fixing metal back box in stud wall

Hello,
What is the best way to fit a metal back box to a stud wall? I know I could use a dry lining box, but a metal box screwed in, just seems more secure imho.
Should the box have pre-drilled holes for screws to go through or do I have to drill my own? The box I have got has one hole per side but they are on the front edge, so they would align with the plasterboard rather than a noggin and they seem too wide for screws.
Thanks Stephen.
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Use a dry lining box, you are making a simple job much more complicated try ing to fix a metal box in place. It is easy enough when the studding is exp osed but a whole different and complicated process in an existing wall. Wha t makes you think a dry lining box is any less secure, I have seen metal bo xes pulled out of plastered walls easier than a dry lining box. Most metal boxes I have seen in block walls have been secured by a single clout nail a nd relying on the subsequent plaster to hold them in place.
Richard
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What some so called pros do when time is money doesn't much matter on a DIY group, where most will (hopefully) take pride in what they do.
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On Thu, 06 Aug 2015 19:29:56 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

ok. now tell the op how to fit the metal backbox and what would make it more secure than the plastic one
steve
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Have done. Earlier in the thread. It's how I've done it for ages.
I can spot a dry lining box at 100 yards and hate them.
But can understand they make things easier for those who don't care.
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One thing that makes a metal back box fairly secure is to attach a piece of wood, or another, inverted, 'spacer' back box of suitable thickness to the stone or brick wall behind a plastered wall using wallplugs, then screw the back box to that spacer.
Assuming that there is a stone or brick wall behind the plaster, of course.
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Windmill wrote:

That would be a rather unusual stud wall ...
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It depends on what you mean my a stud wall. Quite often battens are nailed to a solid wall with Plaster board on top. This fooled me when I was "modernising" my daughter's flat some years ago.
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charles wrote:

I would call that a dry-liner.
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Lot of unusual things in old Edinburgh flats.
But I was thinking more of lath and plaster walls than drywall.
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Think it was common on stone solid walls to provide a degree of insulation in the cold north. With bricks, it's easier to make a cavity wall.
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Then there's people like me who have at times found the various holes in metal back boxes very convenient for injecting expanding foam to lock the box nicely into place :)
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On 06/08/2015 11:41, Tricky Dicky wrote:

Sanity check, this *is* plasterboard and not lath and plaster?
If the former, dry lining. If the latter, you need to mount it over a stud (or noggin) in a suitable position to provide access for the cable through the standard holes. You *may* need to drill new screw holes, for example if fixing at one end of a double box you might want suitable screw holes near the top and the bottom.
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Tricky Dicky wrote:

wot 'e said.
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On Thursday, August 6, 2015 at 11:16:53 AM UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@to.newsgroup.invalid wrote:

Use a dry lining box. It's simple, just cut the hole to the right dimensions tightly with a pad saw and clip the box in. When the accessory screws are tightened the plasterboard is clamped between the tabs and the face of the box and accessory.
A metal box will need screwing at the sides to a piece of studwork timber. You would also need a piece of wood the other side and to screw through the plasterboard into the wood to hold it in place.
Philip
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On Thu, 06 Aug 2015 11:16:57 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@to.newsgroup.invalid wrote:

Fit a noggin between the studs at the required height of box from floor and at the correct depth so that front edge of box is flush or only just behind the *finished* face of the plasterboard and/or skim. Fitting a nggin before the wall is boarded out is easy afterwards use a drylinging box.

Sides generaly don't have holes but the back should, to take screws/nails into noggin or brick/block.
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On Thursday, 6 August 2015 11:16:53 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@to.newsgroup.invalid wrote:

Different boxes have different holes in; I've used holes in the left / right / bottom sides to hold back boxes in skirting board. I think they were wickes boxes.
Owain
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Also looks neater. You can see a drylining box is there.

What I do is cut a couple of battens from something like 25 x 12mm just a bit longer than the sides. If you're going to decorate, fix them to the back of the plasterboard with screws through the plasterboard, and make good over the heads. Use screws that don't rust. If you don't want to decorate, you can glue them in place. Clamp with a G clamp until set.
Drill holes top and bottom in the sides of the box lining up with the centre of the batten, and screw to the batten. Gives as strong a fixing as the plasterboard. Sounds a bit of a fiddle - but if you've got lots to do drill all the holes in the boxes in one session, and cut the required number of battens too.
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There new ones with a much reduced external rim. You'd be pushed to see any differnce between them and a metal rear box.

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If you must go down this path then I would suggest that in addition to two battens each side of the cut-out (glued) a batten across the back would then allow you to use the existing fixing holes and the whole assembly will be clamped tight with the two accessory fixing screws. Just need to get the right thickness of side battens to clear rhe back of the box. However, I prefer a drylining box - a suitable socket will hide any rim.
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