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replying to Mrcheerful , JD wrote:

]]
This seems to be my best option. I am thinking of making up a lead with a crocodile clip at one end, which I clip to the battery positive, then feed that wire to a new dashboard auxiliary switch and have another wire going from this switch to the headlight. Is a fuse really necessary for this?
JD
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On 19/12/2015 16:44, JD wrote:

Yes a fuse is essential, use an in line one close to your crocodile clip, not that I approve of your method of connecting to the battery. Without a fuse you run the risk of a few meters of glowing red hot wire - been there and done it, albeit 50 years ago!
Peter
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replying to Peter Andrews , JD wrote:

I agree about the crocodile clip; I securely clamped the wire instead. Surely, the bulb itself will act as a fuse, won't it? I couldn't find an inline fuse today, so I wired it up with no fuse. Why would the wire get red hot?
JD
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On 19/12/2015 23:44, JD wrote:

Are you a mechanical superhero, incapable of making mistakes?
If so, leave the fuse out.
If you're a normal human being, put one in, because that way when you accidentally short the wire onto something (not entirely unlikely) the fuse will blow rather than you ending up with a red hot wire dripping insulation all over your nice engine bay.
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On 19/12/2015 23:44, JD wrote:

A fuse is the 'weak link' in a circuit, it's purpose is to protect the wiring in the event of a fault. For example, in your case, if you have an accident and your headlamp assembly is badly damaged such that the wiring is crushed against the body shell there is a real possibility that the battery will supply as much current as it can down the damaged wire which will result in it becoming very (red) hot and melting the insulation and that of the adjoining cables ultimately catching fire. The purpose of the fuse, located relatively close to the battery, is to fail if an excessive amount of current flows therefore stopping further current flowing and reducing the chance of fire. Please for your own and your passengers safety fit a fuse, it's not funny being in a car that catches fire it does very, very quickly become an inferno. Most car fires are a total loss.
Peter
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That would be correct if the fuse was good.

Is there volts between the fuse and ground?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

No, there is zero volts between the ssde of the fuse socket that is supposed to be live, and ground.
JD
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Right - so no volts getting to the fuse. Which means the fault is in the feed to it.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

I posted the Hayens schematic here:
http://tinyurl.com/hv3ssfb
Can anyone decipher that and tell me what the relay should look like?
BTW, I'm puzzled by that schematic, because it doesn't show any single- filament headlights. My low beam lights are separate, single-filament bulbs.
TIA!
JD
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Typical Haynes - trying to show every possible combination of all variants in the same diagram. How I hate them. ;-)
Looks like there are only relays involved if you have daytime running lights?
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On Sat, 05 Dec 2015 15:45:14 +0000 (GMT)

And the Haynes manual for my model of Renault doesn't have my engine size, the only mention is that it isn't included.
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On 05/12/2015 17:36, Davey wrote:

Haynes manuals are not even very useful as a door stop, let alone a reference. If I had the time and was paid to do it, I would visit them and point out some of the errors I have noticed from the distant past when I used to refer to them.
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The car has no daytime running lights. There is a relay labeled "main" being an 80A relay. Would that mean 'main beam'?
If there is no relay for the low beam bulbs, this means that the full current for both low-beam bulbs goes through a single headlight switch contact, yes?
JD
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JD wrote:

Where are you looking at? There is a relay labelled 'Main' in the fascia relay box that feeds various 'ignition on' circuits; it will have nothing to do with the lights.
There are either one or two under-bonnet relay boxes shown in the link I posted. The smaller one of the two holds the headlight relays, but may not be fitted to your vehicle.

If your vehicle has only one under-bonnet relay box, then that is the case, yes.
Whichever arrangement you have, if your fault is with the dip beam in one headlight, the problem can only be at or after the fuse box, because everything before that is a single circuit.
Chris
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Hi Chris, I was looking at the under-bonnet relay that is dlightly to thr nearside of center (not the one in your link)

I pullod out all of the six relays in the box shown in your link but none had any effect on the low-beam bulb that is working properly, NB There are fewer relays in that box than shown in your link.

Okay - thanks. I'm tempted to just brdge the two positive sides of the two low-beam fuses, so that power gets to the currently-dead low-beam bulb, via it's own normal fuse.
JD
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