Gutters Fascias and Soffits.

Hi,
I had a quote from a company I have used for most of my house for fitting new facias soffits and gutters ( capped over existing) for £4000.I was a bit shocked to be honest. Am I unreasonable to think this is rather expe nsive? I have a two bedroom bungalow (four sides) 26ft on one side and 33ft oblong.
I am now thinking of getting OH to do it. But I have run into problems.
a) Of the many sorts of plastic on the market,which thickness is best.
I am also having difficulty sourcing somewhere locally to sell me just the plastic bits.
b)Can someone explain simply how you fit soffits and facias over the existi ng?
(OH can already do guttering no problems there).
c) Would I just be better off painting and leaving it a few more years?
Its cast iron guttering .The wood of the facias etc. is good and has been w ell painted( until I arrived anyway).
Any reasonable answers. Thanks.
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On Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:50:46 -0700 (PDT), sweetheart

If it ain't broke, don't fix it!
Get OH to paint it, or get a quote from a professional decorator.
--

Chris

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On 23/08/2016 06:50, sweetheart wrote:

Its fairly pricey... certainly one of those jobs that will be much cheaper if you can DIY.

For the facia board, you normally use a relatively thin board when over boarding. Guttering tends to be a one thickness fits all thing.

There are loads of suppliers of uPVC stuff about, but there are plenty online, and places like Wickes will have what you need as well.

The facia is L shaped - it has a lip at the bottom. So you take off the existing gutter. Trim to the right depth, and then nail it onto the face of the existing facia so that the lip wraps round the bottom of the wood hiding it. You leave a small gap between the bottom of the existing facia and the lip.
You then get vee board of similar material for the soffit. That's a wide plastic T & G board that is made to look like smaller individual board (each lenth is profiled into three "planks" normally. That you cut into appropriate lengths, and support one end under the lip on the facia, and the other is held by a channel or trim you fix to the wall or existing soffit.

Depends on what is actually wrong with the existing.

I would be tempted to keep it if its all in good working order and all it lacks is paint.
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John.
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Thanks for the reply. Since yesterday I have had a good look at the existin g guttering , soffits and fascia (OH was out cutting down a tree that had g rown over 40 feet -a big job, so I had ladders and step ladders and could t ake a look easily)
They are all in good order. However, I really knew this and was only consi dering plastic because everyone tells me how maintenance free they are. I am seriously considering painting it - at least for this year now. The re ason it looks tatty is because the brown paint I put over it around 15 year s ago is coming away and showing the green paint that was previously there in a few places. A good clean would sort most of it. Even the cast iron gu ttering is in good shape - a couple of brackets need replacing. ( I know it s heavy to take down).
I am a bit disappointed in the quote to be honest.I had expected around £1600- £2000 max
I am inclined to not fix what isn't broke now.
My OH knows a painter - an old friend since school days (he is good, retire d now but been in the trade over 40 years) who has taken a look at it last night and offered to paint it for £600. He says its in good conditio n and wont take above three days.
I have asked him to paint (and wallpaper) my kitchen right now......so I mi ght tag this on the end.
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On Wednesday, 24 August 2016 07:58:56 UTC+1, sweetheart wrote:

red now but been in the trade over 40 years) who has taken a look at it la st night and offered to paint it for £600. He says its in good condit ion and wont take above three days.
I've never paid anyone £200 a day to paint!
NT
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On Wednesday, August 24, 2016 at 9:47:11 AM UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

tired now but been in the trade over 40 years) who has taken a look at it last night and offered to paint it for £600. He says its in good cond ition and wont take above three days.

Including getting all the paint. I am not providing any materials.
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On Wednesday, 24 August 2016 12:31:13 UTC+1, sweetheart wrote:

retired now but been in the trade over 40 years) who has taken a look at i t last night and offered to paint it for £600. He says its in good co ndition and wont take above three days.

8 hours if you're lucky at £200 - £10 of paint = £23.75 an hour. Steep for painting.
NT
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On Friday, August 26, 2016 at 10:39:16 AM UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

, retired now but been in the trade over 40 years) who has taken a look at it last night and offered to paint it for £600. He says its in good condition and wont take above three days.

an hour. Steep for painting.

So, you reckon it can be done in a day?When I did it 15 years ago, it took me nearly three weeks. OK, thats a longer time I agree. However, , it has to be cleaned and sanded down and the flaking paint rubbed back. Thats one day in itself. The house has four sides. Its not just a front and a back an d a couple of evaes.
Then it has to be under coated. Maybe two lots, I dont know what the painte r will do. I gave it one coat when I did it, but given the time and damage in some places (on layer of gloss flaking off the other) it might take more .
Then he will have to paint the top coat.
Even if he gave it only one coat of under coat and one of top coat, it isn' t going to be done in a day. Paint has to dry.
Its soffits, fascia and guttering he will be doing, not just a simple barge board across the front.
I thought £600 was reasonable so that I am not made to do it myself. I am older now and do not feel up to climbing on a chair and painting, then getting down and moving along and doing it again...... at least the man wil l have step ladders to do it. I cant do that. I do not like ladders.
I have looked at the price of paint ( and yes, I know he will get a trade d iscount) but its still around two large tins at £222.99 a tin ( for gl oss) and another £20 or so for under coat ( per tin ) .Again it is lik ely to be two tins. I used more than that if I recall.
I reckon £100 in materials.
I have checked across the internet for price estimates for painting fascias and guttering. The going rate seems to be around £700/800 .
Having said that.Your last calculation of £23.75 and hour ,I wouldnt h ave thought was out of a ball park for a skilled apprenticed workman who I can trust in this day and age. Then there is his travel expenses and of c ourse that money is before tax.
Anyway, it beasts the hell out of £4K for covering it in plastic.
Pay peanuts.... get a p ole? Is that what you think I should do? No thank s.
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On Saturday, 27 August 2016 07:18:14 UTC+1, sweetheart wrote:

