Gas safety check

What's a gas fitter supposed to do with a hot water heater when carrying out a gas safety check? How does this differ to practice? Just had the gas checked (it's rented accommodation) and all he did was look at the flame through the little window. The only time he opened the heater was after he was fool enough to turn out the pilot light and couldn't light it again. Hehehe. Are water heaters generally safe compared to, say, a gas fire?? Never had a gas supply before so it's a whole new experience :)
--
john

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/dwarfinleopardskin
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This site should answer a good few questions for you:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/gas/domestic/
There is a lot of reading through the menu selections so have a shop around the site.
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I believe they are supposed to do more than that. Aren't they supposed to check for corbonmonoxide at least? The manufacturer should be able to give advice. Gas water heaters have bad image from the past of killing people esp when sited in bathrooms.
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On Thu, 13 May 2004 20:00:40 +0100, BillV wrote:

Many modern water heaters are now room sealed appliances like most boilers so there is less inherent risk of CO poisoning.
However a number of checks should be made to all gas appliances including water heaters.
This list is not intended to be exhautive or cover every aspect:
1) The flue should be visually checked     Does it comply in terms of siting. Is it in good order.     Is it working poperly (especially for open flued appliances).
2) Likewise where does the combustion air come from     Vents?     Room sealed?     Air for appliance cooling?
3) Does the appliance work correctly?     Flame picture.     Burner pressure.     Rate of gas consumption. Thermostats and valves working OK?     Inlet gas supply OK?
4) Do the safety controls work properly?     Thermocouple drop out time (under 60s for a water heater).      5) General condition of the appliance?
At the very least a visual check of the flue and the flames and checking the pilot light/themrocouple/gas valve for safety. Checking the burner pressure is easy and only take a moment.
--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at www.diyfaq.org.uk
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None of that. The bedroom heater has a flue and he didn't check that neither.

I've gone a bit nuts on sealing the living room. Not totally sealed but there were holes in the floorboards, cellar door didn't shut, cold draft whistling from the cupboard under the sink (because the ceiling had come down in the cellar due to the sink leaking). He never asked.

Like said - quick look at the pilot light and the flame when the tap was on and that's it. The fire he did a smoke test on (after ripping chunks of the plaster off the wall when he lifted the fire down), looked at the flame, lighted this stick and waved it at the fire, and that was that. Commented that it was old but still worked ok. The bedroom heater had a knackered ignition, which he's "fixed" and suggested I get some WD40 for it. Presumably not to light it with :P

You mean how long it takes to shut the gas off when the pilot light goes out? None of that. Assuming the water heater doesn't predate the invention of thermocouples :D

The fire has a coating of blue Hammerite hammer finish I kid you not. Looks a picture, really does. The water heater is slightly better condition, though the gas pipe to it has been sort of twisted - presumably to limit the gas pressure?? I would have thought that there'd be a "thing" to do this :-S

So the conclusion is that the safety certificate aint worth the paper it's written on. If I end up in ITU due to CO poisoning I guess I stand to make a fair bit in compensation :-/ And I thought private accommodation would be better than Council <rolls eyes>
Ta.
--
john

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/dwarfinleopardskin
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Can't help but wonder if an engineer can claim like mechanics do with testing of cars, 'it was ok at the time I tested it guv'....
-- troubleinstore www.tupppencechange.co.uk
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On Tue, 18 May 2004 07:58:09 +0100, troubleinstore

peanuts n monkeys..
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On Tue, 18 May 2004 01:38:38 +0000, sneezy wrote:

There will be hell to pay. A certain amount of claiming that it was OK at the time might happen but that won't stand intense scrutiny, will it. The fitter will be in the Sh*t his employer more so and the council even more (for employing a company without ensuring they weren't crap).
However the fire is the only appliance likely to give you CO poisoning at _it_ did pass a spillage test.
--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at www.diyfaq.org.uk
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