od, retired now but been in the trade over 40 years) who has taken a look at it last night and offered to paint it for £600. He says its in goo d condition and wont take above three days.

5 an hour. Steep for painting.

Clearly I used the figure you gave of 3 days. How do I know what does & doe sn't need doing on your house.

4k!

nks.
Do what you like.
NT
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sweetheart wrote:

IME plastic is not low maintenance if it is white. Also, there are now maintenance problems with moss clearance from gutters in most houses. A bungalow is advantageous as a pressure washer wand can be used very easily from ground level in many cases.
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sweetheart presented the following explanation :

Straight forward semi, just front and back to do, next door had been done. We were quoted £950 and £1200 to do ours - a few years ago now. Because I could do it and make a better job of it, I did it myself.
I think my materials cost was around £200, but front fall pipe was already done. The Plumbcentre stock all you will need. Make sure you use stainless for fixings.
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On 23/08/2016 06:50, sweetheart wrote:

Have you checked that the wood *behind and above* the gutter is in good condition?
I ask because cast iron guttering can be a pain to take down so as to paint the whole fascia. While the wood behind/above doesn't get exposed to much if any sunlight and weather, it can end up rotten while the regularly painted wood below is in good nick :(
--
Robin
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On 23/08/2016 06:50, sweetheart wrote:

Mine cost ~£160 but its a quarter of the size.
The quote you have must include rebuilding the walls!
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£4000 is ridiculous for a bungalow of your size, something nearer a qu arter that cost I can understand. Be careful of just covering rotten wood, we had that done round a square bay window at the last house only because t he zinc roof of it would have needed replacing to do otherwise. The job loo ked OK for a while but movement of the underlying fascias caused some long term problems.
At our present house covering was done with the same result but the most si gnificant problem was the reduction of the tile overhang which by the time the gutters were fitted resulted in a gap behind the gutters allowing water to drip down the fascias. I have had to put in felt support trays to ensur e water ended up in the gutters.
If replacing, the advised solution, then 16mm fascias are the answer. If co vering 9mm should be the maximum.
http://www.screwfix.com/p/felt-support-tray-1-5m-5-pack/36622
Richard
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On Tuesday, 23 August 2016 06:50:48 UTC+1, sweetheart wrote:

g new facias soffits and gutters ( capped over existing) for £4000.I w as a bit shocked to be honest. Am I unreasonable to think this is rather ex pensive? I have a two bedroom bungalow (four sides) 26ft on one side and 33 ft oblong.

e plastic bits.

ting?

well painted( until I arrived anyway).

4k sounds silly. Do it yerself. Just be aware cast iron gutter is heavy stu ff. Reuse it, obviously.
NT
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On 23/08/2016 06:50, sweetheart wrote:

Since scaffolding will not be necessary this is a rip off.
Neighbour paid £2500 for a two-bed semi (house) and this included scaffolding and replacing the soft/rotten timber that comprises the outer rail of the gable end ladder (the 4 x 2 timber that the barge boards nail onto).
Normal practise is to remove existing fascia boards and replace with 12 mm OSB cut into strips with the same width as the stuff being removed. Nail this onto the ends of the rafters so that it supports the last row of tiles correctly. Push the tile back and use some 12 inc wide DPC to *underlap* the sarking felt which will have frayed and sagged, and *over*lap the OSB by about 2 inches. Nail the hockey stick UPVC moulding over the top using the correct pins. leave a gap between the OSB and the horizontal bit at the bottom so that the soffit board can slot into it. Some means of support will be needed for thr soffit board if you live in a windy area.
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I had my two sides of a terraced property done for under 2000, perhaps the bloke just does not want the job so priced it high.
Which reminds me, ever since we have been here in the house there has been no felt in the loft where the tiles are. a bloke told me the roof needed rebuilding but to me it seems pretty robust. the only issue with having air blowing in the loft seems to be when we get the wrong kind of snow, ie the powdery stuff, which ends up on top of the lagging and melts there. so far no harm seems to have been done though. Brian
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Brian Gaff wrote:

He's right, the roof needs stripping and felt inserted.
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Capitol wrote :

Not necessary. My own roof was built without anything other than the tiles, but in any spot you might choose on my roof, you will find it has three layers of tiles, such is the overlap.
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er.. shouldn't there be ventilation between the sarking/membrane and the fascia?
--
Tim Lamb

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